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22

In a very real sense, yes, that is a true statement. Virtually all sodium chloride on earth was formed in the ocean. It’s a bit of a misnomer to consider “ocean” to be synonymous with “sea”; technically, and according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration there is a difference: Many people use the terms "ocean" and "sea" interchangeably ...


9

I agree with @rumtscho that you should not need to salt after brining. However, I totally disagree with the accepted answer. There are simply too many reputable sources that say otherwise, not to mention my own experience. First, please see the accepted answer to this question which is from Cook's Illustrated. Secondly, this article from Stella ...


7

2% (20g per 1000g) would be my default recommendation based on sources local to me, but with care less salt may work if sanitation is extremely good (to minimize introduction of undesirable bacteria which the salt helps to supress.) On the high end, I can say that 4% seems to slow things down, but work, and 8% seems to be simply too much. The pictured jars ...


7

Food grade salt (Sodium Chloride) in most parts of the world is evaporated from sea water. It generally does not have any detectable mercury, though it does have many other trace elements, some of which are normal dietary minerals Mined salt (rock salt) is generally used for industrial purposes and de-icing, it contains "dirt", but generally not mercury. In ...


6

The simple answer is: people can taste (and smell, when the substance in question has a smell) substances in very low concentrations. A pinch of salt is not a small amount at all, it is a sufficient amount to be tasted.


5

Salt mixed into hamburger results in patties that have the consistency of sausage instead of a good burger. Brining is totally unnecessary for ground meat. It is a mechanism for conveying flavor into meat, helping reduce moisture loss, and increasing the illusion of tenderness. None of these are necessary with ground meat because it is ground! It will ...


5

Yes and no. Sea Salt is salt that is harvested by evaporating natural brine - seawater, typically. Table salt is salt that is mined and processed for purity of color and flavor, and sometimes adulterated with nutrients like iodine and anti-clumping agents. The two will taste very different, as Sea Salt will have trace minerals and even biological elements ...


5

There's no single answer, as there's a few considerations here: Was it ground meat, or a larger chunk? How far cooked was it already? How far over-salted is it? Is it being cooked in some sort of sauce or other liquid? Depending on the answer to those: If it's not over-salted by much ... serve it with a sauce that hasn't been salted, serve it on top of ...


4

Mercury builds up in tuna to significant levels thanks to them eating thousands of critters that in turn eat thousands of critters with tiny little bits of mercury, and it all adding up. It's not about mercury levels in the ocean, per se. It's also a heavy metal so it's not likely to be simply floating around in the water that is evaporated to retrieve the ...


4

Depending on how much salt is on them, and how it's been applied, you might be able to knock some of it off, and effectively decant it: Place the peanuts into a hard-sided container at least twice the volume of the peanuts that you can seal tightly. Shake the peanuts. A lot. Not too hard, though, as the goal is to knock some of the salt off, not to smash ...


4

Yes! Try to avoid salted butter in cooking and baking. If you must use it you will need to adjust, but I am not sure there is a consistent way to do this. Different brands probably have different salt content.


3

You may need to practice sprinkling salt -- Get a large piece of paper or plastic, that's preferably not white. Sprinkle some salt on it. Try from different heights. You might also try different types of salt (I find coarser salts easier to control) Roll up the paper (or plastic), so you can pour the salt back into a small dish to try again. Once ...


3

I can't read the minds of all the recipe authors, but I do have a couple ideas. I've found it's definitely easy to overdo salt in ice cream. A very small quantity goes a long way. In most cases you don't actually want it to taste salty, you just want a tiny hint that people will only notice as improved flavor. The quantities are small enough that it'll be ...


3

I checked a few German Sources1 and found a range between 7.5g salt per kg cabbage2 and 20g salt per kg cabbage3. So anywhere between one and a generous two teaspoons per kilogram (two pounds) should be fine. But what exactly is the salt doing in your cabbage/sauerkraut? Well, in theory you could leave it out. The bacteria and yeasts necessary for ...


