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21

This is what America's Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has to say about it: Sometimes baked potatoes can use a flavor boost. And instead of light and fluffy, most often they are dense and crumbly. We found that baking the potatoes on a bed of salt remedied these problems. Moisture that escaped the potatoes during baking was trapped in the enclosed pan, ...


8

There are many roasting recipes that use a bed or even a dome of salt. This has three effects that I am aware of- 1- It salts the food obviously. This isn't necessarily a reason all by itself. As you noticed salt is just as easily added later. 2- It keeps the food off the pan. In the case of fish this can make for easier service. 3- The salt becomes part ...


7

Because as you are cooking your soup, water in your soup is evaporating away as steam. You might salt a soup perfectly halfway through, but after evaporation, your now thicker soup is too salty. When adding salt, wait until the end of the cooking process, as soups will reduce and concentrate the flavors as the liquid evaporates. [ Source: ...


5

You are correct in that salt fish are very salty. Where we live salt herrings are a tradition. The way to remove the saltiness is to soak them, changing the water every few hours. The trick here to really getting the saltiness out is to split the back. (The belly should already be split.) This is really important. I once had someone cook them for my ...


3

A wonderful classic dish from Europe starts with salt cod. You soak it for 24 hours with many changes of water, just in a bowl in the fridge, then cook it in milk until it softens. Then you make a mash from the cooked cod, some potatoes, and cloves of garlic that you gently cook in olive oil. Finally whip the olive oil into the mashed up fish/potato/garlic ...


2

Normally one would salt a soup or sauce to taste before serving, not early in the cooking process. When a soup boils, it's flavors concentrate as water is evaporated off. It is easy for it to become too salty if you add salt to taste before concentrating the broth, and it's much easier to add a little salt than try to remove it.... Also, the amount of ...


2

A good rule of thumb is to soak the fish for 1 day per centimeter of the thickest part of the fish. That's the general rule for dried fishin Norway.


2

Lime juice, tamarind paste, vinegars, mango powder, sour yogarts are what I use with a little as possible of table salt.


1

I assume you are making a brine? Such as pastrami, corned beef, pickled pork, etc. If so, you probably want to go with kosher or pickling salt. Both are pure salt, and pickling salt is ground more finely to facilitate mixing with cold or lukewarm brines. You can use iodized, table, or sea salt, but there are additives in them to prevent sticking that can ...


1

Short answer: Not really. Doing some armchair math, you have two liters of water and 55g of salt, which is about 0.25 liter. That gives you 12.5% the amount salt as there is water in your original solution. The logical solution would be to then cook the meat, then measure the quantity of salt afterwards, right? However... That would assume that the ...


1

Unfortunatly, the amount of salt you used will not allow the fermentation process to occur. It will preserve the cabbage and is perfectly safe to eat, but it will not be fermented, therefor not saurkraut. I would advise just tossing it and making some more. After it has fermented it will be tasty, and if you want you can rinse some salt off then but it ...



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