Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

To prevent mushiness you need to: Always buy and cook the same brand and type of rice. Thoroughly rinse to wash off any "loose" starch. Water must run clear, not milky. Soak the rice for 20-30 minutes in plenty of cold water, then drain. For each cupful of rice use 2 cups of water and salt to taste. Bring to the boil, then simmer over a low flame with ...


0

I soak the rice in water for 30 minutes. Then, I cook two cups of the rice in three cups of water. I bring the water to a boil and add a little touch of olive oil to the water. Add rice and reduce the heat to a low level. On my gas stove, it is a level three. Level six maintains a boiling temperature to give to an idea. So, I reduce to level three and cover. ...


1

If they are completely dry, that's fine; you can buy hard dried tteok and they are shelf stable. But if they are moist, that seems very unsafe to have sitting out at room temperature for an indeterminate period of time.


-1

Best Chinese restaurants buy in bulk Basmati rice makes a hell of a differences!


1

Onigiri (rice balls) can be frozen; that's probably your best bet for long-term storage. They can be simply tossed into the fridge the night before consumption for defrosting, or you can microwave them using the defrost setting if you have microwave-safe plastic wrap. The rice gets dried out pretty fast if you try to store them without freezing them. Note ...


0

Perfect black rice in a rice cooker - I just cooked 2 cups of black rice, after a single quick rinse using a wire strainer in my Zojirushi rice cooker (fuzzy logic). I used a standard American measuring cup. I added 3 and 3/4 cups of water (vs. the standard straight 2 waters for every one unit of rice - I do this for ALL rice types as I like a fully intact ...


0

I learned to cook rice in a Chinese cooking class in college and the method is reliable... First, you have to wash it really well. Wash and rinse the rice until the water is clear. Do not use short grain rice as that is for sushi. Measure the amount of water by using your finger. Do not worry about the amount of rice. No matter how much rice you have the ...


0

Sounds like your rice is too wet when you are cooking it. Are you cooking it with lots of stock or using the absorption method? The absorption method would be better for drier rice which is what you are looking for. For the egg I would advocate doing what other people are saying and cook the egg separately then add it back in.


0

I think an easy way of having dry non sticky fried rice is to use a different kind of rice: Jasmine rice does have this sticky quality.(though cooking with less water than usual helps). Try your fried rice using "Basmati rice". This has similar flavors as Jasmine rice- but is non sticky. Also, while cooking fried rice, I usually first cook the rice about ...


1

The rice seems to stick together too much. Try washing your rice more (water should run clear.) Also, cook it until just al dente, ever so slightly under-cooked from what you would serve at the table. For the eggs, I move the rice and veg to once side of the wok after it has fried, add a bit of fresh oil to the clean side, and break and scramble the ...


1

I cook fried rice quite often and it never gets sticky (I did it just this morning). Probably the problem is that you cook the rice too much: You should stir fry the vegetables first and when ready add the meat and rice. For the eggs covering all the other flavour, I'm not really sure. How many eggs do you put in? I cook it with the vegetables: in the pan, ...


1

It sounds like you're most of the way there, you cook the rice ahead of time and put it in the fridge, which is good as fresh rice doesn't stir fry as well. Your prep for everything else seems sound. One step I would recommend is breaking the rice up with a fork or back of a large spoon to get rid of any clumps. I think it's how you are doing the egg ...


6

Rice My aunty owned a restaurant for about 15 years (she's since retired) but when I once made the rice for her in the restaurant's cooker, she told me I had put too much water. I put in the same amount as I would for when I'd make rice at home, but she said that that's incorrect. For rice at a restaurant, it ought to be drier, i.e. less water should be ...


19

This is based on what I was taught by a Chinese cook when I worked in his restaurant at age seventeen. Any compliments should be directed at old Tommy Wu. Any complaints may be due to my imperfect memory. His process was both similar and different in some respects from yours. Use day-old cooked cold white rice. Spending the night refrigerated will make ...


2

In my experience, it sounds like you're doing a lot of things right. Having cold day-old rice is key, and I also gently scramble the egg separately and then add it at the very end, tossing to combine it gently with the rest. This is just how I do it, but I add things in a different order than you list, though: first thing, I make sure my pan is as hot as I ...


3

Try spreading the rice on a tray and letting it cool briefly, just a couple of minutes, turning gently a couple of times to free the steam. Then cover with plastic wrap and pop in the fridge overnight. It will dry out and any clumps can be gently pressed out with the back of a spoon or similar.



Top 50 recent answers are included