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13

There are three major properties an edible fat (I am assuming you are not asking about inedible oils like petroleum based products) has that affect how it is best used: Flavor Saturation Smoke point Properties Flavor The flavor of the fat is very important. So called neutral oils (like canola oil or refined grapeseed oil, or refined peanut oil, among ...


8

There is no rule of thumb encompassing all salad dressings. One "rule of thumb" which sometimes gets used is to look at the shelf life of the most perishable component. Frequently it works; sometimes, it is dangerously misleading. A mixture of the things you listed can have a longer or shorter shelf life of that of the most perishable component. An example ...


8

Specifically, the reason you whisk it in slowly at first is to create small drops. If you just dump the oil in fast, it will adhere to itself and make it impossible to break up into droplets dispersed in the vinegar (or other water based liquid, such as lemon juice). This is the definition of an emulsion: tiny droplets of one liquid evenly dispersed in ...


8

The flavors are very different -- white wine vinegar is made from white wine, while white vinegar is made from a distilled spirit. If you had to substitute white wine vinegar, I'd go with one of the following: champagne vinegar (made from sparking wine; tends to be more mild than white wine vinegar) rice vinegar (tends to be more mild / lower acid) cider ...


6

All the blender does is emulsify the mixture--it has no effect on how long it will keep before the dressing begins to spoil or go off. Normally, oil and water do not like to mix. The oil will coalesce into droplets, then rise to the top due to buoyancy, so that you will have a layer of oil above the water-based liquids. Blending the mixture will break up ...


6

A vinaigrette is not a stable emulsion so it will eventually separate- however it will stay together long enough for the salad to be immediately served and eaten. I find that pouring the oil and acid separately creates a salad with a mouthful of olive oil coating the leaves and pool of vinegar at the bottom of the plate. It's true that the acid in a ...


5

I always thought it was the combination of mayonnaise and sour cream (or something like buttermilk) that gives ranch dressing that ever so slightly tang to it. Then add in the seasonings like dill, pepper, and garlic and onion and you've got yourself something delicious.


5

Yes, you should refrigerate. Shelf life of foods which can be stored warm is determined by the fact that they are missing something which bacteria need to survive. For example, flour is missing water. When you mix up several ingredients which can be kept in the pantry separately, you never know when you will be adding back into the mixture whatever was ...


4

The existing answer by SAJ14SAJ addresses the food safety concerns really well. Blending won't change those. But as for taste, it may change earlier. The point is that your blender will introduce more oxygen into the mixture. And even though you have no good physical emulsifiers like mustard, the ingredients are heterogenous enough to act as not-so-good ...


4

Short answer: Homemade salad dressing, even with garlic, is generally considered safe, for a time frame of up to a week. While some strains of botulism can grow slowly at refrigerator temperatures, in general botulism requires three things to grow in addition to having spores present: Low salt, low acid environment Low oxygen environment Temperatures ...


4

Ignore someone. One of my favorite dressings is made with a base of rice vinegar, sesame oil, and ginger. There is nothing besides your personal taste to rule out what vinegar should be used for salads. That said, I'd personally avoid malt vinegar.


4

What is a "bad preservative"? The main additive preservatives used today are ascorbic acid, citric acid, ethanol, salt, sodium nitrate (pink salt), sugar, and vinegar - all of which have been used for centuries, and other than with excessive use, are not seen as harmful Weird chemical preservatives are often only used with weird chemical ingredients, stick ...


4

Your homemade salad dressings will certainly last longer than a few days in the refrigerator. According to Still Tasty, you can keep homemade salad dressing for two weeks in the refrigerator. However, your salad dressing will separate if you do not include an emulsifier. A separated salad dressing just needs to be mixed up again, which may require warming ...


4

They likely used white balsamic vinegar which is not cheap but has the kind of taste that sends people searching on the net ;) In character, it is sweeter than white wine, rice wine, and normal white vinegar and less acidic. btw, you can easily make your awesome own pesto in your blender using fresh basil, pine nuts, and olive oil. If you blanch the basil, ...


3

Emmy, I don't have Potbelly's specific recipe, but most "fat-free" vinagrette dressings rely heavily on corn syrup as a thickener and to dilute the vinegar. Given the sweetness you noticed with the Potbelly dressing, I would guess this to be the case with theirs as well. For example, these are the ingredients in WishBone's Fat Free Red Wine Vinagrette: ...


