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14

Ignore the purists. If it's got cheese in it, and you're grilling it, it's grilled cheese. The problem is this: your cold ingredients are keeping the cheese from properly melting through. The cheese is what binds the whole thing together. If there is not enough cheese, or if the cheese hasn't transitioned completely to gooey deliciousness, the sandwich is ...


13

No. Cream cheese will simply go runny if you melt it. It is in no way a substitute for a hard cheese.


12

Maybe! There's one big potential issue: panini presses are hinged differently. There's a bit of variation exactly how, but the effect is that the entire top can lift up, so that it can press down flat on whatever you stick in there. Waffle irons are just designed to be filled, so they hinge at the back. If your sandwich is much smaller than the waffle iron, ...


12

Yes, it can change the taste quite significantly. Here's an easy experiment that you can do: Make a sandwich, but spread mustard on only one of the pieces of bread. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side up. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side down. Mouth feel is affected as well, but not quite as dramatically.


9

Gruyere is DELICIOUS. It melts without getting too gooey or soupy, and it is the traditional cheese component of a Croque Monsieur (if you're into that ham thing...). You could actually probably use any of the cheeses in that "variations" list, but I love Gruyere so that's my recommendation. It's widely available but tends to be kind of pricey here in the ...


9

The shooter's sandwich you linked involves cooked mushrooms and fried steaks. In contemporary food safety practice, this is not shelf-stable at all. It can be held 3-5 days in the fridge, or up to 2 hours at room temperature. I can imagine that hunters did take it on longer trips historically. They lived in a time when mild food poisoning (symptoms limited ...


9

Typically with these sandwiches you have some cheese inside along with some other ingredients such as tomatoes that get quite hot (325° F sometimes). From what I've seen, if you have a square only shape, you don't necessarily get a good seal, plus you get a massive pocket of hot lava. The fat from the cheese or butter concentrates in the center, soaks and ...


8

The rate of slime of a piece of food has to do with amount of surface area it has. At each point a food's surface is an entry point for bacteria. Since there is always bacteria on any cutting utensil or machine every cut piece of meat has been seeded with a bacteria culture. Although it might not kill you or make you visibly sick, the slime is coming from ...


8

As far as I know, there are no official categories of sandwiches, although there are considerable regional differences in what is considered a "prototypical" sandwich across the world (and some cultures have multiple common sandwiches). A traditional American sub is very different from a German Käsebrot. So, I can't point you to a type of sandwich and tell ...


8

Cream cheese sandwiches are tasty, when prepared properly, but you cannot grill them the way you grill grilled (hard) cheese. But you don't need it to melt - it's already nice and malleable, and has the oil in a soft enough state that it hits your tastebuds properly. Some good options for cream cheese sandwiches (or any similar soft cheese, really): ...


7

You've got a few things to consider -- cost of the ingredients shrinkage energy costs time costs wastage So, in our decision making tree, we have to consider the real costs of each option. Say for instance that whole roasts are on sale, so the cost of a roast is 1/2 the cost of buying the deli meat. The roast is going to lose weight as it cooks ... ...


7

My guess is that you don't have real cheese in your sandwich. I've seen this before with things called cheese that were really types of American cheese. It happened when then product was exposed to moisture that it seemed to absorb, which then caused it to turn soggy and glue-like. If you'd have said that you had tomato in your sandwich, I'd have been sure ...


7

There is no single cut of meat that is universally used in Philadelphia. Top round is common, and it may actually be the most traditional given the sandwich's Italian origins (top round is what is used in braciole and Italian beef sandwiches). It is becoming more and more common to use rib-eye, though, which is what is used in some of the most popular ...


7

There is really no advantage or disadvantage to using a sandwich press. This is more a choice of preference from person to person. For me, a sandwich press is preferable as it toast the bread on both sides simultaneously, so you get an even toast on both sides, and it also presses the sandwich together so that it does not fall apart. A sandwich press also ...


6

What if you grate the cheese and mix the (chopped) bacon and onions into it before putting it on the bread? Then you would have melted cheese with little pockets of deliciousness.


