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15

Have you tried straining the salsa? Put it in a coffee filter or in some cheesecloth in a sieve sitting over a bowl. Let drain until the salsa's the texture you want.


10

Chipotle chiles, especially in adobo sauce (e.g., here), give an excellent smoky flavor. You should be able to find these in your grocery store in the Mexican section.


10

There's a few types of salsa -- salsa fresca (aka pico de gallo, aka salsa cruda), which is "fresh salsa" and uncooked, and if made fresh, it shouldn't be too watery (unless you add to much liquid, eg, lime juice), but letting the vegetables sit after salting will start to draw out extra liquid and could become watery. For truly thick salsa, you have to ...


8

You cannot preserve just any salsa recipe (unless you're just freezing it). Tomatoes are on the border between acidic and non-acidic foods. What this means is that they can be water-bath canned if they are sufficiently high in acid; but, if they are low in acid, they need to be pressure canned. If you want to be sure to avoid trouble, follow a tested ...


8

Recipes As far as salsa recipes go, they're all over the web. Check sites like allrecipes.com or epicurious.com - - or justrightmenus.com! Shelf Life Refrigerator. With regard to shelf life, according to stilltasty.com, you're only going to get 5-7 days out of fresh salsa in the refrigerator. Freezer. The same source says you can keep it for 1-2 ...


7

Don't forget cumin! Cumin imparts an earthy smoky flavor. One of my favorite store bought salsas is Trader Joe's Double Roasted Salsa. If I were stranded on a desert island, an endless supply of this would be one of my must-haves. It uses double roasted anaheim peppers and cumin to achieve it's amazing flavor. Here's the ingredient list: Tomatoes, ...


7

It depends on what sort of a smoky flavor you're looking for. I've used chipotle peppers before, but you can also grill the peppers, onions and even tomatoes to get some char on them before chopping them up. (well, the onions I slice before roasting or grilling, then dice them afterwards).


6

A standard tomato implies that there is a standard salsa, which there isn't - but let's stick with your specific case of pico de gallo AKA salsa cruda. The distinguishing characteristic of salsa cruda is that it uses raw tomatoes - the cruda literally means raw. Since you aren't going to be cooking them, and since water is going to be your primary binding ...


6

My partner has a very sensitive "dirt-flavor" sense... One of the ingredients that may be found in salsa that often triggers it for her is cumin.


5

I wouldn't trust any store brand to omit seeds entirely; it's just not going to be a priority for them. I'd suggest making your own instead. It's fairly easy and fast to seed tomatoes using a chinois, and to seed peppers using a knife. And it'll taste better, too! BTW, many online medical authorities seem to think that seeds are not actually an issue ...


5

The Pico de Gallo I make (plum tomatoes, white onion, fresh jalapeno peppers, lime juice, a tiny bit of olive oil and chopped fresh cilantro, salt and pepper) will last approximately 1 week if kept in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Over that time the tomatoes will get a little mushy and the cilantro will wilt. Perhaps you can have everything else ...


5

In general, if jars are improperly processed or don't seal, you reprocess them exactly the same way you did the first time. This doesn't depend on the original recipe; you just have to do the exact same thing over again. In your case, since it sounds like your original process was hot pack, you would have to open the jars, dump out the salsa and reheat it, ...


5

I've lived in Austin for 15+ years, I lived a couple miles from the TX-Mexico border until I was nine years old. I have prepared many salsas at home and tasted many at restaurants and homes. My general advice on salsa is: Pick a base (Tomato or Tomatillo (or both!)) Add onion and/or garlic. Add dried or fresh chiles (e.g., guajillo, ancho, chipotle or ...


5

In their various parts of the world, all of these words mean sauce, at least some of the time. They come from different cultures, though, and carry different connotations at least in US usage. Short answer, though: there are no absolute differences that you can count on. Salsa This is a generic term in Spanish, and in South American cuisines. It can ...


