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18

If it calls for tightly wrapping it, they're trying for steam. More than likely, they're just trying to shield the top from radiant energy, so the top doesn't brown before the whole thing is cooked through. If you're ever baking a cake, and it's starting to brown, but a toothpick is still coming out wet, I'll move it to a lower rack, and put a sheet pan on ...


18

Meat is tough for two reasons: 1- An abundance of connective tissue. 2- When over cooked. In your case I'd say you probably have both problems. Cheap meat is tough meat. It is from older animals or well worked muscle groups. This means that it has been fortified with a lot of extra connective tissue. It also means it has a lot of flavor. The solution to ...


16

I suggest using a brine. Lots of brining details can be found in the answers to this question: What are the basics of brining meat? Alton Brown has a really great recipe for brined roasted turkey. You can watch the Good Eats excerpt on YouTube in which he covers brining turkey. I also suggest reading The Basics of Brining (PDF) from Cook's ...


16

The reason that roasted garlic tastes so much milder than raw garlic is that it contains a sulfur compound called allicin, which roasting breaks down. Allicin is primarily what gives garlic its pungency. Technically, raw garlic mostly contains a compound called allin, which reacts with the allinase enzyme to produce the allicin, and this reaction is ...


15

I agree with Jay's answer that one of the reasons is because of keeping the skin crispy, but I don't agree about the difference with other types of poultry and have a bit more background info. The root difference between duck and other poultry is that duck is much fattier, and most of that fat is stored under the skin. If you don't do anything about the ...


14

Hot Air Popper The cheapest and simplest is to use a (cheap) electric hot air popper. The old favorite is the West Bend Poppery, but you can use anything as long as the vent holes (where the hot air comes in) are on the sides rather than the bottom. I've roasted a lot of coffee this way. It works, but there are a few downsides. The biggest problems: The ...


14

Roasting the bones will give you a darker brown stock than using the raw bones. To roast the bones, just stick them in an oven on high heat, around 450 for about 45 minutes, or until they are a nice golden caramelized color. Though you will want to make sure to keep an eye on them the first time, I'd check every 5 minutes after half an hour. Roasting the ...


13

You could use a drill and soup can. http://lifehacker.com/5494207/roast-coffee-with-a-drill-and-a-soup-can Other life hacker tips for roasting coffee at home on the cheap http://lifehacker.com/226925/diy-coffee-roasting http://lifehacker.com/365235/roll-your-own-coffee-roaster-on+the+cheap


12

I believe that the following study provides a definitive answer: Application of high performance liquid chromatography to the analysis of some non-volatile coffee components From the abstract: High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was applied to the analysis of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose in Arabica and Robusta coffee. ...


11

In Spain, the traditional way is using something like this: Or a pan with holes. The big day to do it is called Magosto and it's celebrated on 11/11, but it varies from town to town. It's one of the closest things to a barbecue, you first roast chorizos, then you roast chestnuts. If you don't have access to those tools, your best option is to put them ...


11

I think it's more about technique than what fat you use when you're looking for crispy outsides (I'm sure there is at least one question here already that has the technique answers). About the only solid advice I would give is that you need to find a fat that tastes good to you, or is neutral if that's your preference, and make sure the one you use won't ...


10

I just use in any pan. Put in a single layer of beans (don't overcrowd them) and heat it to medium heat. Keep shaking the pan from time to time, so the beans turn and will be roasted from all sides. After a few (3 or 4) minutes you will hear the beans starting to "crack". At this point, they will be lightly roasted. You could stop now or keep going, if you ...


10

Rice flour should work well for this; it produces very crispy crusts.


10

Bone marrow is made up of a large portion of fat. If you roast it low and slow, you render out a good portion of that fat and are left with a liquidy mess. Also the high heat will start to carmelize the bone marrow, providing much flavor.


10

You can cut the apple cider with some apple cider vinegar. Adding a couple tablespoons of cider vinegar to 1 cup of apple cider should do the trick. You can also add a bit of mustard seed, whole or ground to give it some heat that can help combat the sweetness. I wouldn't add more than a pinch of ground mustard or a half tsp of whole seeds. I use this ...


