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14

I rarely ever recommend boiling the heck out of meat. You are washing away all of the flavor. Remember water is a solvent and remove everything from the meat if it is left to boil long enough. For the most tender ribs I would recommend a braise. The slow, low, moist cooking of a braise is perfect for breaking down connective tissue in the ribs without ...


11

Your ribs will have a lot less flavor if you do not use a dry rub. However you can minimize some of the time (and only a bit of the flavor) by putting on the rub, wrapping in foil, and immediately putting them in the oven or on the grill. The process of putting your rub together probably takes only about 5 minutes - it's the fridge time that takes a while. ...


11

Yes, there's a risk, but it's not significantly higher than having most other home appliances turned on (eg, a lamp, dehumidifier, dish washer or dryer). Although it heats up, a full-sized oven is insulated, and you're not operating at a very high temperature. Provided it seals well, even if there's a fire, there would be little oxygen to sustain it. I ...


9

When cooking Chinese ribs, they are usually boiled down... (I am a cook from Hong Kong) We usually cut the ribs bone-attached into small cubes before cooking, quite unlike the western cooking style. stir-frying: Usually we stir-fry the rib with a sauce of choice; black bean and chili is my favourite. One can also use the sweet-sour (sometimes with the ...


9

I'm confused. You don't want fake smoke but you don't want to use wood? Are you asking for a synthetic substance you can burn that will not be worse for the environment than burning wood? First of all- burning wood is not bad for the environment- that carbon has not been sequestered and so it would be released into the atmosphere anyway when the wood ...


7

I am assuming that you have actual goat ribs, like pork ribs, and not a rack of goat chops. I had a full goat breast that I just cooked them the other day. If you just broil them as you describe they will be tasty...and tough...and greasy. You want to treat these like pork ribs, needing a slow cook. I first smoke my ribs, then braise them, then finish ...


7

i made a smoked salmon recently that used tea leaves (from tea bags, specifically chai and a black tea with citrus), and it was very subtle and awesome. highly recommended. i used, i believe, 3 tea bags total, plus 2T of brown sugar and 2T of white rice in a lightly folded foil packet.


6

The key is to slow-cook them on low heat, and keep the lid/door closed for at least two hours. Here's my fool-proof method for fall-off-the-bone baby back ribs that anyone can do... Make sure you know where to get good fresh pork (pay the cost to be the boss) Cut membrane off the bone-side of the slab (optional, I don't like its chewiness) Use your ...


6

The secret is simple: Cook them slowly, at lower temperatures.


6

Even given a standardized recipe and method, cooking times are always only a guideline. Quality recipes always give you a test for knowing when the product is done. The reason for this is that there are many uncontrolled (at least from the recipe author's point of view) such as, in the case of ribs: Exact dimensions of the ribs Natural variation in the ...


5

The collagen in the ribs needs to get to a temperature of about 160 F to start breaking down into water and gelatin. If your oven can be set as low as 175 or 180 F on a normal bake or convection bake setting that is probably a better alternative unless you have access to an oven thermometer and can measure what temperature the warm setting on your oven ...


5

I can kind of go either way on this. I like to cook my ribs low and slow with smoke, which takes a couple of hours. However, I'm not sure that par-boiling will really improve this cooking time. So I'd say no for low and slow technique. My mother boils her ribs first and then grills them. In this case, they cook in the liquid and really just finish on the ...


5

Did you rinse the ribs well enough before cooking? Brined food should be rinsed several times to remove brining solids from the surface of the food before cooking.


5

I'd personally go with a standard carving set: Very sharp non serrated long carving knife and a carving fork to help hold the meat steady without getting in-there with your hands. Assuming you're right handed I'd start on the right with the with the ribs running up away from you, maybe slightly pointing to the left. Then cut along the bone, close to the ...


5

There are three issues here: The quality of the food The safety of the food The safety of your home Food Quality From a palatability perspective, you may or may not get a decent result, depending on how high the internal temperature of the ribs rises. 180 F is very close to the temperature that needs to be achieved to effectively convert gelatin into ...