5

Acid is your friend here. You have some lemon, and tomatoes are acidic, but apparently that isn't enough. You should get at least a good week out of fresh salsa (mine lasts longer than that). Try adding a good shot of plain, distilled vinegar. Many recipes for salsa (including my own) include vinegar; add as much as you can without negatively affecting the ...


4

If you remove the liquid and seeds from your tomatoes, that should increase the chunkiness. Also to remove liquid from tomatoes, consider giving them a whirl in a salad spinner.


4

You could try to add a teaspoon or two of smoked paprika. That gives a good smoky depth to the flavour, without being overbearing. Not the classic answer perhaps, but definitely my fusion/experimental idea.


4

Salsa in Mexico is normally used for calling a spicy hot dressing that you will put in the table so people can serve them selves and spread it over their dishes or inside their tacos. As we do it in the center of Mexico it must be very (spicy) hot, there are different kinds: fresh, cooked: boiled, grilled. The most common used fresh salsa is the Pico de ...


3

Chipotle chiles in adobo sauce are the most likely source. Most people don't use a whole can at once so when you open it, use what you need and then set the remaining peppers on a parchment/waxed paper lined baking tray and freeze them individually. Once frozen, pop them in to a zip-top bag so you can retrieve one or two as needed in the future. Save the ...


3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salsa_(sauce) If you're talking about typical american salsa, the main concept seems to be tomato, hot pepper, onion as a base for the recipe. The sauce is not usually cooked, although ingredients may be cooked separately (like roasting the jalapenos or garlic).


3

I'll keep this simple. Tomatoes, onions, jalapenos--cilantro, garlic, lime juice, salt, pepper. Dice, food process, or blend for desired texture, add jalapenos to taste, cilantro and garlic to preference, and salt as needed. Squeeze in some lime juice. Quickly grill or roast any of the main ingredients for a smoky flavor. I've had good results with ...


2

Just chop tomatoes roughly and leave them in a strainer overnight in the fridge. It helps your salsa to have a better consistency.


2

If it's a salsa that you want avocado in, a relatively soft avocado cut up and mixed in will kind of dissolve, and thicken things up a bit.


2

Most salsas are pretty acidic. If that is the case with this one you should be able to safely can it without a pressure canner.


2

There are many different recipes because there are many different salsas. Pick three or four recipes, and try them all. Then make up your own.


2

TFD, You can use a food processor for this, the trick is not to overprocess. I have some "mini-choppers" I used to keep around for exactly this kind of task. Here's the steps: Roughly chop the herbs, into about equal-sized pieces. Pulse them in the mini-chopper for 5s to 10s at a time. This may require mixing them around with a small spatula between ...


2

Even for 12 servings, the total quantity of herbs is small; so, in my opinion, the best way to chop it is with knife. Maybe you need to improve your technique. Use a big sharp knife, on a big cutting surface. Get all the herbs aligned and press them together with your left hand (or your right hand if you are lefty like me) in a tight pile over the ...


2

The tomato variety used (for centuries) in most parts of Mexico for making salsa is the one called "Jitomate" the Jitomate is a (red) tomato that has an oval form and a belly button, normally smaller than round tomato. Its flavor is more intense than the round tomato, it is ideal for pico de gallo, boiled and grilled sauces. In the us you can find it in most ...


2

If we go by the seed companies, the fresh salsa tomato is a variety of plum tomato. And I agree with Michael -- I prefer plum tomatoes varieties for pico de gallo, in part because they have a lot more 'meat' to them than seeds & gel, and seem to hold up a bit better after they've been salted.


2

Salsa means sauce, but there are a great variety of salas to be had. It sounds like you would like a fairly chunky tomato salsa. There are many approaches to this, and an infinite variety of recipes. There is no single answer to how you would prepare your tomatoes. Choose your preparation method based on the the outcome you like. Many tomato salsas are ...



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