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42

There are really only a few secrets to good fried rice: Day Old White Rice (Make it the day before, let it cool, place it in the fridge) This I'd say is absolutely, the main thing. The texture will NOT be right if you use freshly cooked rice. There will be too much moisture. HEAT! Your Wok needs to be hot. You want everything to cook quickly. Cook ...


34

It removes excess starch, so your sushi rice doesn't turn into nasty glutinous slop. The texture of the rice is very important, so you'll need to rinse it several times before you steam it. Make sure the water is nice and clear after the last time you rinse it, and make sure you buy japonica or similar: if you use regular rice, you may not get good results. ...


30

For me it isn't fried rice without toasted sesame oil, and the fried rice I have had in restaurants always tastes to me as if it contains toasted sesame oil. Peas are pretty required too. BTW, La Choy is synthetic soy sauce, it was at the very bottom of the America's Test Kitchen taste testing of soy sauce (sorry, paywalled), the only soy sauce to get a "not ...


26

I would throw it out. The rice doesn't cost as much as a new digestive system. Sure, it's a waste. And I'm sure you would look very carefully. But the risk of one glass splinter still in it is existent. Therefore, I wouldn't try it. Good luck with cleaning that up though. :)


24

Depends on the rice, of course - here are the most common types: White rice: 2:1 Brown rice: 1.5:1 Jasmine rice: 1.1:1 Wild rice: 4:1, but immediately wash with cold water and drain when done.


22

Try cooking your rice with a flavorful liquid. My favorite is homemade chicken/vegetable stock, but you can buy any kind of chicken or beef broth at the store and it will add a lot of flavor as well. You could also try experimenting with combinations of other liquids, such as wines and vinegars. A pat of butter will also help add some flavor. Another ...


22

People choose to eat vegetarian diets for a number of reasons. Not only might the flavor offend your guest, but it may cause them to be physically ill. You can substitute vegetable stock or broth for the meat products you are accustomed to using. Mushrooms lend a meaty flavor to dishes they are used in and could potentially be used to replace your meat. I ...


20

One of my favorite recipes is Giada De Laurentis' Wild Mushroom with Peas. It's rather simple, but amazingly delicious. The most common flubs when making a risotto are overcooking or dumping in all the liquid at once. I always use the wooden spoon test to determine when the risotto is finished. First, stir often! Periodically drag your spoon down the ...


20

I always find rice a disappointment when I am out and about, because people boil it. Growing up I never had plain boiled rice, as my family always made an onion rice, like a pilau. This needs a wide lidded saute/frying pan, say 10-12" wide, 2" deep. Chop a large onion, soften in butter, wash 1/2 pint basmati rice till water runs clean (in a sieve), then ...


20

This is based on what I was taught by a Chinese cook when I worked in his restaurant at age seventeen. Any compliments should be directed at old Tommy Wu. Any complaints may be due to my imperfect memory. His process was both similar and different in some respects from yours. Use day-old cooked cold white rice. Spending the night refrigerated will make ...


18

Quinoa. I only recently discovered it as part of doing P90X, and man, it's so, so delicious. It's kind of a nutty flavour that goes really well with sauces. It's also pretty high in protein, which is good. Note that this isn't "no-carb", though it is lower in carbs than rice. It's important that you wash quinoa before you prepare it. Otherwise, it's ...


17

The typical issue with risotto is that it requires attention -- it's considered a problematic dish because you're supposed to stir it almost constantly. The issue is that you need to get enough starch off the rice to get it to be creamy, so you want to keep only a little bit of liquid in there at any time, so that you can keep the grains rubbing up against ...


16

You've stated that you're not washing the rice. That's the reason this is happening. Water boils over because of starch. Many types of rice (brown rice included) can be very starchy, and this could conceivably cause the water to boil over depending on the amount of rice/water and the size of the pan (or rice cooker). Washing the rice also helps to ...


16

Well in Chinese cooking we use a wide variety actually. Typically speaking... Medium or Long Grain Rice White Rice Fried Rice Sweet Rice or Glutinous Rice Sticky Rice (You commonly see this at Dim Sum places in the sticky rice dishes wrapped in lotus leaves, among other places.) There are others of course, but those are the common ones you'll find ...


