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6

The key issue is getting the contents of each jar up to the requisite temperature for the necessary time, all the way through to the center of the jars. It would be conceivably possible to use steaming to do so, if the requisite controlled temperatures and times could be regulated, and appropriate recipes developed. However, according to the USDA as ...


6

Yes, a simmer will be on the order of 180 to 200 F (82 - 93 C) which is a safe temperature for cooking and holding stew. Browning beef does cook it, but usually not all the way through as that is not the point; instead it is to develop the flavors. The full cooking is done during the braising or stewing stage while you simmer it. This also allows the ...


6

These are the USDA recommendations for raw ground beef - it says that after buying it from a store (assuming the store follows the sanitary norms), you can leave it non-refrigerated for up to 2 hours. My guess is that this is where your worry is coming from: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/fact_sheets/Ground_Beef_and_Food_Safety/index.asp#25 On the other hand, ...


5

I agree that fermentation from bacteria is the most likely explanation. So, to tackle your questions point by point: It is unsafe, as the other posts already mentioned, due to botulism danger. Plant matter without access to oxygen is not shelf stable, unless it has been pickled with sufficient acid. There will be some chemistry going on between garlic ...


5

I would throw it away quickly. Making garlic oil is a huge risk for botulism (botulism is a bacteria that thrives in food when there's a lack of oxygen, as is the case with garlic submerged in olive oil). You CAN make garlic-infused olive oil, but it's best to keep it in the fridge to prevent the botulism from growing. They say that it's difficult to tell ...


5

The most important things in cooking first aid kits to me are liquid skin, vitamin C powder, and cortisone cream. Obviously antiseptic and bandages are important too, but I assume those are standard. Liquid skin (basically clear nail polish) is antiseptic and helps to seal up cuts so they stop bleeding faster. It also helps to prevent the effect that any ...


5

Sometimes. Basically, this is the same as asking if glass is oven safe: Generally, glass is oven-safe if taken from room temperature and put in a moderate-temperature, preheated oven. The key thing is to avoid temperature shocks (which will cause the glass to shatter). Some glass is specifically designed for oven use (either by being tempered or made of ...


4

There are indeed different varieties of sorrel,* but they're both/all high (though I can't determine how high) in the substance of concern, which is oxalic acid. This acid is found in lots of other green leafy vegetables, notably spinach and parsley, and is the reason that you shouldn't eat rhubarb leaves.** It seems to have a reasonably high expected ...


4

There's so much heat around a turkey deep-fryer I wouldn't see how light or medium snow would affect your cooking. Any snow is going to melt and probably evaporate before it comes into contact with any hot oil, and any that makes contact will be gone in a flash. I've barbequed in 20 below and in snow, all that it really means is that you need more heat. My ...


4

The only Pyrex that I'm aware of that was labeled as being safe for the cooktop was the 'Pyrex Visions' line, and I don't believe they ever made anything that I'd call a 'baking dish' from it. I know they made skillets, pots, and dutch ovens, and the associated lids. It's typically a sort of orange-brown color, and there were also some pink-ish ones. ...


4

If your chicken goes into the flour, you've got a contamination risk...which can't be sifted out. While the likelihood that you poison yourself and your guests is minimal, particularly if you refrigerate, use in the next day or two, and cook thoroughly (certainly don't cross contaminate by mixing the sifted flour back into your unused flour)....I wouldn't ...


3

First of all: I am not very familiar with fermentation. Therefore I cannot give you any advice as to whether your oil is still edible or not. Could it be capillary action that caused the oil overflow? If I remember rightly PC enthusiasts who submerge a whole PC into an aquarium with cooking oil (for cooling) always have the problem that oil "climbs" the ...


3

As everyone's already pointed out this is a BAD idea... BUT I make too much flour all the time too. What I choose to do instead of throwing out the left over seasoned flour (considering it's touched raw meat) is to add some egg to the flour and mix it thoroughly. I then fry that dough in the pan just like I did the flour and egg covered chicken, beef, ...


