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There is only one general principle for risotto: Cook short grain rice long enough for the starches to be liberated and gelatinize. This results in the distinctive, pudding-like, creaminess. Everything else is variable and for flavor. In particular boosting the umami to heartbreaking levels. Stock and wine have more flavor than water. The alcohol in wine ...


9

The important part of making risotto is that you're moving it around in a little bit of liquid, so you end up scraping of the outside of the rice, causing the loose starch to thicken the remaining liquid to a creamy consistency. The overall dish should be creamy but not mushy, with the individual grains of rice still having some firmness to them. As for ...


3

You can usually substitute vegetable or meat stocks for the wine/alcohol in savory dishes.


12

I've made risotto plenty of times without wine (as it's not something that I typically keep in my house). The main issue is that wine is both acidic (which can affect how quickly things break down when cooking, like onions), and it's a solvent (so it helps to distribute other flavors). Although it does add some flavor on its own, you typically won't miss ...


9

Yes, all it is, is flavour. Apple juice and grape juice are 2 things I've used in the past for non-alcohol people. You can also get away with not using anything as a replacement as long as you use enough of everything else (butter and parmesan etc). Wine just gives a little depth and a sort of 'freshness'. Edit: I just read the vegetarian part of your ...


1

I love risotto. A few things might help. Use a saucepan, not a skillet. I had never really noticed a difference until ElendilTheTall (another user here) pointed it out. It makes a big difference. So you should have 2 sauce pans on the stove, one for your simmering broth, one for the rice. Brown your aromatics and your mushrooms well in butter and oil and ...



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