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22

In a very real sense, yes, that is a true statement. Virtually all sodium chloride on earth was formed in the ocean. It’s a bit of a misnomer to consider “ocean” to be synonymous with “sea”; technically, and according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration there is a difference: Many people use the terms "ocean" and "sea" interchangeably ...


9

I agree with @rumtscho that you should not need to salt after brining. However, I totally disagree with the accepted answer. There are simply too many reputable sources that say otherwise, not to mention my own experience. First, please see the accepted answer to this question which is from Cook's Illustrated. Secondly, this article from Stella ...


8

2% (20g per 1000g) would be my default recommendation based on sources local to me, but with care less salt may work if sanitation is extremely good (to minimize introduction of undesirable bacteria which the salt helps to supress.) On the high end, I can say that 4% seems to slow things down, but work, and 8% seems to be simply too much. The pictured jars ...


8

Salt is not a herb or a spice that loses its specific properties over time. It's a mineral and is salty since millions of years. It will still be salty if you're already gone. No need to worry here! It will be salty long enough.


5

There's no single answer, as there's a few considerations here: Was it ground meat, or a larger chunk? How far cooked was it already? How far over-salted is it? Is it being cooked in some sort of sauce or other liquid? Depending on the answer to those: If it's not over-salted by much ... serve it with a sauce that hasn't been salted, serve it on top of ...


5

Yes and no. Sea Salt is salt that is harvested by evaporating natural brine - seawater, typically. Table salt is salt that is mined and processed for purity of color and flavor, and sometimes adulterated with nutrients like iodine and anti-clumping agents. The two will taste very different, as Sea Salt will have trace minerals and even biological elements ...


4

It depends upon how much you expect the broth to be reduced while making the dish, and how salty the other ingredients in the dish are. Risotto is a good example of a dish that should be made with a broth less salty than would be ideal for just drinking. The broth will be reduced significantly while making the risotto (so the salt will become more ...


3

Maybe you have heard of osmosis. Putting salt into the water when boiling vegetables (which are also slightly salty) will prevent water from entering the vegetables, hence decreasing the overall flavor of the vegetables.


3

As stated in the Wikipedia article about the salt, the pink color that sometimes occurs is due to iron oxide: Himalayan salt is predominantly sodium chloride (95-98%), contaminated with 2–3% polyhalite and small amounts of ten other minerals. The pink color is due to the presence of iron oxide. As a source, the article references this page on ...


3

You may need to practice sprinkling salt -- Get a large piece of paper or plastic, that's preferably not white. Sprinkle some salt on it. Try from different heights. You might also try different types of salt (I find coarser salts easier to control) Roll up the paper (or plastic), so you can pour the salt back into a small dish to try again. Once ...


3

I can't read the minds of all the recipe authors, but I do have a couple ideas. I've found it's definitely easy to overdo salt in ice cream. A very small quantity goes a long way. In most cases you don't actually want it to taste salty, you just want a tiny hint that people will only notice as improved flavor. The quantities are small enough that it'll be ...


3

I checked a few German Sources1 and found a range between 7.5g salt per kg cabbage2 and 20g salt per kg cabbage3. So anywhere between one and a generous two teaspoons per kilogram (two pounds) should be fine. But what exactly is the salt doing in your cabbage/sauerkraut? Well, in theory you could leave it out. The bacteria and yeasts necessary for ...


3

You've answered this question yourself. Flavor in bread comes from: salt yeast action and to a lesser degree fat sugar Obviously you have plenty of fat and sugar. As you suspect, your yeasty flavor will be improved by letting it rise longer in the fridge. Flat flavor in bread is almost always because of not enough salt. I agree with you that you ...


3

It's quite possible that meat might even be improved. From an article at Serious Eats : Indeed, the absolute best steak I had was one that I had salted on both sides then allowed to rest on a rack overnight in the refrigerator uncovered. It appears to dry out slightly, but it's only superficial—the amount of drying that occurs from an overnight rest ...


3

There are a few things I can think of that would help: Sprinkle the salt over the surface rather than dumping a blob in one place. Add the salt in multiple additions, stirring between each. Stir sufficiently to distribute. I made pancakes a few months ago and forgot the salt. After eating the first couple, I realized the mistake and added salt to attempt ...


