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17

Tearing is NOT worth the extra effort, tested experimentally. Others have explored the theoretical reasons behind this, so I decided to test it in real life. I did this like so: Green leaf lettuce from the local CSA Cut one leaf with a sharp knife (stainless), and tore the second leaf carefully by hand (fast, clean tears) Pieces were both wrapped in ...


10

First, potato is not the same as potato. Conventionally, potato salad is always made with waxy potatoes, because mealy potatoes' outer layers disintegrate when tossed with the sauce, much like making risotto. They are also less creamy in texture. But there is also the school of using mealy potatoes, because they absorb more seasoning, and also because some ...


10

So, you're making a pico de gallo salad? Throw some fresh garlic and fresh lime juice in there. It's delicious and will prevent salmonella poisoning, which is surprisingly common with uncooked salsas.


10

Refrigerating accomplishes several things: It is the right temperature to get the intended flavor. Flavors change with temperature, and some dishes get the correct taste when cold. Flavors get to blend more. Aromatic spices sometimes take time to soak into the sauce, and liquids absorb into the potatoes more Cold is an easy way to prevent spoilage. ...


9

For a fairly typical thread on this, see: http://www.thekitchn.com/cultural-differences-salad-bef-65008 The so-called reasons I see listed here are consistent with what I found in several different internet discussions of the issue, none of which are scientificially or academically credible: Restaurants serve salad first because it is easiest to get out ...


8

Specifically, the reason you whisk it in slowly at first is to create small drops. If you just dump the oil in fast, it will adhere to itself and make it impossible to break up into droplets dispersed in the vinegar (or other water based liquid, such as lemon juice). This is the definition of an emulsion: tiny droplets of one liquid evenly dispersed in ...


8

Here are a couple reasons why (for which I know) oil is used on salads: Oil caries in fat soluble aromas (often we use aromatic oils like olive oil, pumpkin seed oil, walnut oil, and so on, that are all very aromatic) and balances out other components (like vinegar or lime juice or some strong tasting veggies). it adheres to the surface of many ...


7

It really depends on the texture you are looking for in your finished product. If you want a chunky chicken salad then bake your chicken breasts seasoned or not, I season mine, and then cube them. If you want something a little more exciting pan grill the breasts to the point of a little char and then dice. If you want your chicken to be flavorless and get ...


7

Harold McGee discusses this in On Food And Cooking. From the Preparing Salads section on page 318: If the leaves need to be be divided into smaller pieces, this should be done with the least possible physical pressure, which can crush cells and initiate the development of off-flavours and darkened patches. Cutting with a sharp knife is generally the ...


7

I work around this by serving tomatoes on the top of the individual salads after they've been portioned out. I'm not sure of a way to keep them incorporated.


7

Wilting in greens is triggered by temperature, pH, and salt content. To reduce wilting, you can cool the vegetables or shrimp, make the vegetables more acidic*, or decrease their salt content. My suggestion would be to cool the shrimp with an ice water bath or cold running water. This is the most traditional approach for shrimp salad. Alternately, you ...


7

It's interesting that the two main choices you've asked about are before or after the main entrée course. In my experience in England and in continental Europe (Spain, Italy, France etc.) the salad is served as a side dish alongside the main or entrée course and is intended to be eaten alongside this course sometimes in place of some form of vegetable dish. ...


7

Using both is fine. I would reserve some of the green end to sprinkle on top for presentation. The white part is stronger so you may want to add it a little at a time.


6

I have eaten a salad that included watermelon, tomatoes, feta and black olives. I thought it was... ok, not earth shattering. Also I made this Cherry/Tomato bite, which is in that genre, and certainly was interesting from a taste perspective. There are no rules, you can do whatever you like, you just have to determine if it will taste good. Personally I ...


6

Direct substitution options would include sour cream, plain yogurt, or cottage cheese pureed in your blender to do a one-to-one substitution, but I don't know that these would necessarily solve your issue of having the salad sit out with ingredients that could spoil. This question has a whole list of substitutes. Tofu is one that might suit your needs, ...


