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29

It's actually spelled 'roux', and is a mixture of oil and flour, cooked to remove the starchy taste of the flour. It's a great thickener any time that you don't need the sauce to be clear, and you have time to cook it down. I typically use it for cream sauce (including cheese sauces, such as for mac & cheese) and gravies. As for benefits -- it's habit ...


20

Could be an unfinished roux (the butter, flour mixture). But most likely it's because the cheese was heated too quickly or too much, causing the protein to clump up. Suggestions: Melt with less heat Use a double boiler (to reduce hot spots within the pan) Toss the shredded cheddar with cornstarch first (starch helps reduce clumping) Add cheese in smaller ...


12

Gravy is supposed to be opaque and is a result of using flour as the thickener. If you want clear gravy, like what you would get in a Chinese restaurant, then you need to use corn starch or arrowroot as your thickener. But the opacity is considered to be a good thing. It's the canned stuff you buy in the store that is clear.


11

If your sauce is too thin, the problem is that your initial roux was either too thin (not enough flour) or you added too much liquid for the amount of roux that you made. Standard ratios are 1 Tbsp butter - 1 Tbsp flour - 1 cup liquid for a thin sauce, 2-2-1 for something in the middle and 3-3-1 for a thick sauce. Once you've made the sauce and it's too ...


10

The purpose of using a roux, as opposed to just plain flour, is to improve the dispersal of starch molecules in the sauce. If you just toss a bunch of flour into a simmering sauce - or do the reverse, pour hot liquid onto dry flour - then you'll immediately start getting gross glutinous lumps and will find it nearly impossible to smooth them out. Starch is ...


10

Cook it longer, and watch your proportions. If it's too dry (not enough fat), it's hard to cook through without burning it. You want to get to a golden brown color throughout. You can cook it until it's darker and it'll add more caramel/nutty flavor (don't burn it), but it has to be at least a golden color before it's cooked enough to not taste of raw flour. ...


10

A "Roux" is a mixture of 50% butter, 50% flour that is used as a starch thickener for a number of "mother" sauces (notably Béchamel, Espagnole, Velouté). For a white sauce base, you may heat both butter and flour together in a saucepan over a low flame while combining with a wooden spatula. After just 30 seconds mixing, you will get a consistent ...


9

Making a roux has two purposes: Coat the flour granules with fat so they are able to dissolve into the cooking liquid without binding up. Cook the flour to remove the raw cereal flavor. When the cooked, fat-covered, flour is introduced to boiling liquid the starch granules swell and explode tangling up the cooking liquid. The cooking liquid is thus ...


8

Roux Method The advantages of the roux method: It can be prepared in advance The raw flour taste is cooked out when the roux is prepared, so the sauce is ready as soon as it is thickened; this also makes it easier to add more roux to adjust the thickness of the sauce. It actually requires less supervision. You are actually being overly fussy with your ...


8

The advantage can be reduced to one word: taste. A slurry based sauce is not the same thing as a roux based sauce. Milk pudding is not a Bechamel in the same way that a baguette is not a brioche, margarine is not butter, and 'cocoa-containing fat glaze' is not ganache. It has a different taste, and cooks over the generations have preferred the Bechamel ...


7

Then I began to slowly add chicken stock. There's your problem: slowly. When you add the stock to the roux, an irreversible chemical reaction starts, where the starches from the roux bind to the fluid and gelatinize. After they have gelatinized, they cannot soak up any more fluid. So when you add a small amount of stock and stir it all in, all the ...


7

You can freeze roux and store it up to 6 months without any problems. I put them in plastic ice-tray forms until they are frozen, then move them to a refrigerator bag. Just keep following things in mind: Leave a bit of room in the container before putting it in the freezer - it expends when freezing. Make it have room temperature before using it


7

My understanding is that the ratio shifts from 10:1 (liquid to roux) for a pale roux, up to about 5:1 for a nutty brown roux, with a somewhat linear relationship between the two extremes. A dark brown roux has very little thickening power, mostly they are used for flavor more than actual work-a-day thickening. The problem may not so much in the roux ratios, ...


6

as mentioned by others a 'roux' is flour and oil/butter mixed together, while under heat. a roux is normally used for thickening sauces (usually cream/cheese type sauces). the benefits of using a roux, are that your sauces will not get lumpy. Try just adding flour directly to the sauce next time. All you will get are lumps of flour in it. Not nice! the ...


6

I have two suspicions: One, you're undercooking your roux, the flour and butter mixture, and not fully incorporating the flour. Two, you're adding too much cheese too quickly and it isn't melting smoothly. Solutions: cook the roux until light golden brown, finely grate the cheese and add it slowly, stirring constantly.


