Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Food grade salt (Sodium Chloride) in most parts of the world is evaporated from sea water. It generally does not have any detectable mercury, though it does have many other trace elements, some of which are normal dietary minerals Mined salt (rock salt) is generally used for industrial purposes and de-icing, it contains "dirt", but generally not mercury. In ...


5

Salt mixed into hamburger results in patties that have the consistency of sausage instead of a good burger. Brining is totally unnecessary for ground meat. It is a mechanism for conveying flavor into meat, helping reduce moisture loss, and increasing the illusion of tenderness. None of these are necessary with ground meat because it is ground! It will ...


4

Yes! Try to avoid salted butter in cooking and baking. If you must use it you will need to adjust, but I am not sure there is a consistent way to do this. Different brands probably have different salt content.


4

Mercury builds up in tuna to significant levels thanks to them eating thousands of critters that in turn eat thousands of critters with tiny little bits of mercury, and it all adding up. It's not about mercury levels in the ocean, per se. It's also a heavy metal so it's not likely to be simply floating around in the water that is evaporated to retrieve the ...


4

Depending on how much salt is on them, and how it's been applied, you might be able to knock some of it off, and effectively decant it: Place the peanuts into a hard-sided container at least twice the volume of the peanuts that you can seal tightly. Shake the peanuts. A lot. Not too hard, though, as the goal is to knock some of the salt off, not to smash ...


2

I have rinsed salted nuts well in water to remove the excessive salt and then dried in the oven. Since salted nuts are already roasted, they don't "roast again" very well at all (or in general behave like raw peanuts when cooked) but you can certainly rinse to remove excess salt and dry at low temperatures. If you want to just eat them immediately you can ...


2

Bring a saucepan of water to the boil, then add the peanuts and a small potato and simmer for half an hour. The salt will travel from the surface of the peanuts into the potato, which you can then discard. Since the peanuts are for peanut butter, boiling them shouldn't affect the final taste, though you can try a lower temperature if you're concerned, or ...


2

Remove all surface salt by quickly rinsing them and thoroughly drying them as fast as possible.


1

What has been said to you in the answer and comments are all correct. Let me add my 44 years of experience to you which should solve this problem. Make your own crust and use sweet, unsalted butter. You might have added salt instead of sugar in the crust if you made your crust. A very easy mistake. Also as a master cheesecake maker (creamy style baked, ...


1

You could put them in an industrial sifter and use that to knock the salt off and separate the peanuts from the salt in one step, but that's probably overkill unless you have a lot of nuts. Instead knock the salt off first, either with the shaking method that Joe mentioned or by placing the nuts between two sheets of clean fabric or clean, food safe paper ...


1

You really can't un-ring that bell...you can, however, dilute the "extra salty" peanuts with other, unsalted, peanuts until the you get the desired saltiness in your peanut butter.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible