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34

Probably generated some chloramines by reaction between the hot bleach and proteins on the stove surfaces. There's no telling exactly which chloramines you created, as we have no idea what amines were on your stove top. However, these things can be quite nasty. Open windows if possible, and leave home for several hours. Your eyes and lungs are giving you ...


27

There is almost no food which is guaranteed to be safe. If it has nutritional value for a human, it has nutritional value for many microorganisms too, some of which are human pathogens. So, out of the FATTOM rule, you can already throw out F: you cannot remove the food. A is also not a good candidate - no food is naturally acidic enough, and while there ...


20

NO! It would not. They will break, possibly violently. Unless they are labeled for that use, don't do it.


17

It is not a good idea. You can certainly prepare your seasoned flour mixture and keep it in bulk. Just transfer it as you need it to the container where you do the actual breading or dredging; then you don't need to discard the entire amount.


11

No, this is a very, very bad idea. The thermal gradient can lead to uneven expansion and shattering. This is true of the modern product as well as the historical borosilicate product.


8

Looking at it from a materials-science standpoint rather than a physics standpoint, I agree that plastic is safer than glass. The difference is in how they break. Glass is stronger than plastic, for any plastic that a blender jar is likely to be made out of, and is less likely to break from, for example, trying to blend a spoon you forgot to remove. ...


8

Bleach contains sodium hypochlorite. The fumes being released are almost certainly chlorine, which as you have observed, is quite hazardous. Bleach usually contains strong warnings not to mix with any other cleaning chemical, as some of them will tend to rapidly decompose its active ingredient and release a lot of gaseous chlorine. I expect applying heat has ...


6

These are the USDA recommendations for raw ground beef - it says that after buying it from a store (assuming the store follows the sanitary norms), you can leave it non-refrigerated for up to 2 hours. My guess is that this is where your worry is coming from: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/fact_sheets/Ground_Beef_and_Food_Safety/index.asp#25 On the other hand, ...


6

The key issue is getting the contents of each jar up to the requisite temperature for the necessary time, all the way through to the center of the jars. It would be conceivably possible to use steaming to do so, if the requisite controlled temperatures and times could be regulated, and appropriate recipes developed. However, according to the USDA as ...


6

TL;DR: Plastic is better than Glass. It won't break (don't sue me if it does). If it does, you have about 0.0000518 seconds to get out of the way. A blender I picked at random. It has a powerful 750W motor. A different blender that I saw with 35,000 rpm had a 1725W motor. This divides down to be ≈ 15,200 RPM. The size: 40H x 18W x 18D So the main box ...


6

Picture: Spiritus is a Polish vodka that is 98% alcohol by volume. I should think it is as sterile as it is possible to get. Foods that are very high concentration chemicals are typically poor habitats for bacteria and moulds. Items which are high sugar, high salt, or high alcohol would typically be safe. You probably have pure sugar and salt in the house ...


6

No, it is not safe; what you would have left in the pot would have the <2-4 hours worth of safety at room temperature as anything else. What you would have in the pot after steaming corn is sweetened corn broth; it will mold and it will grow bacteria. You would probably be fine 9999 times out of 10,000, but considering the expense of starting fresh every ...


5

The most important things in cooking first aid kits to me are liquid skin, vitamin C powder, and cortisone cream. Obviously antiseptic and bandages are important too, but I assume those are standard. Liquid skin (basically clear nail polish) is antiseptic and helps to seal up cuts so they stop bleeding faster. It also helps to prevent the effect that any ...


5

Yes, a simmer will be on the order of 180 to 200 F (82 - 93 C) which is a safe temperature for cooking and holding stew. Browning beef does cook it, but usually not all the way through as that is not the point; instead it is to develop the flavors. The full cooking is done during the braising or stewing stage while you simmer it. This also allows the ...


5

Sometimes. Basically, this is the same as asking if glass is oven safe: Generally, glass is oven-safe if taken from room temperature and put in a moderate-temperature, preheated oven. The key thing is to avoid temperature shocks (which will cause the glass to shatter). Some glass is specifically designed for oven use (either by being tempered or made of ...


5

I agree that fermentation from bacteria is the most likely explanation. So, to tackle your questions point by point: It is unsafe, as the other posts already mentioned, due to botulism danger. Plant matter without access to oxygen is not shelf stable, unless it has been pickled with sufficient acid. There will be some chemistry going on between garlic ...


