Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

This is what America's Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has to say about it: Sometimes baked potatoes can use a flavor boost. And instead of light and fluffy, most often they are dense and crumbly. We found that baking the potatoes on a bed of salt remedied these problems. Moisture that escaped the potatoes during baking was trapped in the enclosed pan, ...


10

(1) Taste. When you salt your eggs DOES affect taste because it affects the way your tongue comes into contact with the salt. If you salt your eggs before or during cooking, some of all of the salt dissolves in the water that is in the eggs (raw eggs, overall, are roughly 75% water) and is dispersed over the surface of your eggs while they cook. When you ...


9

No, it won't help you at all. Your vegetables aren't being eaten by bacteria or similar (and this is a good thing, foods which are rendered unsafe by bacteria shouldn't be kept more than 4 hours at room temperature). They are simply wilting. There is no way to stop the wilting process. It is the plant cells dying off and stopping being able to "take care ...


9

There are many roasting recipes that use a bed or even a dome of salt. This has three effects that I am aware of- 1- It salts the food obviously. This isn't necessarily a reason all by itself. As you noticed salt is just as easily added later. 2- It keeps the food off the pan. In the case of fish this can make for easier service. 3- The salt becomes part ...


9

I agree with @rumtscho that you should not need to salt after brining. However, I totally disagree with the accepted answer. There are simply too many reputable sources that say otherwise, not to mention my own experience. First, please see the accepted answer to this question which is from Cook's Illustrated. Secondly, this article from Stella ...


8

No! A cup of salt is an enormous amount and would be dangerous for anyone who ate it, although they are unlikely to be able to swallow it in the first place as it would taste awful. Preserving vegetables can be done with or without preservative agents like sugar, salt, and acid but you won't be able to use your bread machine's jam making function. I would ...


8

Because as you are cooking your soup, water in your soup is evaporating away as steam. You might salt a soup perfectly halfway through, but after evaporation, your now thicker soup is too salty. When adding salt, wait until the end of the cooking process, as soups will reduce and concentrate the flavors as the liquid evaporates. [ Source: ...


7

You are correct in that salt fish are very salty. Where we live salt herrings are a tradition. The way to remove the saltiness is to soak them, changing the water every few hours. The trick here to really getting the saltiness out is to split the back. (The belly should already be split.) This is really important. I once had someone cook them for my ...


7

Food grade salt (Sodium Chloride) in most parts of the world is evaporated from sea water. It generally does not have any detectable mercury, though it does have many other trace elements, some of which are normal dietary minerals Mined salt (rock salt) is generally used for industrial purposes and de-icing, it contains "dirt", but generally not mercury. In ...


6

The simple answer is: people can taste (and smell, when the substance in question has a smell) substances in very low concentrations. A pinch of salt is not a small amount at all, it is a sufficient amount to be tasted.


5

Add more potatoes--they absorb the salt. As would rice or pasta.


5

No, salting or spraying alcohol on your vegetables will not help keep them fresh at all, in fact salting them would probably have the opposite effect. You are probably connecting the fact that salt is used as a preservative with keeping food fresh, but these are 2 different concepts. Keeping things fresh involves trying to keep a plant metabolizing as long ...


5

You can almost always add salt to a dish but you cannot take it out, so it makes sense to add salt at the end of the cooking process unless: the salt needs time to penetrate the ingredients. Potatoes are a good example of this, when I make potatoes for a potato salad for example I add salt at the beginning so that the flavor gets into the them the salt ...


5

Minerals, naturally found in salt whether it's mined or evaporated; and believe it or not, water. Infosa In the US, the FDA requires that salt must not contain more than 2.5% minerals other than NaCl and still call itself salt. That 2.5% does not include water. HowStuffWorks Your numbers for sodium content seem a bit low, but not extremely so, especially for ...


5

It's not just saltiness, but various taste sensitivities that are impacted by pepper. Basically, piperine (the component in black pepper which causes its pungency) and capsaicin (the "hot" chemical in hot peppers) cause mild irritation and inflammation in the mouth when consumed. That inflammation leads to additional sensitivity of taste receptors. ...