2

Chemically the pits etched in your pot are the absence of the stainless steel material that makes up the pot. In other words the white spots you're seeing are where a small amount of the stainless steel has been removed from the surface of the pot, much like it had been scraped off. So the pits are completely harmless because they're not actually any kind of ...


2

Yes. In fact, many, many people believe (falsely) that adding salt before or during cooking will keep beans hard (a myth addressed in your first link), and most of these people have been cooking perfectly good beans for many years without adding salt until the beans were fully cooked. The cooking time may vary slightly. In some circumstances, the texture ...


2

Consider looking at the situation from a different perspective. Canned mushrooms are an inferior substitute for fresh mushrooms. Whatever benefit they add to the recipe, would likely be improved by using fresh mushrooms. Instead of attempting to pre-process your fresh mushrooms to make them more like canned mushrooms, why not simply adjust your recipe to ...


2

Before cooking, Remove any packaging and soak in cold water for 4 - 6 hours changing the water once or twice


2

In addition to more salt you should consider a few things to improve your flavor. One primary piece of advice would be to try other flours. AP flour is the dullest possible base for bread, and even with more salt, sugar, fat, and a long rise in the fridge there's only so much flavor you are going to get. Malted barley flour, malted wheat flakes, and oat ...


1

Salt is very soluble in water, and during the cooking process will tend to diffuse within the liquids of the food and permeate inside. Having a salty flavor throughout the food I find tends to help curb salt usage. A good example is pasta, where if you add salt you can achieve a salty taste for the pasta and largely decrease salt you add at the table. My ...


1

You could chemically create table salt by literally reacting chlorine and sodium (do not attempt to do so in your kitchen :), or by any number of anorganic reactions, or by burning organic matter and isolating the salt therein - but even here, the sodium and chlorine will have originally come from sea salt. And there would be no likely reason to use such an ...


1

Sprinkling salt on top won't have the same effect as mixing it in the batter, you'll get a big salt hit all at once and then nothing in the brownie itself which I wouldn't expect to be very pleasant. Some recipes withhold some of the salt from the brownie and put it in a sauce for the top like a salted caramel drizzle. This works because it's not pure salt ...


1

All the other information presented here is correct and the main problem is liquor licenses. I use the salted variety often out of convenience and price, but it is a lower quality and well, heavily salted. Typically, if I'm using the wine, I'll just reduce salt elsewhere. If you can't find an unsalted variety and really want something that works well, as an ...


1

Unless you use everything that can be a salt source (soy sauces, fermented whatever pastes, black beans and sauces, chili-garlic-sauces, stocks, pickled chilies and vegetables...) in a chinese style dish by the exact brands and amounts the recipe writer used, you will have to manage the salt (and acid/sugar) balance yourself anyway. If you need to replicate ...


1

The vinegar should still introduce enough acidity for it not to matter. A couple of tablespoon is not enough for a brine anyway.


1

With that level of salt, I think it was more for flavor rather than curing properties. They'll be safe, but they'll probably taste somewhat flat.


1

The "celery" component of the salt is just there for flavor, and shouldn't affect how the dish cooks. Celery has a deeply vegetal flavor that can enhance others in the dish (hence why you see it in many soups, stews, and braises) but there's enough else in this preparation that you probably won't miss it much. I wouldn't try to use regular flour, though. ...


1

Stock solutions and eye droppers work for this. a solution at 25 grams salt in 100 ml water (well within solubility limits) Will give you 0.25 gram salt or about 0.1 gram sodium (salt is 39% sodium). Every standard eye dropper I've ever tested yielded remarkably close to 1 ml per squeeze. A teaspoon of the liquid would deliver about 0.5 gram sodium, while a ...


1

No, I do not cook my brined chicken with added salt. I always brine chicken overnight with maybe a bit more salt than is standard. The next day, I rinse and soak it briefly in clear water, then cook it without adding salt. It is always salty enough from the brine and very few people eating at my table ever add salt. From my taste buds, I believe chicken ...



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