5

The goal with ribs is "low and slow" cooking to break down connective tissue. But a quick sear will help to lock in juices and provide a good smoky flavor. I find it's preferable to do this first so that the smokiness can work its way into the meat over the slow cook to come. After seasoning, I would start with a sear on your grill over direct heat (8-10 ...


5

It's the smoker. I had one of these, and it is extremely flawed in design. The pan that holds the charcoal does not allow for proper air flow to the fuel. Contrast this with a Weber grill, where you put your fuel on an elevated grate with plenty of air beneath it. This Char Broil instead just has a pan that you put on a shelf. Before long your coals are ...


4

Basically you'll want to marinate the ribs in a hoison/soy sauce combo. You can find hoison sauce in most stores in the U.S. Other than that it is just cooking ribs the way you might normally cook them. That caramelization is the sugar from the hoison sauce caramelizing ont he rib's "crust" or outer layer. To get that, just make sure the ribs end their ...


4

For ribs or for that matter most anything you need to go to "the source" for food related questions: Harold McGee He did an excellent post in the New York Times about cooking ribs: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/30/dining/30curious.html?scp=1&sq=Curious%20Cook&st=cse Here is his recipe for Smoky Oven Spare ribs: ...


4

To achieve "done" pork ribs should reach an internal temp of 160°F (71ºC). The longer it takes to get there be more tender they will be. I would not recommend going any lower than 200°F (93ºC) for your cooking temp, even if that means turning the heat up a little at the end to reach your internal temp of 160°F. Put a good rub on, wrap the racks of ribs ...


4

There is no problem with the brine, smoke, sous vide process as long as he pays attention to typical/safe temperatures. I would sous vide then smoke and probably return to a hot grill, rather than sear, but that is personal preference. What would be unusual would be a return to the brine after the smoking. While it could be made safe from a food-safety ...


3

I just happened across this older question and found the answers provided, including the information in the link to wikipedia to be incorrect. All Prime Ribs are Standing Rib Roasts, not all Standing Rib Roasts are Prime Rib. A "Prime Rib" is a standing rib roast, from a beef that has achieved a USDA Grade of "Prime". Bone-In or Bone-out are separate ...


3

Prime rib can be either a steak sliced from the roast or the entire roast. In other words, it isn't a precise term. The standing rib roast is more precise. You can get more than one prime rib steak from the standing rib roast. The standing rib roast must have come from at least 2 of the ribs. A rib eye roast is a standing rib roast with the ribs ...


3

It probably will save some time, but I tend to think that boiling meat makes for a rather bland, ropey final product (collagen dissolves from the meat, leaving it stingy rather than juicy). I would suggest just baking them beforehand. You can bake them (low heat, wrapped in foil) days before you intend to serve them and keep them in the refrigerator. Finish ...


3

I think the most important thing is to make sure your knife is sharp. I would also make sure you let the ribs rest for 10 minutes or so. Then, you should be able to stand them on edge, with the tips up in the air and cut down cleanly between the bones. If your ribs are are pulling away from the bone too much for this, then you can lay them flat with the bone ...


3

I use this guy's technique for grilling ribs, which calls for 5-6 hours at 225°F (105°C) on a grill or smoker (3-4 hours for baby backs). I've done them many times this way and they're absolutely delicious. I don't see any problem at all upping that to 7 hours and lowering the temp to 200°F (95°C). I wouldn't wrap them in foil or add liquid, but I probably ...


3

Brining pork—especially a thin cut like ribs—before barbecuing (in the low and slow sense) is not traditional. To see why, you have to understand the functions (and myths) about brining: It helps retain moisture. This is true. Water enters the meat cells during the brining process. Not all of this water will come out during the cooking ...


3

While you could do this. A better method(Provided you have an enclosed grill) would be to set your grill up for indirect heat and slow cook them on your grill. This is how I do ribs and it works amazingly. You'll have to do things slightly differently if you have a square or round grill. For a round grill try the following: Place unlit briquettes around ...


3

When you approach the low end of the low-and-slow cooking methods, a concern that is normally not an issue in faster cooking methods starts becoming important: how long will it take the food to get to safe temperature? You want the food to be above 140 F (60 C) for the entirety of the cooking process, for safety, although having that happen instantly is ...



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