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7

You've got a few things to consider -- cost of the ingredients shrinkage energy costs time costs wastage So, in our decision making tree, we have to consider the real costs of each option. Say for instance that whole roasts are on sale, so the cost of a roast is 1/2 the cost of buying the deli meat. The roast is going to lose weight as it cooks ... ...


7

For the US crowd, silverside is the part of the round closest to sirloin, so it's a working cut and fairly lean. In order to keep this juicy you'll need to bard it, in other words add fat. I'd do this by wrapping the whole thing up in streaky (US style) bacon and then sear it at high temperature to give it that crust before turning it down and continue the ...


6

The crucial observation is that cooking a smaller cut does reduce the cooking time, but not that much. Cheap cuts contain connective tissue, which consists of collagen. Converting the collagen into gelatine takes time. The conversion from collagen to gelantine begins at 70C (160F), so it important the braising keeps this temperature. How long the conversion ...


6

I think you've answered your own question. Browning and adding veggies later will both help. Browning doesn't "seal" the meat to keep flavor or juices in, but it does create a very nice flavor that's almost always associated with meat, caused by the Maillard reaction. I think browning could go a long way to resolving your flavor issue. This is a little ...


6

Dry and even heat. There is still a difference, even with the same cut of meat and using a roasting rack to avoid roasting the cut in its juices: meat on a rotating skewer will be exposed to uniform heat. If you set the temperature of a home oven to 350°F, the top of the roast will be exposed to that temperature, but the bottom, in line of sight to the ...


6

talon8 is absolutely right: the best way to go about this is to use a thermometer. However, it is still an interesting question how the expected cooking time varies with the weight of a roast. It is such an interesting question that in 1961, SIAM Review published a scholarly article entitled "On Cooking a Roast". To be a bit more precise, the question that ...


5

Cooking by time isn't always the most reliable way to judge done-ness. I would just use the times (as is), as a guidline, but insert a thermometer and aim for 135-140 F for medium rare. The thermometer is the best guide. As there are many, many factors that can affect actual cooking time.


4

Though I doubt it would be any more popular than horseradish sauce since it's a strong flavor, it's common to pair blue (bleu) cheese with beef. It can almost be used straight on something like a seared steak, but for a slice of roast I would think you'd want to back off on the heavy cheese flavor. So a creamy sauce with a hint of Roquefort, Stilton or ...


4

When I make a roast and want to make a easy but fancy sauce I use port wine. I take about a cup of wine and a cup of beef stock put it in a large sauce pan and let it reduce way down, until maybe there is half a cup left. I find this tastes great and doesn't over power the beef flavor. I've actually seen people drink what was left after dinner. ...


4

Eye of round is an excellent cut for braising. You can braise it in stock or red wine. An example recipe would be the classic Beef Bourguignon. It's also a perfect candidate for slow-cooking in a crock pot, as well as simply roasted in the oven. If cooking it in the oven, use a thermometer and don't cook it past medium. An overnight marinade can be used ...


4

Your roasting time is going to be as if for a smaller roast. The time that it takes to roast something is based on the time it takes to get the internal temperature to "cooked" depending on how you like it. The bigger the roast, the longer it takes for the internal temperature to reach the correct temperature. It is based on the distance from the outside ...


3

If we're talking about a solid, four pound cut of beef - the only flavor you're ever really going to get is on the exterior and just a little bit into the interior of the meat. That said, cooking in the spices/components you list still may provide liquid gold. I would simply take some of the liquid that's leftover in the slow cooker after the roast has ...


3

I also think rich mushroom sauces go well with beef. I would take a few shallots or mild onion and brown them. Add a pound of sliced portabello or crimini, or white button if you want an economical option. Sautee these until softened, then add a little flour, the pan drippings(skimming most of the fat) and a nice, bold red wine. Reduce until thickened. A ...


3

I, also, like a basic pan sauce or pan gravy. Use the roasting juices and some decent wine - a strong Cabernet or Zinfandel and reduce. I like to finish with some fresh minced herbs, reserving some for garnish. I think thyme, sage, rosemary can all work nicely here, but not too much. For a sauce I would strain this after reducing, then whisk in some very ...


3

More even crust around the whole surface. If you are roasting in a pan, the meat is likely sitting either it's own juices or in some other liquid. Even if you are flipping it over halfway through, the top and bottom are stilling spending half their time wet. Roasting a turning spit, the whole exterior gets exposed to the same amount of dry radiated and ...


2

I would use a riser in your slow cooker. If you raise the meat out of the water above the vegetables, you won't have as much flavor transference in the one direction while still allowing your veg to absorb the juices from the meat. Since the cooking in a slow cooker is achieved by the low moist heat and not boiling, your meat will still come moist and ...


2

Roasting your own beef for sandwiches doesn't have to be time consuming, and you can easily get enough to make sandwichs for quite a while out of one roast. The only problem with slice your own is storage but your freezer will take care of that as long as you take care to make sure the packages you freeze in freeze as quickly as possible to prevent ice ...


2

Black Beer is not beer as you would know it! It is a thick concentrated malt liquor. The best substitute would be a non-alcoholic dark malt liquor, or some malt extract. http://www.drinksdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Mathers_Black_Beer.html


2

You could try tying it up into the original shape, but the trouble is that you've got cut surfaces which have been exposed to bacteria, and which will not reach a high enough temperature to kill them unless you're going to cook it to death, so I wouldn't recommend this. It seems you've actually got sirloin steaks, so why not just cook them as such?


2

You are not giving very much information to provide a quality answer. From a safety point of view, yes, you can absolutely cook them like steaks. From a quality and palatability point of view, that may not be ideal, depending on where the roast from which the steak were cut came from on the animal. The question is, are they better suited to rapid, high ...


2

It's probably less to do with the amount of juices that came out of the rib roast and more to do with the extended caramelisation of those juices produced by overcooking. Those burnt, caramelised bits left in the bottom of the pan are full of flavour and it's probably that, that added so much more flavour to your gravy than you're used to. Just replicate it ...


1

Have you ever heard of "rice and gravy"? It's ubiquitous in Cajun country. That's essentially what you made. To repeat it, all you have to do it brown your meat really well and then deglaze the pan repeatedly throughout the cooking process. It should be a covered braise and you can make it with anything from a roast to meatloaf. You can do it with most ...


1

Eye of round can be difficult to cook. A roast tends to produce the best results, but it can be cooked in steak form as well. There are a couple of directions you can go. First is to cook it as a steak, but do not take it past Medium Rare. Marinate before cooking. Slice it thinly after cooking, across the grain. Serve with sauce. Think London Broil. If ...


1

Sirloin is a better steak than a roast, but if that is what you want... Sear the cut surfaces in a hot pan, and then quickly assemble it into a roast block and twine/skewer it together. Don't go crazy, it is never going to be perfect Roast as normal, baste a little more often than normal, and maybe trim a few minutes off the time Now the fun with this is ...


1

Try some variety of Malta beverage. Malta is a hopped, malt soda/pop. Essentially it's unfermented and carbonated beer. Especially if black beer is exceptionally malty and sweet, Malta would be a good non-alcoholic substitute. If your recipe has some sweet aspect elsewhere you might cut back on that if Malta is too sweet.



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