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16

You've stated that you're not washing the rice. That's the reason this is happening. Water boils over because of starch. Many types of rice (brown rice included) can be very starchy, and this could conceivably cause the water to boil over depending on the amount of rice/water and the size of the pan (or rice cooker). Washing the rice also helps to ...


15

Yes there are benefits! This is one of my most used pieces of kitchen equipments. Here is a list of benefits for a quality rice cooker: Never burns rice No guess measurements for all kinds of rice Scheduled cooking Keep warm settings Uniform cooking When I cook rice on my stove, even at the lowest of heats, I get a thin layer of rice that has overcooked ...


11

A dedicated rice cooker works by measuring the internal temperature as the rice steams and water boils away. In my mind the greatest benefit is that different types of rice that have different cooking times will be cooked correctly in a rice cooker. Another benefit is that you can start the rice early and the cooker will keep it warm after it's done cooking ...


10

Volume Volume is usually the primarily advertised statistic for rice cookers. This indicates the volume of cooked rice that can be prepared in one cycle. Common sizes include 5.5 cups and 10 cups. 5.5 cups is completely adequate for a family of five people for a single meal. Bowl quality Bowls in entry-level models are typically aluminum. Higher end ...


10

Rice cookers are quite versatile and cooking Quinoa would not ruin the rice cooker if you do indeed want to experiment. A rice cooker works because there is a springloaded thermal sensor plate at the bottom of where the metal pot sits(only if it is automatic. Some rice cookers have a switch to flip to go into the heating process). This will then start the ...


9

I've cooked white rice, brown rice, wild rice, whole Oat Groats (2 brown rice cycles + a little extra water on cycle two) , rye groats, Khorasan wheat (kamut), barley, Spelt, and numerous other seeds in my fuzzy logic rice cooker, but never Quinoa. It seems to me the white Quinoa seed benefits from a short cook time, and a long post-cooking expansion time. A ...


8

You can combine it with practically everything, so the question is somewhat broad. So my answer is equally broad: rice pairs well with fresh tastes and acidity, or with moderately sweet components. Or you can just underline its own slightly nutty notes. Below is a list of specific examples, but it is impossible to make it exhaustive. For fresh tastes, use ...


8

Well, coming from a Chinese family and as our family cook rice everyday... The short answer is yes - you will be able to cook 1 cup with the 5.5 cup model. the problem is, though you will be able to cook much smaller volume in a large cooker -- you will have rice covering the pan, a thin layer above bare metal[1]. Scooping up rice from it is a OK, but you ...


8

As I note in my answer here, I use the exact model you are considering. It is one of the best gadgets I've purchased. It has no problem making any batch down to 1 cup in size. Being able to cook the full 5.5 cups when entertaining is invaluable as well. I will sometimes cook more than I need for lunch the next day, as well as making fried rice for the ...


7

It is possible to use a rice cooker to prepare rice from boxes but it is not optimal. These box rices typically call for the mixture to be first browned in butter before adding water and flavoring because it is not all rice. There are bits of pasta in the mixture too. The rice cooker is able to cook it but the result probably will not be as good. It is very ...


6

Anything will cook in a rice cooker, eventually. You will need to experiment with the size of the meat chunks. When the meal is done cooking, take them out and see if they are cooked and at the correct temperature. If not, finish cooking them and cut them up smaller next time. What I would do however is cube the meat, sear it, and then throw it in to the ...


6

This is what I do for cooking ONE cup rice: Soak one cup rice in one and a half cup water for 20 minutes. This should be done after rinsing the rice properly since, the water used for soaking is NOT to be thrown away. After 20 minutes put the vessel with the existing water on the gas stove (with a loose lid on) on a high heat. When the water reaches ...


6

It depends a lot on the vegetable. For frozen peas, I add them just when the cycle finishes; fold them in and close the pot, and 3 minutes later they are steamed to perfection. For a harder vegetable, like a raw carrot, or one where you want more breakdown, like onion, add it at the beginning. You don't really want to open the rice cooker a bunch of times ...


6

There shouldn't need to be any variation in the water at all, since the things that you are adding are already hydrated and are not taking in any water. Indeed, it would be possible that some vegetables might even give off water. I would be more inclined to look to whether you are measuring accurately every time you use the rice cooker (just asking) and ...