3

Equipment isn't really as important as knowing how to use it. Many hiker medics travel with nothing but a half roll of duct tape, gauze, and a couple of salves. Stuff like finger bandages and colored band-aids are really just conveniences more than essentials. In a kitchen you have many of the things you need already without buying anything: running water to ...


3

All cook top safety is the same: Keep it clean and pay attention! Glass ranges aren't inherently any more unsafe than a gas or normal electric range. Ranges are just a tool, one that generates a large amount of heat in a small area. Like any tool, you can hurt yourself or others if you don't follow the basic rules of use. Luckily, those rules are pretty ...


3

Update based on edited question: there are no issues of toxicity. It is a very poor idea to use glass cookware on a burner. Not all Pyrex is made from high quality borosilicate glass anymore, and even if you have some, the issue is thermal shock, not toxicity. If you heat or cool glass very rapidly, the internal stress caused by thermal expansion (or ...


3

Propane grills mix air with gas before burning it. Ash from charcoal and other contaminants can clog the flue and produce inefficient burning of the gas, possibly produce carbon monoxide (poison) or even gas build up. As long as the gas parts (igniter, flue, pipes, etc) are clean and unaffected, the charcoal, hickory stick, etc, should not cause any ...


2

It is a common practice on gas grills to smoke using wood chips in a manner similar that described in the referenced question: placing the wood chips in a foil pouch or pan, and allowing them to sit above the gas flame, smoldering, and thus producing smoke. Note that in the described scenario, the method is the same, except for the fuel: the charcoal is ...


2

The symbols for that glassware do not indicate stove top use. I have owned glassware (Corning Ware Visions) that was specifically build for stove top use, the design, glass color and symbols designation were different. The 300 degree centigrade rating would be on the low side for a gas flame (900 - 1500 deg C). I also have personally had oven-safe ...


2

Keeping the flour seems like a bad idea, as explained in the other answers. The obvious solution is to stop getting carried away and using too much flour! Alternatively, instead of dredging the chicken through the flour, you could try sprinkling the flour on by hand. As long as you're careful to use one hand for the chicken and one for the flour, your ...


2

That is called crazing. It is a crack or fissure in the enamel coating on the cup, not indicative of deep structural flaws. Your cup is unlikely to fail in the sense of completely breaking due to the craze in the glaze. On the other hand, they will stain over time, and be unsightly, and hard to wash out. If the piece is old enough, the glaze may ...


1

The US Fire Administration clearly recommends not leaving cooking appliances unattended when no one is home: Based on 2006-2010 annual averages: Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in home cooking fires. [...] Ranges accounted for the largest share (58%) of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%. ...


1

In terms of the chance of your oven catching fire/exploding, I don't believe that whether you are there or not would not make much difference. The only difference you watching the oven makes is that you can respond if it were to catch fire - saving your house. (I suppose there are some cases where your oven would start smoking, which would make you turn it ...


1

Rapeseed oil (aka canola for those across the pond) has a high burning point, but it can still start on fire using a blowtorch. If you are using just a bit of oil in a non-stick pan then there's not much fuel to burn, however if it flames it will probably go quick and the flames will go pretty high. It's unlikely to start your kitchen on fire, but you could ...


1

Assuming that there were stock pots manufactured with handles that broke off, they would likely have been recalled by the CPSC. It appears that the CPSC has only ever recalled one stock pot that was based on a single report of a handle breaking off. The problematic stock pot was sold by a liquidation company. Based on this, I'd assume that any NSF ...


1

Besides the cuts and burns, the other thing that I've made the mistake of a few too many times are not washing my hands immediately or well enough after cutting up hot peppers. (and if you then cut up onions and you wipe the side of your face when you tear up ... and manage to get it in your eyes). I've done it enough times that I'm surprised that I don't ...


1

I believe the following companies advertise that they produce bakeware made out of borosilicate available in the US, : Luminarc Arcuisine Elegance I can't speak to the boron/boron plus/zero boron debate, but those are the two I would investigate. I know that Bodum also advertises borosilicate products, but I'm not sure if they make bakeware.



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