6

I usually toast most of my sandwiches (or the grilled cheese kind) for hikes and picnics. My general rules are: no filling that releases water (fresh tomato, for example) and wrap in paper (tissue or napkin) and then plastic or foil (or a cooler/plastic container). Keep in the fridge until needed or when packing your bag. The paper will prevent most of the ...


6

I'm not sure if this counts as 'natural' - but you can transform nearly any cheese into a melting cheese transform nearly any cheese (a better version!) into a melting cheese. Wondra flour and a little cream go in with your crumbled/shredded cheese into the steamer and steam till its gooey - it forms a stable emulsion. Then you can pour and cool it into ...


6

I would suggest opening the sandwich so the filling is facing up, removing any toppings that you would prefer to remain cold, and sticking it in an oven or toaster oven for a bit. That gets the heat to the center of the sandwich immediately, though you'll want low heat (maybe 250F?) and not to heat it very long or the bread will get too toasted. It won't ...


5

I agree with everything Reven said. One additional note, though: make sure that the toast is completely cooled before wrapping the sandwhich up. Otherwise the bread is still releasing steam, which could soften the bread.


5

Don't know what the flavor profile of the shredded beef, but a nice flavorful hummus (Sabra is my favorite brand) is one of my favorite alternates to mayonnaise in beef sandwiches. Sounds unusual, but it's a great textural and flavor compliment.


5

Firstly - shop-bought "packet" bread will keep for several days because it contains a lot of preservatives. In his excellent book Bread Matters, Andrew Whitley claims that home-made sourdough breads with very long rises have better keeping properties than home-made bread made with baker's yeast and short rises. This, he claims, is because the sourdough ...


5

The truth is, there really is no good way to reheat such sandwiches. The bread will have gotten soggy while the sandwich was in the refrigerator, and the densest part (which requires the most energy to get hot) is on the inside. The option which is probably the least poor is to use the microwave, as more of the energy will be transmitted to the filling ...


4

To some extent, this is a question to which the answers are necessarily quite subjective. However, as a general guideline, I would suggest that you look at the bread as just another ingredient in the dish -- not as somehow distinct from the filling choices. Like any other ingredient pairing, you can evaluate the characteristics and choose things to ...


4

I know of three ways for a recipe to become standardized, and I doubt that any of them applies to your sub. The first one is: someone creates a recipe and is well-known enough for people to imitate him. Then it gets called the name he gave it originally. Example: Sachertorte. There is just one recipe for it, created by Franz Sacher, and any deviations are ...


4

I admit, this doesn't exactly answer your question, but to expand on slim's suggestion for flatbreads -- if you're willing to give up fridge space for this, and have a little bit of time & fuel each day for cooking, I'd recommend the recipes in the various Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day series of books. You make up the dough, let it proof, then ...


4

That sounds... unpleasant. Cream cheese will melt, yes, but it won't melt in the same way as cheddar. It has more moisture and a very different structure. Where cheddar will retain some structure and a "stretchy" texture, cream cheese will just flow more freely. Layered between bread, it would probably just squirt out of the sides of the sandwich when you ...


4

Wrap the sandwich in foil before baking so the moisture stays in the bread. That will prevent it crisping up.


4

The bread gets crispy and "stiff" because it dries up completely. A good toaster should toast a slice of bread quickly so that the exterior is toasted and the interior barely hot; a bad toaster will not be warm enough and will dry up the slice of bread. Same thing when you do an oven baked sandwich, it should be done on high heat so that the bread toasts ...


3

It's an American sandwich, not actually Italian, and as such is subject to the whims of a thousand urban sandwich shop entrepreneurs. The only variations I know of from your description are to drop the onion, add pepperoncini peppers, or to drop the prosciutto (pricy) in favor of cheaper lunch meats (mortadella, bologna, or even turkey).


3

No matter what cheese you end up using (cheddar with a little mustard is my favorite), if it is semi-hard like cheddar or provolone, it will melt more evenly if it is grated.



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