6

It is perfectly okay to eat. I am going to assume when you cook rice, the rice comes out a bit too moist. The "film" is literally the water and the starch from the rice that has dried and turned into a thin film of rice starch. If you like your rice the way it currently is, then there is nothing to worry about. But if it indeed is too moist, then decrease ...


6

Assuming you bought a rice cooker designed by a Japanese company (and apparently even other brands tend to meet that market's expectations), the measurement is 1-gou, slightly more than 180ml, which is traditionally the size of a sake cup, and is closely associated with a historical sake bottle size (approximately 1.8l) ...


6

There is no risk to the Teflon itself, or from it; PTFE breaks down at about 500 F, which rice cookers will not achieve, especially on warming setting. Other than that, PTFE is one of the most inert substances known to man, as the atoms are already bound in energetically very favorable bonds: little is as able to displace them without significant input ...


5

Not really any reason not to go for the bigger one, you should definetly be able to make 2 cups in it. If there are bad results when you do only 1 cup then you may have to always do 2 and have leftovers but I can't imagine that being a problem. It probably does use more power, if that is a concern.


5

Hot water and detergent might be enough, but after serious mold growth, I'd use a disinfectant. The easiest way to do this would be to disinfect your cooker with bleach, which is very effective at killing mold on non-porous surfaces. After thoroughly washing and rinsing your cooker, make a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part bleach and allow it to soak in ...


4

One thing to try is to let the cooked rice rest for a while. My rice cooker's pot is non-Teflon and scratched, but I've found that if I remove it from the heating element and let it rest 15-30 minutes, there is virtually no sticking. If I try to remove the rice immediately, there is significant sticking.


4

A pre-made dry seasoning for rice that is popular in Japan is Furikake. This is a seaweed based flavoring that is sprinkled on top or mixed into rice after it finishes cooking. There are many varieties but the simplest ones are made with only seaweed flakes, salt and sugar and occasionally sesame seeds.


4

I haven't done it myself, but since the "goodness" of a cake is largely subjective, I think you should try it and see what happens. Be scientific about it: if you don't like it, change a variable and try again. A cursory search on youtube might also help. Here is one I found: Zojirushi Mother's Day Cake


4

You can make an Indian-style pilau with turmeric, cumin seeds, ground coriander, cloves, cardamom pods, a bay leaf, half a cinnamon stick, salt, and a little cubed butter for richness. Add raisins 15 minutes before serving for sweetness, and scatter some toasted sliced almonds on top when it's done: delicious.


4

Rice cookers usually use the "absorption method", in which by the end of the cooking, all of the water has been absorbed into the rice. If, by the time the rice is the texture you want, there is still liquid in the pan, then you used too much water. But it's OK; just pour the excess away and leave it a couple of minutes for the rest to absorb/evaporate. If ...


4

I have one of the Cuckoo cookers with a Turbo mode. The one (slight) downside is that white rice will come out a bit more... gooey? with the Turbo cooking. It's not bad and seems to primarily affect smaller batches. If you let the rice rest a bit and plan on tossing it with oil or butter (or just don't mind stickier rice), it's definitely workable.


3

In my experience, rice quality has a pretty substantial amount of variation, but the cooking device has little to do with it. While I'm sure that most rice cookers on the market from Japanese firms are optimized and tested for short-grain, japonica rice, I've never had issues cooking basmati or jasmine rice in one, and I've even used them for farro and ...


3

I have been using Rick cooker for my whole life. The simple answer I can give you is the problem of your rice cooker. There are older models of rice cooker that sticks a lot and there is very little you can do about it. It happened to me when I was little that some of the rice cookers just did that regardless of what we did. The newer models won't do it ...


3

Easy! I steam fish about 1x per week with a bamboo steamer. You need to take advantage of the steam rising from the pot which can steam your fish in exactly the same way as the rice cooker - so you get a Bamboo Steamer like this one (available in tons of different places, including cooking-supply stores, Asian Foods stores, etc): ...


3

Most American households don't have rice cookers - it's just not part of traditional American kitchens. Most Asian-American households probably do. Some reasonable fraction of people likely to make sushi do - but probably not all. But this seems beside the point. Cooking rice in a pot is simple, and won't take a significant amount of work to explain. Why ...


3

Almost certainly: lots of recipes online. I'd go with the 'porridge' or 'brown rice setting' if your cooker has it. Concensus on water ratio seems to be about same as for rice. Here's a question which lists More things you can cook in a rice cooker. With a quality cooker, you can also make baked beans and tasty onion soup.



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