6

Not too surprisingly given where you found it, it's called an Israeli Salad in most parts of the world. In Israel, it's just called a chopped salad or (according to the wiki article - I never personally encountered this) an Arab salad.


6

Fast home made salads are possible with a few different but just as tasty ingredients. Some things to try that you can buy pre-prepared You can buy catering bags of ham and salami pre-chopped for pizza making purposes. Freeze in small portion bags suitable for a few days, and take one out of the freezer and put in fridge every few days as required Roasted ...


6

A vinaigrette is not a stable emulsion so it will eventually separate- however it will stay together long enough for the salad to be immediately served and eaten. I find that pouring the oil and acid separately creates a salad with a mouthful of olive oil coating the leaves and pool of vinegar at the bottom of the plate. It's true that the acid in a ...


6

The browning of Lettuce leaves are due to the reaction of polyphenol(a chemical in any fruit or vegetable) and enzymes. This is due to two main causes: Aging Cell damage (i.e. from cutting, tearing) Every cell has separate chambers for these two, if they somehow leak, and get mixed up, this would cause browning. Cutting and tearing cause damage to the ...


6

My advice is simple -- don't plan ahead. Being fresh produce, most of us have no idea before you get to the store what the current stuff coming out of the local fields are. This is going to affect both price (in season stuff that hasn't been shipped from the opposite hemisphere is typically cheaper, especially w/ today's fuel prices), and quality (how long ...


5

The main things that Parmesan cheese can add to a salad are fattiness and salt. The first thing that comes to mind for me is bacon. You could probably also make a yummy main dish salad (or hearty first course) by adding duck or a cured meat such as salami. If you're not interested in adding meat, how about olives? Those would serve similar purposes. Other ...


5

Are they lactose intolerant? Because old hard cheeses like parmesan (and grana padano) have very little lactose in them. Lactose is consumed and converted into lactic acid by the cheese-making bacteria...Generally after 3 months or so, there is very little left. Some people are much more lactose intolerant than others, but many people who are otherwise ...


5

I know this may depart from the answer you are looking for but put it in a bowl of ice. Not your potato salad the bowl your potato salad is in. A picnic in extreme heat could only last a couple of hours and as long as you check on your ice and give it a stir every once in awhile you should be gtg (good to go). Anything longer and the people at the picnic ...


5

There are many different varieties of potato salad. I've had an excellent one that was actually made from mashed potatoes. (starchy potatoes cooked, mashed, then the other ingredients mixed in; there was celery and other vegetables to add variety so it wasn't all mush) America's Test Kitchen has an excellent recipe for an Austrian-style potato salad where ...


5

The Food Lab did some experimenting with potato salad and found that you should.. Season the potatoes while they're hot (or season the water they cook in). The seasonings won't absorb once the potatoes cool. Add vinegar to the water that the potatoes are cooking in. This will prevent them from breaking apart. Use Russet potatoes. They absorb seasonings ...


5

In my experience lettuce will brown faster if cut instead of torn. However as most people are consuming the lettuce within the day, cutting won't make much of a difference if you plan on serving within the hour. It will generally show up the next morning. Iceberg and Romaine are the two lettuce types that come to mind as being nasty for browning. Also ...


5

Tearing lettuce is worth the effort It takes a reasonably similar amount of time as cutting, and a different but comparable amount of work. If you are planning on eating the salad soon, all the above comments apply as to the browning effect. However, browning isn't the only consideration when deciding between cutting and tearing. Texture is as essential ...


4

Ignore someone. One of my favorite dressings is made with a base of rice vinegar, sesame oil, and ginger. There is nothing besides your personal taste to rule out what vinegar should be used for salads. That said, I'd personally avoid malt vinegar.


4

halloumi or feta for cheese substitutes, especially if you can get the mint halloumi cheese. as for ham substitute, I'd recommend toasted pita (served on top of the salad where you let the eater crush the bread themselves) or smoked salmon


4

Another option is a commercial product called Vegenaise. You should be able to find it at any health food type store, or Whole Foods. It is really quite a good substitute; not quite as much flavor as say Best Foods / Hellman's, but close, and a near identical texture.



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