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16

I also liked home cooking and thought it would be a good idea to try it professionally, and here's what I learned: The best way to learn to cook professionally is by getting an entry level job. This is what I did. People will hire you without experience if you seem humble, reliable, and willing to learn. Come in cocky or expecting a lot right in the door, ...


15

What you describe is grill basting - where a liquid is poured onto the grill and covered (with a metal salad bowl or a basting cover) to more evenly cook the food and maintain its moisture. The liquid is added towards the latter half of cooking, as adding it in the first half of cooking has no real beneficial effect. Additionally, the steam will melt cheese ...


15

I have worked in two professsional kitchens. The main kitchen itself (all the work tables, stoves, floors, refrigerator fronts and so on) is cleaned after each service, and very thoroughly each night with hot soapy water and sometime sterilizing solution. The insides of refrigerators and other storage areas don't need to be cleaned that often because ...


15

3 star restaurants are a business (*); for (probably bad) example, if I was to buy a Tesla car, I would not expect Elon Musk to build my car or even be at the auto-dealer. Chefs will rarely cook; they will create the dishes, they might cook the prototypes and do trial plating to show his staff how the dish should cooked and presented; and the team will do ...


11

It totally depends on who's leading the kitchen. I've worked in a restaurant where we cleaned the fridges, floors, everything twice a day. A quickish clean after lunch service, and a full clean at night. In most other places I've worked, the fridges were done once a day, and the whole kitchen after each service. Regardless, you'll do what's called a 'deep ...


8

Near as I can tell, it's probably the local economics. It seems to me that the cost is different per "component" but would probably balance out in the end. Chinese food, generally speaking, relies more on fresh vegetables (carrots, peas, bean-sprouts, broccoli etc.) and meat. This means that the storage costs and spoilage costs are higher relative to Indian ...


8

As a chef, the bigger question I would have is how are they serving sunny-side up eggs buffet style without them breaking to pieces and making a mess in the chafing dish? I wouldn't ever put them on a buffet or suggest doing them for a large group but it can be done. Most likely they are baking them on sheet pans in the oven or doing them in what we call ...


8

It's not a bad question. You can always ask, you're a customer, no harm done in asking. Asking or assuming that he/she will personally cook your food would be an entirely different matter. The Chef does not do Everything. Just approach it from a different direction: If The Chef thinks his kitchen is in good hands while absent, why shouldn't you? He/she ...


7

You have mentioned in your comments that you don't rest steak. This is why it leaks the red liquid when you cut it. Any good restaurant will rest your steak, hence them being less leaky. This Serious Eats article explains very well why you should rest steak (and any other meat). Essentially, as the meat cools, the shape of its fibers changes, allowing it to ...


7

I believe you're thinking of "mignardises." This is what they call it on the french laundry menu, and others. Another possibility is "Petit Fours", which are small pastries typically served at the end of a meal. I believe there is some overlap in the use of the two terms.


7

Chefs are really fast at cooking. It's what they do. A chef can almost effortlessly crack an egg with one-hand in about a second. Scrambled eggs would be pre-cracked and beaten prior to the cooking-shift.


6

Having worked in Institutional Kitchens, I'd bet the rent that the garlic came from kilo plastic jars of the minced preserved variety. Restaurants of some quality cut up there own raw as needed for each sauce or even for each order. A paste of roasted garlic can be made daily with several heads of garlic covering the needs of a dinner shift.


6

As Rumtscho said in her comment, much seafood is frozen on the boat before it even gets ashore, let alone into a restaurant. However, it is possible to keep seafood fresh using another method. Good seafood restaurants will have live food in tanks ready for eating. I often go to such restaurants and pick out my fish or crab from a tank and watch as the waiter ...


5

When I worked the wheel at a local restaurant, we served 4oz medallions of filet mignon that went from fridge directly to grill. Only took about 5 minutes on each side, then the steak was plated and sent to the table. There was no "wait until room temp", oven or rest stage. The rest stage wasn't necessary because we weren't pre-slicing the steak before ...