16

Once you get the hang of it, rice is as easy as pasta. One thing you say in the question that may be central to the difficulty you are having is that your lid is "half-closed". For the majority of rice cooking methods, not only should you keep the lid tightly closed, but you shouldn't even open it to check the rice until it has cooked close to long enough ...


15

There isn't really a simple answer to this question due to the many variables of personal preference, rice type, water hardness, etc. I suggest buying a proper rice cooker: Zojirushi NP-HBC10 5-1/2-Cup Rice Cooker and Warmer with Induction Heating System, Stainless Steel. (I love mine!) The rice cooker has precise instructions and measurements for each ...


15

Cauliflower rice works. There are lots of variations, but basically you grate cauliflower and boil it in lightly salted water for 1-2 minutes. Add some butter. Mine looks something like this: Cauliflower rice with chicken


15

Yes there are benefits! This is one of my most used pieces of kitchen equipments. Here is a list of benefits for a quality rice cooker: Never burns rice No guess measurements for all kinds of rice Scheduled cooking Keep warm settings Uniform cooking When I cook rice on my stove, even at the lowest of heats, I get a thin layer of rice that has overcooked ...


15

Residual starches swell up and get sticky in hot water. This doesn't happen with cold water -- In the time it takes to wash a pot.


15

If you are only using it three times a month then this 25lbs bag may last a very long time indeed. The problem is that even white rice can eventually develop off flavors when exposed to light and air. Additionally- even if pests don't have access to the rice, it is not unlikely that the rice has some eggs on it that can hatch and spoil the whole bag. The ...


15

Purely academic (because I wouldn't even use the rice for blind baking) but just dissolve salt into the water until the rice starts to float. The glass will remain at the bottom. Give a good stir to avoid surface tension and glass-stuck-to-rice problems. Rice farmers used to do this (and probably still do in some countries) to separate out little stones and ...


15

Oil or fat is absolutely not necessary to cook rice. I suspect you may have been taught the pilaf method where the rice is first sauteed in oil or butter, and then liquid is added and the rice is fully cooked. The purpose of the pilaf method is to add depth of flavor. When making pilafs, additional herbs, spices, or aromatics (such as onions) are often ...


14

There are countless ways to make rice more flavorful. Some of the techniques I use follow: Use 50% water / 50% chicken broth (or stock) to boil the rice. Before boiling the rice, stir in some dried herbs into the uncooked rice grains. Saffron is a good choice, ditto any type of curry. Boil the rice in herbal tea rather than water. If you are slow-cooking ...


14

Rice is mostly made of starch. Starch is, in itself, a molecule made up of glucose components attached to each other. There are two types of starch: Amylose - it is a long straight chain of glucose - and amylopectin, which has a branchy and fuzzy structure. When you cook a rice which is rich in amylose, the grains stay separate. When you cook rice which is ...


14

You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to: You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice fluffy, slightly sticky rice. It can be a pain to drain ...


12

I actually recommend whole grain rice as a substitute for white rice. First, a stir-fry is just weird without rice. Second, whole grain rice tastes and acts almost exactly the same. However, the carb/fibre ratio is adjusted quite well in your favour, and you get all that nice vitamin B-1 as well. I dare say, rice is never the enemy in a diet. How many fat ...


12

It's been a while since I made sushi but 2 tablespoons does sound a little on the ridiculous side. Various other recipes use similar amounts (to each other): AllRecipes: 1 tsp salt (for 1/2 cup vinegar and 4 tbsp sugar) Alton Brown: 1 tbsp kosher salt (for 2 tbsp vinegar and 2 tbsp sugar) SushiRecipes: 1 tsp salt (for 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/2 cup sugar) ...


12

It’s a funny thing, I’ve written 2 answers this week saying you should never refrigerate leftover rice, that refrigerating rice ruins it and that you should freeze it instead. Of course there is an exception to every rule, in this case that exception would be when you want leftover, refrigerated rice. I do have a method to get that leftover refrigerated ...


11

A dedicated rice cooker works by measuring the internal temperature as the rice steams and water boils away. In my mind the greatest benefit is that different types of rice that have different cooking times will be cooked correctly in a rice cooker. Another benefit is that you can start the rice early and the cooker will keep it warm after it's done cooking ...


11

Keep your hands wet. I usually use a small bowl of water next to my prep area, and dip my fingers in whenever things get sticky.



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