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7

Because as you are cooking your soup, water in your soup is evaporating away as steam. You might salt a soup perfectly halfway through, but after evaporation, your now thicker soup is too salty. When adding salt, wait until the end of the cooking process, as soups will reduce and concentrate the flavors as the liquid evaporates. [ Source: ...


5

You are correct in that salt fish are very salty. Where we live salt herrings are a tradition. The way to remove the saltiness is to soak them, changing the water every few hours. The trick here to really getting the saltiness out is to split the back. (The belly should already be split.) This is really important. I once had someone cook them for my ...


3

A wonderful classic dish from Europe starts with salt cod. You soak it for 24 hours with many changes of water, just in a bowl in the fridge, then cook it in milk until it softens. Then you make a mash from the cooked cod, some potatoes, and cloves of garlic that you gently cook in olive oil. Finally whip the olive oil into the mashed up fish/potato/garlic ...


2

Normally one would salt a soup or sauce to taste before serving, not early in the cooking process. When a soup boils, it's flavors concentrate as water is evaporated off. It is easy for it to become too salty if you add salt to taste before concentrating the broth, and it's much easier to add a little salt than try to remove it.... Also, the amount of ...


2

A good rule of thumb is to soak the fish for 1 day per centimeter of the thickest part of the fish. That's the general rule for dried fishin Norway.



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