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6

Once the potatoes are overcooked, there is little you can do to give them structure again. Your best bet would be to re-purpose the dish, making them into potato pancakes, a home fry, or some other type of dish, depending on how much structure is left. In the future, you can minimize the chances of mushy breakdown by: Use a waxy potato (such as the US ...


6

It sounds like you are trying to maximize the amount of pan juices, sometimes referred to be the French word jus. Any piece of meat is only going to express so much jus; if you have potatoes or other absorbent vegetables in the roasting pan, they are going to absorb it and it won't be available for another purpose such as gravy. What you still will almost ...


5

There is no simple, single answer to this question. It is a myth to think that you can plug the weight of a roast into a formula and get a time and temperature. You can roast at any temperature you prefer, from about 250 F to 450 F. The lower the temperature, the longer it will take to roast and the more even the doneness will be from center to edge; ...


4

Yes. What you can do is throw the potatoes in with the meat - anything above 85C will eventually cook the potatoes through. Then when you pull the meat out to rest, raise the oven temperature to say 190 - 200 C and possibly add a little fat. They won't take long to finish roasting to a nice golden brown.


2

Lemon, herbs, onions, and garlic too are all aromatics that infuse into the chicken as it cooks giving it a lovely flavor. It doesn't absorb the flavors enough to call it a lemon chicken, but gives the chicken some flavor depth and acts as an enhancement. Stuffing the chicken helps these flavors to infuse better into the meat than spreading them around. Salt ...


2

The USDA FSIS puts out Time-Temperature Tables for Cooking Ready-To-Eat Poultry Products (PDF). They recommend holding the fattest parts of a chicken at 140°F/60°C for 35 minutes to ensure safety. The time is increased greatly as you lower the temperature only a little (for example, it becomes 53 minutes 138°F, a mere 2°F lower). If you raise the ...


2

Slow cooking and great crackling do not go hand in hand. Your best bet will be to remove the skin, score and salt it well, and grill/broil it separately. For the leg itself, low and slow is the way to go. How long depends on how long you've got, but 5 or 6 hours in a low oven will do the trick. Start off with the oven on as high as it will go, throw some ...


1

I can't comment on how long it takes but I can comment on the difference I've noticed between each method. To start out I could never explain the how and why better than J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, over at The Food Lab, so here is what he has to say about high vs low temp roasting: ...


1

Preparation is key, as with most meals. The difference (in tenderness) between a pork sirloin and a pork tenderloin is relatively minor but the tenderloin is generally more tender (as the name implies). In this diagram you can see that they are adjoining cuts from the same primal cut (the Loin). Once you start preparing these cuts the final dish may result ...


1

Wrap it in foil, loosely, and roast in your oven at 250°F (121°C) until an internal temperature of 185°F (85°C), this should be about 1 1/2 hours per pound (but CHECK the internal temp with an instant read thermometer). Note: an internal temp of 160°F (71°C) is "done" but for a tender slow cook brisket you want to let it go to 185°F (85°C)


1

It doesn't matter if it is covered or not. The inside of the slow cooker will be warm enough to cook the meat. Braising (not submerged) and simmering (submerged) are two methods which both can lead to good results. The "very chewy" result sounds like choosing the wrong type of meat for slow cooking. If it was a real roast, then this is the obvious problem. ...


1

I would dice it and make something else out of it -- roast beef hash comes to mind. The potatoes, onion, and whatever else you decide to toss in will overcome the dryness, and chopping it will overcome the toughness.


1

There is no single answer to this question. Even saying you want to bring it to a temperature of 190 (I infer F) is overly simplified, as the conversion of collagen to gelatin is dependent on both time and temperature. It goes faster at higher temperatures, but still takes time. There is no single magic temperature that when you hit it, the conversion is ...



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