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19

Supercook Supercook's core feature is a "pantry inventory" system. You basically fill in all the ingredients you have in your kitchen. You are presented with recipe choices based on a subset of your ingredients, as you enter them. You can then "emphasize" certain ingredients which makes them a required ingredient in the recipes you are shown. It will also ...


18

It's not a "cheat sheet", and is rather too big to stick to your fridge, but I highly recommend the book The Flavor Bible, which is an encyclopedia of exactly these associations. What ingredients does any particular ingredient go with? How do you cook it? Absolutely terrific book!


15

One resource I'm impressed with is Rouxbe.com, which is an "online cooking school" with truly excellent video content. (Disclosure: I'm an affiliate, though I haven't earned anything from it - I only signed up because I think it is great, I don't refer anything just to hope to make a buck). That link will give you a 14 day free trial. The thing I like is ...


13

How about Ruhlman's book, Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking? The entire work is dedicated to breaking cooking down into ratios, and it includes recipes. I hear the bread recipe is particularly good.


12

First, trust your nose. Smell the food you're cooking. Open the spice and sniff above it (but not too close, and don't sneeze!). If they smell good together, they usually taste good together. If you're working with products you can't taste test (like raw meat), either wait until the food is cooked to season, or be very conservative in your early experiments. ...


12

If you're looking for books, you could try "Roman Cookery" by Mark Grant or "The Classical Cookbook" by Andrew Dalby and Sally Grainger for ancient Roman food, or "The Philosopher's Kitchen" by Francine Segan, which combines ancient Greek and Roman cuisine. Many of these recipes are derived from the works of Apicius, but are not solely based on his ...


12

Based on my reading, (Buford, Bourdain, etc.) The only way to really learn how to cook is to intern in a restaurant. It's not about recipes, it's about being forced to cut 50 pounds of onions in 2 hours, and about grilling 60 steaks in an evening. It's about being able to sense when something is done. There is no substitute for being thrown to the wolves. ...


12

Upvote for chris (I don't have the rep yet). Though I'm no longer in the culinary industry, I graduated from a cooking school (Scottsdale Culinary Institute) a number of years ago and worked in a couple of high-end kitchens (namely, Christopher Gross). If you want to cook at home, watch Food Network and read cooking books/magazines. However, if you think you ...


11

One of the problems with using regular cookbooks to cook for yourself is after doing it for long enough, it's hard to get motivated to cook anything too complicated; no one else is going to know if you have a peanut butter sandwich for dinner. I contributed a few of my lazy ideas to Neurotic Physiology's "Grad Student Cooking in Style", but a large part of ...


10

As you're assessing your resources, remember that the one thing school always gives you, books can't give you, and the internet rarely gives you: feedback. For casual learning, books and trial and error are fine. Since you specifically asked about the caliber of skill that comes from culinary school though, you'll want feedback from people who are more ...


9

I also have neurological disorders that cause symptoms similar to chronic fatigue. Here are a few tricks that have helped me with cooking dinner: Make sure your kitchen is set up in an efficient organized way. Keeping your kitchen well organized is key to reducing the time you spend cooking. Take your limitations into account when organizing your ...


9

A few principles for re-heatable food that I've found over the years: Things with or in sauces heat nicely Dry things don't heat as well (plain rice, for example) Liquid distribution in the dish is important for even heating Dryer things like meats heat better when they have glazes or toppings (keep steam in) Things you can stir up mid-heat are nice for ...


9

Cooking classes aren't the only way to learn cooking - in fact, they're a relatively expensive way to go about it, especially as it's hard to introduce all the various techniques in one lesson. There are any number of beginner's cook books out there that introduce basic concepts and techniques extremely well. There are masses of videos on YouTube covering ...


8

I find the site startcooking.com particularly useful for some quick videos that are narrated clearly, photographed neatly, and generally are better in quality than those found on Youtube. Here is the video at that site: http://startcooking.com/video/295/Crack-and-Separate-an-Egg That said, there are many such videos on Youtube that might be useful also: ...