5

Salt mixed into hamburger results in patties that have the consistency of sausage instead of a good burger. Brining is totally unnecessary for ground meat. It is a mechanism for conveying flavor into meat, helping reduce moisture loss, and increasing the illusion of tenderness. None of these are necessary with ground meat because it is ground! It will ...


4

I typically use kosher salt. You could use sea salt as well. It is not necessary to use canning salt.


4

If you stay with the same ratio of salt (and any other ingredients) to water that you normally use, you should achieve the same results. As you normally use a 5% solution it shouldn't matter how many chickens or how much water if you stay with the 5% solution. The only thing that the weight of the chickens will factor into is the amount of brining time ...


4

So let's see what would happen: salting Assuming you mean brining, not too much. The meat would absorb some of the liquid, that would be unwanted in step 2. If you mean a dry rub with salt, the outer layer of the meat would dry out a bit. Not nice for a lean chop. making confitSlow simmering in fat would most likely render the lean meat of the chops ...


4

Mercury builds up in tuna to significant levels thanks to them eating thousands of critters that in turn eat thousands of critters with tiny little bits of mercury, and it all adding up. It's not about mercury levels in the ocean, per se. It's also a heavy metal so it's not likely to be simply floating around in the water that is evaporated to retrieve the ...


4

Depending on how much salt is on them, and how it's been applied, you might be able to knock some of it off, and effectively decant it: Place the peanuts into a hard-sided container at least twice the volume of the peanuts that you can seal tightly. Shake the peanuts. A lot. Not too hard, though, as the goal is to knock some of the salt off, not to smash ...


4

Yes! Try to avoid salted butter in cooking and baking. If you must use it you will need to adjust, but I am not sure there is a consistent way to do this. Different brands probably have different salt content.


3

A cursory internet and pubmed search did not yield any historical/traditional/cultural food-ties to this quaternary ammonium salt compound for me. Personally, I would not feel comfortable using this in a home setting because it can be toxic in small quantities. To my knowledge, ammoniac is used in agriculture (with pesticides and as an industrial ...


3

A wonderful classic dish from Europe starts with salt cod. You soak it for 24 hours with many changes of water, just in a bowl in the fridge, then cook it in milk until it softens. Then you make a mash from the cooked cod, some potatoes, and cloves of garlic that you gently cook in olive oil. Finally whip the olive oil into the mashed up fish/potato/garlic ...


3

I did an online search for the first 10 sushi rice recipes with distinct ingredient proportions and came up with the following ratio (by weight): 1:0.08:0.16:0.02 (Raw Rice:Sugar:Vinegar:Salt) With cooked rice, 1:0.03:0.06:0.01 (Cooked Rice:Sugar:Vinegar:Salt) Or, if you prefer: For 1300g / ~6 cups Sushi Rice 400g or 2 cups of raw sushi ...


3

I have rinsed salted nuts well in water to remove the excessive salt and then dried in the oven. Since salted nuts are already roasted, they don't "roast again" very well at all (or in general behave like raw peanuts when cooked) but you can certainly rinse to remove excess salt and dry at low temperatures. If you want to just eat them immediately you can ...


3

Remove all surface salt by quickly rinsing them and thoroughly drying them as fast as possible.


2

Soak at least overnight. In addition to that, consider a sweet glaze like apricot, or an acidic one like one that includes cider vinegar. Best yet might be all three, an overnight soak (change the water a few times) and a sweet, acidic glaze. If you still find it too salty, go ahead and try boiling briefly in fresh water (blanching) after soaking, and then ...


2

Lime juice, tamarind paste, vinegars, mango powder, sour yogarts are what I use with a little as possible of table salt.


2

From a practical standpoint, you won't be able to get a full cup of salt to dissolve into a "jam". The solubility of sodium chloride (table salt) is much lower than that of sucrose (sugar) and it doesn't change much with additional heat. So while you can add a (relatively) huge amount of sugar, get it to dissolve, and be left with a stable and pleasantly ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible