Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

I have no doubt in my mind that this is a serious case of "lost in translation". Where it states to place in the freezer for 24 hours I genuinely believe it means the fridge. Never have I heard of freezing meat as a preparation method for cooking joints. Especially if the intended cooking time is only 2 1/2 hours, it'll still be raw in the middle.


3

It is safe to eat, but not safe to serve. Elaboration: Depending on your general cleanliness, there shouldn't be enormous amount of bacteria in the roasts: anything above 100°C (200°F) for an hour is sterilised and if you keep your pans and oven clean (with pyrolysing ovens: easy to do nowadays) it is perfectly safe for you, the dogs, the cat, and any other ...


3

Leave it uncut, if you slice it now your slices will dry out more.


2

Slow cooking and great crackling do not go hand in hand. Your best bet will be to remove the skin, score and salt it well, and grill/broil it separately. For the leg itself, low and slow is the way to go. How long depends on how long you've got, but 5 or 6 hours in a low oven will do the trick. Start off with the oven on as high as it will go, throw some ...


2

When you buy the sliced meat, take out what you'll use in two days and freeze the rest. If you put wax paper in between portions that you would eat in one serving, or use separate baggies, you only need to pull out what you need. The package might recommend against freezing (for best quality, not safety), but a week or two in the freezer will cause no harm ...


2

It won't make a huge difference, and excellent chefs disagree on the subject (assuming you're only thinking of leaving the meat out for an hour or so, which actually wouldn't bring it to room temp, just slightly warmer than fridge temp). If you are serving people who prefer different levels of doneness, you can take the cold roast from the fridge and put it ...


2

You could put a BBQ grill over one of the hobs (raised up if possible), then cook it over the "open fire". Frequent rotation and quite a bit of time may be needed to cook it suitably. I have a fire pit and a grill when cooking outside over it - normally with God children round.


2

The meat will slice better if chilled first. Just put it in the fridge and slice when you want. I often find myself looking for a better way as I always like it better when fresh cooked and still warm, but that has always been an obstacle as you only eat a certain amount. Then the rest is left. Ticket is that meat will always slice easier when cold.


2

TL;DR: Never use cooking time as a measure for meat doneness. Why? Well it's pretty simple. According to the CDC: What is trichinellosis? Trichinellosis, also called trichinosis, is caused by eating raw or undercooked meat of animals infected with the larvae of a species of worm called Trichinella. Infection occurs commonly in certain wild ...


2

If you cut the nine pound roast into three equal three-pound sections, each should heat to recipe specs.


2

See my relevant answer to a related question. In short, I would recommend avoiding roasting a duck whole—regardless of your skill level, and especially if you are a beginner. The only two advantages you get from roasting the bird whole are the theatrics of tableside presentation and also ease of preparation (i.e., you don't have to worry about butchering ...


1

Without a thermometer (which I personally do not own), the other way of testing pork to make sure it is sufficiently cooked is to pierce it with a fork or skewer in the thickest part. Check this extract from recipetips.com: Piercing: Another method for testing doneness is to prick the cut of pork with a fork or the tip of a knife and check to see if the ...


1

it's safe, and if it's dry (probably is) I'd try making BBQ out of it - pull it apart with forks or fingers, as pulled BBQ meat is always better, then simmer on very low in a lot of BBQ sauce. You can freeze portions of the meat for later, just add sauce and simmer when you want it.


1

I have only a partial answer that you may find interesting anyway. In case of your beef recipes you might be able to use the chemical composition of the muscle fibers and they way they react to heating and cooling to your advantage. When you heat beef, the muscle fibers contract, pushing out some of the moisture. A phenomenon every cook will have ...


1

Throw out. Raw meat should not be kept at room temperature for more than 2 hours.


1

I think you are confusing a lot of things here. First, you apply a cooking technique to the food. Second, the cooking technique causes a lot of physical processes to happen within the food. Third, the cooked food causes sensory perceptions in your head. I once explained the difference between cooking techniques and physical processes in this answer, so won't ...


1

I don't think there is a word specific to the "sweetness of cooling roast pork" in the English language. This is simply an "aroma", and more specifically, the "aroma of roasted pork". (Or, in my house, "the smell of porky goodness") It is produced by caramelization of the sugars and the Maillard reaction that occurs during roasting. These are the same ...


1

What I learnt from my neighbor: The most critical part also the most enjoyable part for the diners is to make the skin crispy. For this many factors should be taken into consideration (e.g. the type of oven you use, room temperature where the oven is, etc). But the trick for the skin to be crispy is how much the skin can become detached from the meat while ...


1

I consider myself a beginner, and I would not be comfortable trying to cook a duck. When done right, duck is one of the most wonderful foods. When done wrong, it is horrible. I consider duck a challenging meat because it is best served rare. However, you really should have the skin crispy. That takes some very precise timing to have the muscle rare but ...


1

Lamb meat is tougher and more fatty than your typical beef roast. 2 cups of red wine is a lot of acidic liquid and that can eat away at the meat as to tenderize it. Your mother may be right, some beef stock to thin out the alcohol may in fact do the trick. Also, rotating the roast would be a good idea as well since a beef roast will dry out at the top ...


1

It may be fine if you eat the ham after two days but there might be a slightly higher risk to get food poisoning. There is a question/answer here in Seasoned Advice which deals with shelf lives of food in general and luncheon meat in particular, too. It says that the meat is fine after a week.


1

Pork loin can be roasted without liquid, or braised with liquid, it's your choice depending on the end result you want. The main concern if roasting dry would be to not overcook the meat as it will dry out, so if you want to do that make sure you use an oven thermometer and don't cook it above 170F at the absolute maximum. When roasting I cook to 155F and ...


1

One of the best things to ever happen was when the USDA finally lowered its recommended internal temp for pork chops and roasts to to a minimum of 145F. YAY! That's medium rare! So it's really unnecessary to do a low, slow and moist method for a lean cut like the sirloin. Save your crock-pot for cuts like the shoulder, which will benefit much more from long, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible