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10

Thank you, all of you, who contributed by answers or comments to the thinking that leads now to this answer. I listened to all of you, and it worked. I can't describe how tickled I am. Your suggestions opened my mind to thinking that this could still "work" even if it didn't quite go as I hoped. As it turned out, the end product exceeded my hopes. This is ...


9

No, it won't help you at all. Your vegetables aren't being eaten by bacteria or similar (and this is a good thing, foods which are rendered unsafe by bacteria shouldn't be kept more than 4 hours at room temperature). They are simply wilting. There is no way to stop the wilting process. It is the plant cells dying off and stopping being able to "take care ...


8

No! A cup of salt is an enormous amount and would be dangerous for anyone who ate it, although they are unlikely to be able to swallow it in the first place as it would taste awful. Preserving vegetables can be done with or without preservative agents like sugar, salt, and acid but you won't be able to use your bread machine's jam making function. I would ...


5

In a pancake recipe, it is unlikely to be a practical concern. The reason these ideas get started is because: Small recipes have intentional rounding-off errors to make measurements simple (1/2 tsp for example, instead of .4321 teaspoons) Scaling up may magnify error In yeast raised doughs, where yeast grows exponentially over time, scaling yeast up ...


5

No, salting or spraying alcohol on your vegetables will not help keep them fresh at all, in fact salting them would probably have the opposite effect. You are probably connecting the fact that salt is used as a preservative with keeping food fresh, but these are 2 different concepts. Keeping things fresh involves trying to keep a plant metabolizing as long ...


4

I boiled 2 cups of regular sea salt to completely dissolve in 1 cup water then put it in a flat tray in the dehydrator on the jerky setting - the next day I did have a load of big crackly crystals and some dust.


4

If you're in the US, labeling laws actually make it pretty easy to know exactly how much salt is in your butter, and yes, it varies by brand. Salt is sodium chloride, it's 40% sodium by weight. Land O Lakes salted butter (my go-to brand) has 90mg of sodium per tablespoon. That means it has 225mg of salt per tablespoon, or 1.8 grams per stick, 7.2 grams per ...


4

You can use Kosher salt or sea salt or even table salt but keep in mind that they are interchangeable by weight NOT volume. Volumetric measurements fail because of different sizes and shapes of salt crystals. Kosher salt crystals are, as you pointed out, larger and end up with larger gaps between the crystals when measured by volume than the smaller table ...


4

If you make a bread without salt, you will have to make the dough dryer as well. Salt (for lack of a better word) competes with gluten and yeast for moisture. Without the salt, the yeast will work a bit faster (this effect isn't that pronounced) and the gluten will be very soft. The effect on the gluten usually causes loaves without salt to fall flat as the ...


4

No, these are completely different products. As you indicate, so called "pink salt" is a mixture of sodium chloride (regular salt) and sodium nitrate (or sodium nitrite) for curing meats, tinted pink to distinguish it from regular table salt. it allows relatively accurate small batch curing, as in home sausage making. Himalayan pink salt is a naturally ...


4

I don't understand what you are trying to achieve here. Food, or at least vegetables, is spoiled by bacteria (sometimes also mould). Bacteria need quite a few factors to maintain homeostasis and live. They can't live if 1) a toxin is present, or 2) their living conditions are not met. When you preserve food, you remove one of the conditions bacteria need ...


4

Fresh olives aren't salty, but they are very bitter. Thus they almost always cured and fermented to remove the bitter compounds. Salt is the most common curing medium, hence olives that you buy in the shops are usually salty.


4

Add more potatoes--they absorb the salt. As would rice or pasta.


4

If you stay with the same ratio of salt (and any other ingredients) to water that you normally use, you should achieve the same results. As you normally use a 5% solution it shouldn't matter how many chickens or how much water if you stay with the 5% solution. The only thing that the weight of the chickens will factor into is the amount of brining time ...


3

In my experience, you can reduce the amount of salt more (up to 100%) in white bread than you can wholemeal/brown. Less salt in a wholemeal loaf and it doesn't seem to rise as much, and the consistency is different (I have not tried varying the amount of moisture as suggested above). In a white loaf, I can't see much difference in this regard. As has been ...


3

It seems like you would season the water/stock with salt from the meat. The amount is unreliable, and would be based on cooking time, salinity of the meat, size of cut, mineral content of the water, etc. I am not sure about meat, but a few answers regarding potatoes on a quick google search state that boiling denatures protiens and ruptures cell membranes. ...


3

Here is a snarky but historically enlightening article on the combination from Slate magazine. 1) Salt enhances flavors that already exist in the food. Here is an article discussing the science behind the phenomenon from the ScienceFare site. 2) Pepper brightens flavor, and masks off-putting notes, such as staleness or blandness from overcooking. Black ...


3

http://www.aaccnet.org/publications/cc/backissues/1987/Documents/64_106.pdf This study from "Cereal Chem. 64(2):106-109" was helpful in answering the question. One example: Using 71 gm Dry Spaghetti, 592cc water, 2.6 g salt (based on 5.5gm salt/tsp): 100mg cooked spaghetti contained 1.8 mg Na prior to cooking, 0.9 mg Na when cooked in unsalted tap water, ...


3

A cursory internet and pubmed search did not yield any historical/traditional/cultural food-ties to this quaternary ammonium salt compound for me. Personally, I would not feel comfortable using this in a home setting because it can be toxic in small quantities. To my knowledge, ammoniac is used in agriculture (with pesticides and as an industrial ...


3

Minerals, naturally found in salt whether it's mined or evaporated; and believe it or not, water. Infosa In the US, the FDA requires that salt must not contain more than 2.5% minerals other that NaCl and still call itself salt. That 2.5% does not include water. HowStuffWorks Your numbers for sodium content seem a bit low, but not extremely so, especially for ...


2

The addition of salt has at least 2 things going for it: 1). It DOES help keep the pasta from cooking into water, thus improving texture (less sticky/gummy). When less of the starch and protein is leached out of the pasta, it will foam less as well! (Perform the 2 batch test, side by side. The salted water will foam less, and it will be less murky when the ...


2

Tuna captured by purse seiners or baitboats or jigboats in many cases are preserved and frozen in salt brine. it would have absorbed salt, just a fact. Other fresh tuna could have been stored in chilled seawater and would have picked up salt a well. In these cases the salt would have been higher on the skin edge. Well described in: ...


2

Even easier method - Bring a pot of water to a boil. Pour the nuts into a strainer and hold over the steam shaking the contents occasionally to get moisture spread throughout the mixture. Remove from steam. Spread the nuts out on a plate and sprinkle with salt or other seasoning


2

What "processed meat" includes exactly is going to depend on who is talking about it. Thankfully, reputable sources of health claims ultimately go back to various studies, which will define what they mean by the term. For example, Meat consumption and mortality - results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition explains how they ...


2

Despite the fashion of using "processed" as if it is a derogatory term, and processed foods are dangerous, almost all foods are processed in some way(s). Most of us, for example, do not chew wheat berries directly off the stalks, but prefer them threshed, hulled, ground into flour, and then baked into breads or other foods. What is that, if not ...


2

It is certainly possible to make bread without salt. You would adjust the initial quantity of yeast and proofing times to get the desired outcome (it sounds like your loaves are over-proofing). The thing is, it would taste terrible. Enhancing the flavor is the more important role of salt in bread, not just governing the growth rate of the yeast.


2

Kosher salt is fine. The salt crystals should dissolve without a problem. You should season at the beginning and end of cooking - add salt with, say, the onions and spices, then season to your taste at the end, after any reduction of gravy.


2

Yes, you can, and this the way you are most likely to exsperience the textural difference of this type of salt; most people cannot detect any flavor difference for various mineralized or natural salts under test conditions, but this is the manner it is most likely to make a perceptible difference in flavor.


2

There is no such thing as "lower quality cream" although there are variations in taste. All milk has a slightly different water to fat ratio. In general, animal milk is 80% water, 5% protein and 5% fat. Cream is the fatty part of milk skimmed off. Cream will typically be 35% fat (though in different cultures it varies from 20% to 75%). Cream also has some ...


2

Speculative: Another way would be to borrow a technique used by makers of jawbreakers and pyrotechnics: Coating a seed with powder Seed: big grains of salt--but not too big for your wonderful sounding ice cream! Powder: powdered sugar Stick with me, we'll carmelize it later ... In a rotating can at least six inches across and six inches deep at about ...



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