5

I would throw it away quickly. Making garlic oil is a huge risk for botulism (botulism is a bacteria that thrives in food when there's a lack of oxygen, as is the case with garlic submerged in olive oil). You CAN make garlic-infused olive oil, but it's best to keep it in the fridge to prevent the botulism from growing. They say that it's difficult to tell ...


5

Polyethylene, which is the material typically used for sous vide bags, is stable at the temperatures the sous vide bath will reach. Ensuring you're using the right kind of bag, and checking that the temperature hasn't gone too high, should avoid any risk of melting. Polyethelene is much more stable than plasticized plastics. It's fine at the low ...


4

If your chicken goes into the flour, you've got a contamination risk...which can't be sifted out. While the likelihood that you poison yourself and your guests is minimal, particularly if you refrigerate, use in the next day or two, and cook thoroughly (certainly don't cross contaminate by mixing the sifted flour back into your unused flour)....I wouldn't ...


4

First of all: I am not very familiar with fermentation. Therefore I cannot give you any advice as to whether your oil is still edible or not. Could it be capillary action that caused the oil overflow? If I remember rightly PC enthusiasts who submerge a whole PC into an aquarium with cooking oil (for cooling) always have the problem that oil "climbs" the ...


4

There are indeed different varieties of sorrel,* but they're both/all high (though I can't determine how high) in the substance of concern, which is oxalic acid. This acid is found in lots of other green leafy vegetables, notably spinach and parsley, and is the reason that you shouldn't eat rhubarb leaves.** It seems to have a reasonably high expected ...


4

The only Pyrex that I'm aware of that was labeled as being safe for the cooktop was the 'Pyrex Visions' line, and I don't believe they ever made anything that I'd call a 'baking dish' from it. I know they made skillets, pots, and dutch ovens, and the associated lids. It's typically a sort of orange-brown color, and there were also some pink-ish ones. ...


4

There's so much heat around a turkey deep-fryer I wouldn't see how light or medium snow would affect your cooking. Any snow is going to melt and probably evaporate before it comes into contact with any hot oil, and any that makes contact will be gone in a flash. I've barbequed in 20 below and in snow, all that it really means is that you need more heat. My ...


4

What you're describing sounds normal to me. It's the result of overcooking them. The eggs themselves were fine. At a guess, you unknowingly messed up the timing for the particular batch described here (alternatively, the eggs may have been smaller than usual). Over cooking hard boiled eggs will result in the smell you identified (and also cause the ...


4

It's an old source (1922), but divides the rhubarb into "leaf stalks", "prominent veins," and "leaves." It states that the leaf stalks are the only edible portion.(1) In addition, oxalates are in all parts of the plant. But only specifically stated to be in lower quantities in the stalk (2). In fact, people susceptible to kidney stones can be advised to ...


3

The Pyrex company markets a ceramic product called Pyroflam in Europe which can be used on the stove top. This is an opaque material different from the traditional glass products.


3

All cook top safety is the same: Keep it clean and pay attention! Glass ranges aren't inherently any more unsafe than a gas or normal electric range. Ranges are just a tool, one that generates a large amount of heat in a small area. Like any tool, you can hurt yourself or others if you don't follow the basic rules of use. Luckily, those rules are pretty ...


3

Equipment isn't really as important as knowing how to use it. Many hiker medics travel with nothing but a half roll of duct tape, gauze, and a couple of salves. Stuff like finger bandages and colored band-aids are really just conveniences more than essentials. In a kitchen you have many of the things you need already without buying anything: running water to ...


3

Update based on edited question: there are no issues of toxicity. It is a very poor idea to use glass cookware on a burner. Not all Pyrex is made from high quality borosilicate glass anymore, and even if you have some, the issue is thermal shock, not toxicity. If you heat or cool glass very rapidly, the internal stress caused by thermal expansion (or ...


3

Propane grills mix air with gas before burning it. Ash from charcoal and other contaminants can clog the flue and produce inefficient burning of the gas, possibly produce carbon monoxide (poison) or even gas build up. As long as the gas parts (igniter, flue, pipes, etc) are clean and unaffected, the charcoal, hickory stick, etc, should not cause any ...



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