5

Depends on the restaurant and the labour available and the quantities needed. If you have staff standing around for an hour each day waiting for things to happen then you buy the whole bulbs and let the staff peel. If you need greater amounts faster you buy pre-peeled. Both would then have you chop the peeled garlic in a food processor with a touch of oil ...


4

In my Navy service, where the galley tends to roll with the waves, we did a lot of cleaning. A quick clean after breakfast, wipe surfaces and the insides of the line fridges. A deeper clean after lunch, including scrubbing the surfaces, emptying and cleaning the line fridges properly, scrubbing the stove top (electric), and sorting out the deep-fryer. ...


4

I think Carmi's answer is a pretty good theory for the differences between Indian and Chinese restaurants. It makes sense to me that labor- and time-intensive Indian cooking makes Indian restaurants more expensive than quick-cooking Chinese ones. To add on to that, I'm wondering if the number of different spices and their costs plays a role, too. Like ...


4

Your question is actually a more general topic under food quality. The concept is either called stock rotation or just-in-time(for manufacturing). You simply need to anticipate the need for the item and prepare it ahead of time, multiple times throughout the day. If you need 10 portions an hour starting at 6pm, you need to begin marinating 10 portions at ...


4

I understand the challenges of running a small restaurant, I've experienced the extremes of the problems. During tourist season I always hired help, but during winter it was just me - Bartender, waitress, cook, dishwasher, bookkeeper, janitor - you name it. Occasionally buses would pull up and unload 30 people on me at once, of course I was never prepped for ...


3

This is where low temperature cooking (most people call is sous vide, but it is usually a misnomer) can be your friend. You could cook the burgers until done. Chill. Then flash off on grill or even in fryer before service.


3

A good restaurant will have a thorough clean after each service. Of course, not every restaurant is a good one...


3

Two massive pans (15 eggs in one pan at a time) on a low heat with lots of oil, yes its sounds oily and unhealthy but it makes mass egg cooking possible. Slow cook the eggs to perfection, just make sure to drain off the oil for perfectly cooked sunny side up eggs. I do this every morning and go through about 200+ eggs a day in a buffet style, and people ...


3

From personal experiance, I cooked on a flat top with six 8" pans for two to three eggs and three 7" pans for single egg orders. I had one frying pan with an insert for poached egg orders. Avoid electric grills, gas is much better, but a steam griddle like the AccuTemp is best as they hold a uniform temperature much better. Use an IR thermometer to make ...


3

'fast food' chinese contains a lot of cheap beansprouts and noodles or rice. Even take away indian contains a lot more sauce and meat.


2

It really depends on what you're keeping in the fridge. In my Navy days, we basically had areas for different type of products, which were organized differently. What we used to do was more or less this: Vegetables: This is more or less per vegetable, but worked for us. For instance the carton of tomatoes or cucumbers next in line was on a middle shelf, ...


2

As far as I have experienced steaks are rarely brought to room temperature before cooking except for steaks cooked 'bleu' or 'blue'. You also have to consider that kitchen equipment deliver much more heat than your regular domestic stove. Furthermore the cooking equipment eg chargrills, stoves, flat grills, etc... are always on, hot and ready to cook. In ...


2

I've no idea about a standard, but a 90-seat restaurant where I used to work served a veal chop intended for 2-3 people by cooking it sous vide to 130F, then finishing on the grill to medium. We could thereby get a piece of meat that would have to grill or roast for at least 45 minutes to the table in around 15, and the sealed chops could be kept in their ...


2

One could also cook the steak "low temp" or "sous vide" to the desired doneness, then chill. In this case a high heat sear on a grill or flat top would only take a minute per side, to brown or form crust...greatly decreasing the time it takes from order to plate.


2

Quite simply, "the chef is not there" ⇒ "the taste is not the same" seems to be a logical fallacy. I suppose that could be true – if the food you ordered required special skills that we assume could only be replicated by the head chef. But I think that's unlikely to reflect reality. The quality of the restaurant as a whole is more likely to hinge ...



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