6

There's a great overview of the differences here, including a taste-test experiment at the end. Broadly: beurre manié started off as a "lazy" roux; some people claim that the cooking of the roux reduces any "floury" taste; the experiment did not find any discernible difference between the two options for either a bechamel sauce or a velouté.


6

Roux is very forgiving, and can be made a variety of consistencies, or ratios of butter to flour. It should only be brown if you are intentionally making a brown roux, for the flavor. Otherwise, it should be fairly yellow, closer to the color of the butter. At the canonical ratio of 1:1 butter to flour (by volume), the consistency will be thick enough not ...


6

I know it seems that mac 'n cheese should be a simple thing for a beginner cook to make. It isn't. Without a solid recipe, even experienced cooks can royally screw up mac 'n cheese. Generally it starts with a bechamel, also known as a white sauce. You're right, that starts with a roux which requires flour, or at least some kind of starch. Once you've got a ...


5

In my experience it's because of: too much heat too much acidity (for example from a shot of lemon juice) Too much heat causes the protein in the cheese to clump. You can use a mixer to dissolve the clumps (mix at the highest speed). Too much acidity also does the same. The more sour a sauce gets the faster it clumps when heating. Lemon juice gives a ...


5

There is no problem at all doing this. At a restaurant where I worked, we would make up a couple pounds of butter worth of roux at a time. The main thing you want to do is use a pan with a lot of surface area, so it cooks evenly. A whisk will work fine. You don't have to stir constantly, just frequently.


5

Typical procedure: Heat shortening (oil or butter), add flour, cook, stirring continually, for a few minutes. Add liquid a little bit at a time. Many sauce recipes (e.g. Mac & Cheese white sauce) are just built up this way; in other cases you'll in turn add the somewhat thinned roux to something else.


5

Gravlaxsås is a mustard sauce for salmon, made with dill. The one I bought reports the following ingredients: mustard vegetable oil sugar water wine vinegar dill modified cornstarch On this site, the ingredients reported for gravlaxsås are the following: 6.5 tbsp. oil 2 tbsp. vinegar 2 tbsp. prepared mustard 1 egg yolk 0.25 tsp. salt 0.25 tsp. dill ...


5

As an alternative to corn flour, Arrowroot is a plant based starch of similar price to corn starch but with some better qualities Important is sauces is that it does not cloud the sauce, and keeps a shiny appearance Also, it doesn't require the heat level to set that corn starch does. So it can be added after a sauce is finished to increase thickness ...


5

Typically, you go for 1 tbsp flour, 1 tbsp butter for each cup of liquid. You may have to adjust slightly, but that's a good starting point. After the quantity of roux, the next factor to thickening strength is cooking time. The longer you cook the roux, and consequently, how dark it gets, the less thick the final result will be for a given quantity of ...


5

According to On Food and Cooking by Harold McGee, roux functions as a thickener due the starches in the flour swelling up and interfering with the flow of water. In fact, he indicates that technique can be used with any starch and any fat. This implies that a lower-protein flour (which implies higher starch, weight per weight) like soft summer wheat, or a ...


4

You should always add your roux when then stock is boiling. Other wise, you may not only end up in your present situation, but you end up having no idea how thick or thin your soup or sauce will be once it boils. Starches (roux, corn starch) thicken like popcorn pops. Once it gets hot enough, it 'blooms' and causes the thickening of the liquid. If you put ...


4

A roux normally is equal parts fat and flour. It should be fairly solid, not runny. However, it is an individual decision. I've known guys who like it quite solid (like me), but you have to whisk the hell out of it to get out all of the lumps. Normally, if I am making a sauce or soup that I can't strain, I will make it a little slack. I also add my roux ...


4

For making gravy I prefer to make dark roux in the oven. Melt 1 part butter in a baking dish, sprinkle with 1 part flour, bake for 30 minutes (stirring and re-spreading half way through). This works great once you have taken the turkey or roast out of the oven to rest. Once you have your roux to the desired color starting adding your drippings and broth ...


4

You can get roux in a jar You can also make roux in the microwave You can even make a dry roux without any oil! The most difficult part of making a roux on top of the stove is that you could burn it and have to start all over again.


4

A roux is a stable mixture (an emulsion) of fat and water held together by an emulsifier such as starch. So you could try any number of flours from grains that contain starch such as potato, rice, barley, buckwheat, etc. As far as the Maillard Reaction taste and color that you'd like to substitude, potato and barley (IMO) are the better bets. The note on ...



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