3

It seems I was looking in the wrong direction here. It seems to have been the Mozzarella cheese. After pouring the dressing over the salad, the cheese started to leak some white liquid, which changed the colour of the dressing. This was something I hadn't on my radar, since I had always used the same brand of cheese, and it had never happened before. I only ...


3

For me, nothing beats balsamic vinegar. The 12 years aged one is still affordable enough to be put on the salad, but I don't recommend it unless you don't like acidity. If you are an sour lover like me, the normal non-aged balsamic vinegar is a good choice. As a very rare alternative for salad dressing, I recommend honey from the Strawberry tree. It is very ...


3

I assume that the recipes also include a weak emulsifier like mustard. In the presence of an emulsifier adding the oil slowly will create an emulsion. The oil will be basically dissolved into the vinegar. This will result in a vinaigrette that will be slightly more viscous and will adhere better to the target food. With weak emulsifiers this is still ...


3

You might try red wine vinegar, or a rice wine vinegar perhaps, maybe even balsamic (I would go young, but I don't think this will taste good). You might just be missing a touch of sweetener like honey or sugar to cut the acid. Depending on how up tight the chef is, they may tell you their recipe, chances are you're not going to get the same thing from ...


2

The purpose of adding oil slowly is to make a smoother emulsion. It will stay together on its own longer this way, but will always separate eventually. You can add a bit of mustard (an emulsifier) to your vinaigrette to keep it stable.


2

My first though was that it has to with the higher efficiency of the blender. Since the blender breaks up the fat into much smaller droplets than what is possible using a shaker or a whisk, that would account for the lighter color. This is also the reason why blended mayonnaise will be opaque and almost white, whereas a hand stirred mayonnaise can be quite ...


2

Sounds like some air bubbles were incorporated in the mix and started to resurface (or blend together?). Generally little air bubbles tend to make a mixture lighter in colour, you can see that, for instance, when you mix sugar and egg yolks. Now, I'm not sure why did it happen once you poured it on the salad...


2

The quickest and dirtiest rule of thumb is thus: "The more acidic it is, the longer it will last." Acid is very unfriendly to bacteria. Ketchup, vinagrette, fruit syrups, all fine. Yes, fruit syrup, even if it's just sugar and acid, will last quite a while (think fruit jelly, and fruit preserves.) Homemade pepper sauce. Anything with a bunch of alcohol in ...


2

Yeah, that's nonsensical advice from your friend. Match the vinegar to the ingredients, season, and other components of your meal. E.g. rice vinegar can be lovely in an Asian context, and it is also prety neutrally flavored so it can have more general use. I generally avoid flavored vinegars (I can add my own flavors), but there are some great varietal wine ...


2

My employer makes vinaigrette dressing professionally and distributes to Kroger stores, Meijer, and other chains. What Adisak mentioned about acidified ingredients is correct. In fact, you could acidify them yourself as we do. Mix the vinegar and flavors together (garlic, spices, etc...), and refrigerate over night. Make sure to blend/puree the ingredients ...


2

So, first of all, pouring oil, then vinegar, directly onto the salad and tossing is a perfectly good way to dress a salad, especially if it's high quality oil and vinegar and that's all you're using. For some salads, like caprese, there's really no other way to dress them. In addition to the problem Sobachatina mentions (that it's hard to get even ...


2

Try adding a bit of egg yolk. The lecithin in that usually helps these things emulsify. Obviously you can't do that if you're young/pregnant/old. If you don't want to try egg yolk. Put everything in but the oil. Add maybe half the oil and shake, then add a bit more and shake. Do it piece by piece as if you were drizzling into a bowl and mixing by hand with ...


2

This recipe just has a lot of liquid in you can see her dressing is very fluid. If you're comparing it to bought dressing this tend to contain thickener to get the desired consistency so this is to be expected. There are lots of other recipes so might be worth finding one with less liquid to dry ingredients: more cheese, or other dry ingredients like ...


2

The most common vinegar for salad dressings I've used in kitchens is apple cider vinegar. It is definitely sweeter than white wine vinegar, and more affordable than balsamic. In fact, I wouldn't recommend balsamic vinegar, as it could easily overpower the flavor of the pesto, leaving you with more of a balsamic vinaigrette. Red wine vinegar is also common, ...


2

In addition to the excellent primer by SAJ14SAJ, I would even more stress smoke point of various oils. Oils burn and give food a nasty flavor if they burn. You should be very careful not to use oil in applications that will cause oil to become higher in temperature than that oil's smoke point. Smoke Points of Oils



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