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24

First, use self-rising flour or use 1 teaspoon of baking powder added to each cup of all-purpose flour that you're using for the dredging and coating mixture. The carbon dioxide produced during frying will cause the coating to expand and become more flaky. If you want more tender and flavorful chicken, first brine the pieces in buttermilk that has been ...


23

It's actually hard to hold when it's almost all the way cooked -- it'll start getting gluey on you if you let it cool off, but could start scorching on the bottom if it's not stirred, and get too runny if you keep adding stock. I saw a show and Mario Bitali said that risotto isn't finicky in the middle -- so you can cook it part way, cool it down (I think ...


16

Many restaurants actually serve a "light" version of the Tso sauce, and I have a pretty strong feeling that's what you're used to. To make the light version, you use 3x the corn starch and add 1/2 cup of the base liquid (usually chicken broth). The hint of sesame almost certainly came from toasted sesame oil, my favourite "secret ingredient" that goes into ...


13

It is not "food color" in the conventional sense. McDonald's techniques are based on something the 'home cook' can rarely achieve, consistency. Their friers are designed to maintain exactly the same temperature (375F, if I recall correctly). The typical home frier drops 20-30F as soon as food is added, the McMachines have the kind of heating elements that ...


11

If the English curry is similar to this, you are missing CREAM!


11

McDonald's' et al pies are essentially fried pies, a feature of Southern US cooking, adapted for cooking in fast food facilities. A Google search for 'fried apple pie recipes' turns up plenty of results. Try this: http://southernfood.about.com/od/apples/r/bl90416c.htm


10

My guess is that the chicken is a variation on chicken kebabs. These are often made by marinating the chicken in yogurt with garlic and turmeric. The same technique can be used for chicken on the bone. I'm not sure for the rice -- maybe someone else can help out? The hot sauce is most likely harissa. This is a generic term for a number of spicy sauces ...


10

That's not batter, that's yeast dough. It is called Мекица (transliteration: mekitza) in Bulgarian, Google Translate says the Serbian word is Колачи (transliteration: kolachi), which I find somewhat strange, as in Bulgarian, колачета is a different food. Maybe somebody can supply the correct Serbian word (or affirm that kolachi is correct). In itself, it is ...


9

Use double or triple that volume of spices, and gentle dry roast them first Use ghee (clarified butter) instead of oil Use loads of cream to finish the gravy


9

I'm serbian and KOLACI means cake in Serbian. What you are looking for iz MEKIKE in balkan countries and it is called USHTIPAK plural: USHTIPCI in SERBIA


8

Two things: (1) Pass the tortillas through hot oil first, for just a few seconds. That will soften them and also "waterproof" them. It is the traditional technique. (2) Consider making them on a griddle instead of in the oven; preheat the sauce and the filling, soften the tortilla, fill, heat for just a few more seconds, place on top of the sauce on a ...


8

Usually when I've made them I just put sauce on top, not on the bottom, and just down the middle so the edges are exposed. And I make the sauce on the thick side so it is not too watery. I bake them in the oven too, and they are never too soggy, but you could just grill to minimise the sauce absorption. I've heard that corn tortillas are more resistant ...


8

As ever, it depends on the exact recipe. It seems to me that garlic is conspicuously missing from your list of ingredients, though. Additionally, you could try very small amount (1/4 teaspoon for a medium put to start) of the following spices: Cloves Turmeric Cinnamon Cardamom (this really sorted out a dish I was making yesterday that was tasting a little ...


7

The way to get crispy chicken is double breading the chicken and immersion frying. Basically, you need a tub with your flour and seasonings in it, a basin for water and someplace to place the breaded product. You should also invest in a shaker basket of some sort (you can use a strainer or whatever you have that you can put chicken in and clean afterwards ...


7

For a chewy pizza base, use bread flour. Do not use oil. Bread flour has a higher protein content that will help gluten form. Gluten makes the connections that keep dough together. Fat inhibits gluten formation. A recipe of just water, flour, salt, and yeast mixed, kneaded, allowed to rise until doubled, and then rolled out will get you what you want. ...


7

UPDATE: OK, I made my version of the sauce twice, I learned a little bit from my first attempt, so I'm going to walk you through my second. Although the ingredients in the stir-fry are vastly different (I had some left over chicken and I have a thing for frozen peas), I think the ingredients and technique I'm demonstrating here will work fine for you as ...


6

The most detailed French fry investigation I have ever seen comes from the French Culinary Institute's Tech 'N Stuff Blog. You can read The Quest for French Fry Supremacy Part 1 and The Quest for French Fry Supremacy Part 2 for a complete overview not only of their technique but also of the hows and whys behind the decisions they made.


6

Restaurants in general use WAY more salt than home cooks do. I'd try increasing the salt and see what happens to the flavour. The same is often true of butter. Also, some restaurants that publish recipes, do not actually publish something that is faithful to what they serve. I noticed it with a dish with which I was very familiar from a favourite ...


6

According to a quick search on Google, there are two other types of vinegar served in fish and chips shops along with malt vinegar. The first (and my best guess) is onion vinegar -- which is white vinegar that has been used to pickle onions. This is clear, but at minimum contains onions and salt, and perhaps sugar and other pickling spices. (I should note ...


6

Espresso, steamed milk. It isn't a complicated recipe at all, but it does require some equipment and technique. Espresso: You need to use an espresso roast coffee that is finely ground. If you like Starbucks, then buy a pound from them. Milk: There are a whole bunch of beverages made out of coffee and steamed milk. My joke about Italians is that every ...


6

The chai tea latte at Starbucks is made from the Tazo Chai Tea Latte concentrate. This product is available at supermarkets and online, and is mixed with milk to make a product not unlike what you have at Starbucks (minus the foam, as you pointed out). So, what are these flavors (say, if you wanted to make this from scratch)? The website mentions that the ...


6

If your noodles are mushy, then you're overcooking them. Vermicelli take barely a minute or two to cook in already-boiling water. Egg noodles take a little longer, but either way, trying the noodles as they start to loosen up is the best way to ensure the right texture. Remember, you are going to be cooking them again when you stir fry them, so they should ...


6

Here is Kenji Alt's in-depth recreation of the double-double animal-style burger. The core of his technique is: The process is simple: Sear the patty on one side, and squirt some mustard on it as it sizzles. Flip the patty over so that the mustard cooks into the second side. The patties are covered with the cheese, then the caramelized onions ...


6

Meat in stir-fries is often velveted. That makes for a supremely soft chunk of meat, and it can be done with any type of meat. This answer actually addresses chicken: How to cook extremely soft chicken?, but it applies just as well to beef. It's usually done with egg and cornstarch, but sometimes it's done with a small amount baking soda instead, as in this ...


5

Personally i think you should aspire to make one better than the curry house. I think the trick is to use as much fresh spices as possible - make your own Garam Masalla and just use this instead of all your other spices. we toast cumin, coriander, mustard seeds, fennel, one clove, and about 8 cardimon pods. or what ever takes my fancy at the time then ...


5

I am a cook in an Italian restaurant. We cook risotto to order, from scratch in under 20 minutes. You need a hot pan, hot stock and a hot French top/burner. It's easy. Add onion, butter, olive oil, salt and pepper, sweat the onion (it in your already hot pan). Add rice, toast and deglaze the pan. add stock, cream, salt. Come back in 10-15 minutes (All that ...



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