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4

If it's too tough, keep cooking it. Some people use "tender" to describe a pot roast that is tender like a good steak, others want it to fall apart with no knife required. I regularly cook pot roast 8-12 hours. As log as you have it covered for most of the time (like in a crock pot or in the over covered with foil), it will keep getting more tender until it ...


4

You cannot get rid of the lime flavor, it's there to stay. Your best course of action is to try and balance the strong lime flavor with sweet and savory flavors, for instance shredding the roast onto a bed of chicory/endive leaves with a soy-honey dressing.


3

It is safe to eat, but not safe to serve. Elaboration: Depending on your general cleanliness, there shouldn't be enormous amount of bacteria in the roasts: anything above 100°C (200°F) for an hour is sterilised and if you keep your pans and oven clean (with pyrolysing ovens: easy to do nowadays) it is perfectly safe for you, the dogs, the cat, and any other ...


1

You don't want to leave it in the danger zone (40-140F) for longer than a couple hours. It sounds like you'd be cutting it pretty close, especially given that it spent some time in the danger zone before it went in the oven, and will spend some time closer to room temperature once it's done. So the safe options are things like: Reduce the oven temperature ...


1

You could easily spice the roast well and go for a lemon and herb flavour. The lightness of the citrus could work well with the heavy flavour of the spices.


1

Without a thermometer (which I personally do not own), the other way of testing pork to make sure it is sufficiently cooked is to pierce it with a fork or skewer in the thickest part. Check this extract from recipetips.com: Piercing: Another method for testing doneness is to prick the cut of pork with a fork or the tip of a knife and check to see if the ...


1

it's safe, and if it's dry (probably is) I'd try making BBQ out of it - pull it apart with forks or fingers, as pulled BBQ meat is always better, then simmer on very low in a lot of BBQ sauce. You can freeze portions of the meat for later, just add sauce and simmer when you want it.


1

I have only a partial answer that you may find interesting anyway. In case of your beef recipes you might be able to use the chemical composition of the muscle fibers and they way they react to heating and cooling to your advantage. When you heat beef, the muscle fibers contract, pushing out some of the moisture. A phenomenon every cook will have ...


1

I roasted a 6 kg leg of boned, rolled pork on low heat for 12 hours (overnight) with the skin on (rubbed with crushed marjoram, fennel seeds, caraway seeds and a smidge of salt). When I removed the pork from the oven, I took the skin off and spread it on a baking tray (I wrapped the pork roast in foil and set it aside). I turned the oven up as high as it ...


1

Two pounds is a VERY small roast--I'd recommend at LEAST a 3-pound roast. Brown the meat on top of the stove to sear the outside, which helps keep the juices inside. When braising meat on top of the stove or in the oven, only cover the meat by 1/2 to 1 inch with liquid. After browning the meat, add the liquid and let it come to a boil before putting it in a ...



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