8

To piggyback on Tim Gilbert's answer, my wife will actually open two spice jars and hold one up to each nostril at the same time, to see if they smell like they would go together. More often than not, she picks out good combinations. Since there have been some great comprehensive links I don't think I have much more to add to your specific question about ...


8

You could certainly get a cookbook of side dishes and learn some new favourites, but what might be more useful is a book that teaches you about flavour combinations and menu planning. I would suggest Culinary Artistry as one such book. It's not about specific recipes (you can find those elsewhere or make them up), but rather it addresses the kind of skill ...


7

I really enjoy anything by Isa Chandra Moskowitz (Vegan With a Vengeance, Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, Veganomicon, etc.) (website, with lots of awesome recipes: http://www.theppk.com/). I also second the Moosewood suggestion; while lots of the things in there are lacto-ovo, most things are easy to veganize, and all really good. Lastly, while it's ...


6

I have one of the Betty Crocker books which dedicates several pages in the back to exactly this. I highly recommend getting something like this. Here are a few good ones online also: http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/yf/foods/he198w.htm http://www.joyofbaking.com/IngredientSubstitution.html http://lancaster.unl.edu/food/ciqsubs.shtml


6

This is a very subjective question. For example: I find the recipes on Gluten-Free Goddess to use excessive Xanthan Gum (bouncy balls do not make good cupcakes). That being said I highly suggest you start with the basics and make your own flour to learn the balance of how different flours effect the texture and flavor of baked goods. A few good books with ...


6

Have you ever visited Gode Cookery? From the site: Many of the recipes in this site originate from true medieval & Renaissance sources, are fully documented, and have been adapted for use in the modern kitchen. Original sources & bibliographies are featured whenever possible; historical authenticity and research are our main concerns, along with ...


6

Recently diagnosed Type II Diabetes patients are frequently prescribed a low-carbohydrate diet. The type of carbohydrate ("slow" or "simple" are familiar terms) doesn't matter so much as the total number of carbohydrates. A person with this dietary prescription would have learned to count gross carbohydrates and to eat the same number of carbohydrates at ...


6

You are confusing terms here. Baker's percentages are used for bread and bread only. In pastry baking, ratio is even more important as in bread, but traditionally, nobody calles it "baker's percentages". The book you want is Ruhlman's Ratio. It gives exactly the information you want for pastry and some other things (noodles, mayonnaise). About the only ...


6

The modern way is still to sieve. I actually did this a couple of days ago. I made a sauce out of boiled onions, capiscums, chilli peppers, canned plum tomatoes, carrots, garlic, ginger and spices. This was then whizzed in a blender and sieved through a fine metal sieve to remove the pulp, seeds, large fibrous pieces that wern't blended. It makes for a ...


5

Khymos is a fantastic resource, and has probably the best collection of recipes out there at the moment. There's also a lot of good stuff at the French Cullinary Institute's Cooking Issues blog. They've got a good post on hydrocolloids that's quite enlightening. I actually disagree on the McGee recommendations. While it's an excellent book, full of great ...


5

So, my other question was more general techniques and advise ... but for the actual cookbook question ... the whole 'cooking for one' has been a pet peeve of mine for some time (I missed getting my entry together for the first Food Network Star competition, and they have a restriction in the application form that's kept me from entering ever since) But, a ...


4

Authentic is a myth and a moving target. Bless your food with delicious instead. Cooking is using what's around and tastes good. All cuisines evolve. If you want to approximate traditional dishes, consult a nutritional anthropology text or a culinary historian (they exist, really). More practically, ask a Mexican. (Or a Swede. Or a Brit... Per the ...


4

I'm an Asian American who grew up in the States but came from a very Taiwanese family (and visit quite often). And in my experience, only "authentic Asians" like "authentic Asian food". Obviously there are exceptions, but realize it's authentic because people grew up eating it. One example is the pickled radishes. They're gross. But because people in ...


4

Authentic is a very slippery question. Recipes change over time, and even the most down-home recipes are prepared differently from village to village and even house to house. As far as I know, cilantro and lime are very typical ingredients in guacamole - they are certainly included in both the Diana Kennedy and Rick Bayless standard versions, and those ...



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