9

If you have a gas range, just fire up a burner. Make sure to have some tongs ready if you can't rest the pepper at a good height above the flame. (You'll probably want them to turn the pepper anyways.) Once sufficiently blackened (and not on fire mind you) toss in a paper bag and close it. Let it rest and the residual heat inside the pepper will continue to ...


9

There's really no such thing as 'sealing in juices' when it comes to meat. Skin-on chicken breast stays relatively moist because of the fat in the skin; because the skin is on top, it pretty much self-bastes. Broiling just crisps the skin afterwards and will do nothing moisture-wise. With pork chops, however, the fat is around the side and so will drip off ...


8

I like nuts that are finely chopped, kinda like bread crumbs. Almond flour will perhaps work as well.


8

It sounds like you accomplished something like braising in your oven. Low moist heat for an hour will definitely make meat fall off the bone for something as delicate as a chicken. The skin was crisped up by the broiler, of course. You could probably accomplish something similar by crisping up the skin in a pan or under a broiler, then putting the chicken ...


8

I suspect you may have created a poor-man's slow-cooking environment in there. You had meat, and liquid, and a median temperature of around 200° F, and you probably also got the bird close to "done" during the first broil, before you even left the house. This is obviously easier to do when the meat is covered (was it in a covered roasting pan?) due to the ...


8

Roasting them under the broiler creates a nice even color and flavor.


8

What would "ideal" mean? Most items that you can roast in 2-3 hours can also be thrown in the slow cooker for 10-12 hours. It depends entirely on how the dish is prepared, how much fat/water you're using, whether or not you incorporate steam or convection, and more. Anyway, if there were such an algorithm, it would be highly inadvisable to try using it at ...


8

While I heartily recommend a remote probe thermometer that you can leave in your meat and have a readout outside of the oven, it is only for convenience. Piercing the meat with a thermometer (or fork, etc) isn't going to cause any significant loss of juice. You may rupture a couple of cells right where the thermometer went in, but that's it. Your meat isn't ...


7

I've spatchcocked our turkey the past two years and will never go back to the usual way. It just cooks so much faster. The spatchcocking itself isn't to hard, although you do have to be willing to inflict a little violence on the turkey. I basically follow Mark Bittman's recipe. The video is located here. I do, however cook a larger bird. The time I did it ...


7

You fry them in a saucepan with some oil (I use either olive or sunflower). In order they don't explode an become pop-corn, you should have kept them in water for several (6~48) hours before frying them. If you want them softer (and bigger), put them in water at 70°C for about 20~30 minutes. How do you know they are done? When they are golden in the ...


7

If you're following a particular recipe to the letter, and it specifies tying the legs together, then you might want to consider it. Otherwise, I wouldn't bother. Trussing a bird will pull it together into a more compact shape, the reasoning for cooking being that it will cook more evenly if it's closer to a uniform spheroid shape, rather than having leg ...


7

For the US crowd, silverside is the part of the round closest to sirloin, so it's a working cut and fairly lean. In order to keep this juicy you'll need to bard it, in other words add fat. I'd do this by wrapping the whole thing up in streaky (US style) bacon and then sear it at high temperature to give it that crust before turning it down and continue the ...


7

There's a lot of range of acceptable outcomes for this, so let me give you the parameters I work with. I generally start by mixing the cauliflower with some oil (olive oil typically; others substituted depending on the flavor profile I want) on a baking sheet, then sprinkling with salt. This part is important; if you skip the oil, you'll likely just end up ...


6

There are terrific Thai pumpkin curries; the flavor profile would be garlic, ginger, lemongrass, coriander seed, cilantro, chiles, Thai basil. Here is one I did with Delicata squash that would work equally well with pumpkin: http://www.herbivoracious.com/2009/10/red-curry-delicata-squash-and-tofu-recipe.html .



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