3

Remove all surface salt by quickly rinsing them and thoroughly drying them as fast as possible.


3

I have rinsed salted nuts well in water to remove the excessive salt and then dried in the oven. Since salted nuts are already roasted, they don't "roast again" very well at all (or in general behave like raw peanuts when cooked) but you can certainly rinse to remove excess salt and dry at low temperatures. If you want to just eat them immediately you can ...


3

As stated in the Wikipedia article about the salt, the pink color that sometimes occurs is due to iron oxide: Himalayan salt is predominantly sodium chloride (95-98%), contaminated with 2–3% polyhalite and small amounts of ten other minerals. The pink color is due to the presence of iron oxide. As a source, the article references this page on ...


2

Any salt will work just fine, salt is salt. But salt that has had iodine added (table salt) can result in a brine with a cloudy texture. Some might consider this less aesthetically pleasing. Edit: Further research indicates that while iodine can cause some problems, other impurities can cause further problems: Salt for pickling: For pickling any ...


2

Bring a saucepan of water to the boil, then add the peanuts and a small potato and simmer for half an hour. The salt will travel from the surface of the peanuts into the potato, which you can then discard. Since the peanuts are for peanut butter, boiling them shouldn't affect the final taste, though you can try a lower temperature if you're concerned, or ...


2

Chemically the pits etched in your pot are the absence of the stainless steel material that makes up the pot. In other words the white spots you're seeing are where a small amount of the stainless steel has been removed from the surface of the pot, much like it had been scraped off. So the pits are completely harmless because they're not actually any kind of ...


2

Yes. In fact, many, many people believe (falsely) that adding salt before or during cooking will keep beans hard (a myth addressed in your first link), and most of these people have been cooking perfectly good beans for many years without adding salt until the beans were fully cooked. The cooking time may vary slightly. In some circumstances, the texture ...


2

Before cooking, Remove any packaging and soak in cold water for 4 - 6 hours changing the water once or twice


1

With that level of salt, I think it was more for flavor rather than curing properties. They'll be safe, but they'll probably taste somewhat flat.


1

The "celery" component of the salt is just there for flavor, and shouldn't affect how the dish cooks. Celery has a deeply vegetal flavor that can enhance others in the dish (hence why you see it in many soups, stews, and braises) but there's enough else in this preparation that you probably won't miss it much. I wouldn't try to use regular flour, though. ...


1

Stock solutions and eye droppers work for this. a solution at 25 grams salt in 100 ml water (well within solubility limits) Will give you 0.25 gram salt or about 0.1 gram sodium (salt is 39% sodium). Every standard eye dropper I've ever tested yielded remarkably close to 1 ml per squeeze. A teaspoon of the liquid would deliver about 0.5 gram sodium, while a ...


1

No, I do not cook my brined chicken with added salt. I always brine chicken overnight with maybe a bit more salt than is standard. The next day, I rinse and soak it briefly in clear water, then cook it without adding salt. It is always salty enough from the brine and very few people eating at my table ever add salt. From my taste buds, I believe chicken ...


1

I use a square cambro container filled with product. Then insert another cambro container on top filled with water or other weights. This keeps your product submerged in brine or weighted down.


1

My mom has a glass top stove...hate it! I use a cooling rack over the burner when I'm trying to not burn a simmering chili. That should work for you.


1

What has been said to you in the answer and comments are all correct. Let me add my 44 years of experience to you which should solve this problem. Make your own crust and use sweet, unsalted butter. You might have added salt instead of sugar in the crust if you made your crust. A very easy mistake. Also as a master cheesecake maker (creamy style baked, ...


1

You could put them in an industrial sifter and use that to knock the salt off and separate the peanuts from the salt in one step, but that's probably overkill unless you have a lot of nuts. Instead knock the salt off first, either with the shaking method that Joe mentioned or by placing the nuts between two sheets of clean fabric or clean, food safe paper ...



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