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Can I start by saying... You need a new cook book... Regarding the question. For my taste 1tsp cloves 2tsp cinnamon 2tbsp brown sugar 1tbsp white sugar 3 Inches of Ginger How many people are you cooking for because as a "Side Dish" this seems to make a huge amount of product. As I said this is how I would do it to my taste but It's not something I've ...


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As Jolenealaska said, lots of cooks do it on purpose. I learned the Chinese method of cooking foolproof rice by soaking it for an hour or longer in an inch of water. Then pour off the soaking water and cover the rice again with 1 inch of water. Uncovered, bring the rice to a boil and cook until only large bubbles appear. At that point, turn the fire down to ...


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Add more liquid. If you're worried about diluting the flavour; mix water with a bit of the spices used in your recipe along with chicken stock/broth (if it is you're preferred cooking liquid) and let it steam. Hope this helps :)


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I did an online search for the first 10 sushi rice recipes with distinct ingredient proportions and came up with the following ratio (by weight): 1:0.08:0.16:0.02 (Raw Rice:Sugar:Vinegar:Salt) With cooked rice, 1:0.03:0.06:0.01 (Cooked Rice:Sugar:Vinegar:Salt) Or, if you prefer: For 1300g / ~6 cups Sushi Rice 400g or 2 cups of raw sushi ...


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I hover around what I think is 1:2:2 with Salt:Sugar:Rice Vinegar. Use enough so that you can coat all of your rice, but not drench it. Before cooking, rinse the rice. I believe this removes excess starch from the rice. Skipping it makes my rice sad. After cooking you fan it while folding in the sushi vinegar mixture. I believe this cools it without drying ...


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Absolutely. The brown rice, & the old rice "aged" as it is also called, cook better after they have been soaked for some time ranging between 30-60 minutes. The parboiled rice is a little different, as it MUST BE soaked for AT LEAST 1 HOUR before it can be cooked. And it cann take a soaking of up to several hours without ruining the results. Parboiled ...


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That's fine. A lot of people actually do that on purpose, it's referred to as "soaking". It will shave a bit off the cooking time and won't negatively effect the rice at all. Give it a stir before you start cooking. You can drain and rinse it too if you want, that will give you very separate, distinct grains. Use about 1/4 less water for cooking if you do it ...


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You may not be able to salvage it, but if it were me, I'd add more liquid, stir it well, cover it with tin foil, and bake in the oven. The steam from the liquid should be trapped by the tin foil and soften the hard spots. The amount of liquid you need is a guess at this point.


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Have you tried adding water to let it finish cooking?


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I just watched a YouTube video where it said to brush or spray a line of oil above the water level and it won't boil over. I have a Black and Decker Rice cooker, and there are more complaints about this cooker foaming up through the vent hole and then spraying starchy junk all over the counter and floor...so I'm sure not all rice cookers are created equal. ...


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This is from a Polynesian Chinese restaurant owner and his daughters who are chefs as well. It's black Chinese molasses or sweet sauce. This is found mostly in New England Chinese restaurants. You take rice cook it the day before and refrigerate overnight. You need a gas stove or high temp wok to obtain about 400 degrees. Stir fry your scallions, egg, ...



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