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34

Probably generated some chloramines by reaction between the hot bleach and proteins on the stove surfaces. There's no telling exactly which chloramines you created, as we have no idea what amines were on your stove top. However, these things can be quite nasty. Open windows if possible, and leave home for several hours. Your eyes and lungs are giving you ...


8

Bleach contains sodium hypochlorite. The fumes being released are almost certainly chlorine, which as you have observed, is quite hazardous. Bleach usually contains strong warnings not to mix with any other cleaning chemical, as some of them will tend to rapidly decompose its active ingredient and release a lot of gaseous chlorine. I expect applying heat has ...


8

Looking at it from a materials-science standpoint rather than a physics standpoint, I agree that plastic is safer than glass. The difference is in how they break. Glass is stronger than plastic, for any plastic that a blender jar is likely to be made out of, and is less likely to break from, for example, trying to blend a spoon you forgot to remove. ...


7

Botulism is spot on - not only can botulism spores survive in honey (hence the "no honey for babies under 1 year" rule), the truffles have grown in soil, which is a typical source of Clostridium botulinum spores. There are well- known reports of botulism caused by garlic in oil and truffles in oil (albeit rarer due to the way smaller total amount of ...


6

TL;DR: Plastic is better than Glass. It won't break (don't sue me if it does). If it does, you have about 0.0000518 seconds to get out of the way. A blender I picked at random. It has a powerful 750W motor. A different blender that I saw with 35,000 rpm had a 1725W motor. This divides down to be ≈ 15,200 RPM. The size: 40H x 18W x 18D So the main box ...


5

The answer from the 'Product Manager - Cookware' of Zwilling, translated to English: [Snipped introduction] Different factors influence the design of the handle during the product creation process. At the first step there are optical reasons. This is the phase of the first design drawings. As soon as we decide internally on a draft, we craft ...


4

Did some looking and while I haven't found an authoritative answer, in the introduction to this design paper, he describes a theory that I think makes a lot of sense. Traditionally, pots and pans have always had a long straight handle, since they were designed to be used in an open fire. With the advent of modern stovetops, pots and pans were lifted ...


3

The simple answer is that propane cylinders should be stored outside. That's what every guide will tell you. You really shouldn't even be storing it in a garage. Your yard is the best place, and if you take the safety guidelines seriously, you probably shouldn't own a propane torch if you don't have an "outside" (i.e. you live in an apartment). Either that ...


3

I've left comments everywhere on this thread because food safety deserves a lot of visibility. Summary here: While this may not be standard terminology, these egg safety guidelines from the NSW government distinguish between broken and cracked eggs. (It also says that both are unsafe.) A broken egg has neither shell nor membrane intact A cracked egg has ...


3

Is it safe? That depends on a lot of factors. Generally, no. It isn't. A blog post from the Healthy Home Economist has the opinion of a firefighter: One gal mentioned that her husband was a firefighter and that leaving a stockpot simmering overnight or while they were out of the house was completely out of the question. Source. The NFPA says ...


2

In addition to @Rumtscho's answer: chicken breast is often injected with water to increase profit, especially when you buy it in discount stores. When you heat it, that water turns to steam, and if it leaks first into the hot oil or butter you get serious splatter. It's bad enough some people call it "exploding chicken", and radical vegan organisations use ...


2

The reason why fried meat splatters is that correct frying temperatures (~ 180 Celsius pan surface) are well above the vaporizing temperature of water (100 Celsius). Each droplet of cell plasma which comes into contact with the frying fat creates a tiny steam explosion. And explosions splatter. If you were meaning to ask not why it splatters, but how to ...


2

Not only is it okay to do so, I frequently place waffles directly on oven racks after making them fresh to keep warm or to cool before freezing (without ruining the crisp crust, as happens when you put them on a plate or stack them). There's no reason you can't heat items you'd normally put in a toaster (or toaster oven) in a normal oven. The only possible ...


2

So that the handle hangs straight down if it's used to hang the saucepan from a rack, which is more aesthetically pleasing than having it hang at an angle, which a straight handle would do. For example:


2

The reason some products are marked "Top Rack Only", is because many dishwashers have the heating element situated at the bottom of the interior, in close proximity to the bottom rack. It looks and acts much like the heating element in an electric oven. Typically, this heater comes on during the final rinse cycle, to boost the water temperature. It also ...


2

To make the house smell like lemons, a better way might be to bake leftover lemon rinds (whole lemons work too, but the rind is really all you need) on a foil-covered baking sheet. I occasionally do this with oranges and cinnamon sticks. Bake them at around 250 or 275 degrees (F). Bake them until they turn dark brown and start to smell toasted.


1

Yes, that's safe. I don't know if it'll really make the house smell that strongly, but yes, you can safely boil (or otherwise cook) any food you want, especially if you're not even going to drink or eat it. (Yes, there are exceptions like oil and alcohol, but anything you'd actually eat or drink in large quantities is fine.) Food safety issues are generally ...


1

They're not going to brown in the freezer. All you have to do is make sure they're not browned before you put them in, and that you cook them reasonably promptly when you take them out. So if you're shredding a lot, hold them in water til you're ready to cook them. After cooking, rinse to cool them, drain them well and pat them dry before freezing.


1

It does seem dangerous to me. You don't know where they have been before you bought them, so bacteria and other stuff can contaminate the eggs with their shell broken. You can safely eat the eggs that didn't break. Their shell and membrane protects them. The broken ones should be thrown away if you want to be sure you are safe. This reference puts it this ...


1

While nobody can say with 100% certainty that your refrozen sherbet is safe, I certainly would not expect any danger. The ingredients in sherbet are just not that conducive to quick or dangerous spoilage. The problem I would anticipate would have much more to do with quality. Sherbet is frozen while being churned, giving it a consistency like ice cream. ...


1

A little trick my mother taught me - add a pinch of all purpose white flour to the oil before adding in whatever you're frying. It won't totally eliminate the amount of splatter, it will greatly reduce it, although I'm not sure of the science behind it. Beware though, that adding the flour will tend to burn the flour, so do be mindful of temperatures. ...


1

It's okay to do so. There are mini-ovens / toasters where you put pop-tarts/ toast/bread/waffles directly on the (clean) grill. Nick Johnson, source If the heating rods are directly in the base (like in orinary big eletric ovens) make sure that no crumbs are on the base. This can cause nasty burnt crumbs. Or at least remove the crumbs after you heated up ...


1

Most recommendations about storing propane tanks outside are assuming you're storing quite a large amount of it (eg, 20lb tanks for a grill). Odds are a hand-torch has a 1-lb tank or smaller, which isn't quite as much of a problem, as be less likely to reach the concentrations to be explosive. (that's not to say it wouldn't be flamible ... just not ...


1

Most aerosol cans contain a reasonable propane or some other cheap hydrocarbon gas as the propellant. Many household have a cupboard full of them The build quality of a disposable aerosol can is much lower than a propane cylinder, and they regularly leak, but how many household explosions/fires have been reported to be caused by them, basically none Most ...



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