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11

Yes, it can change the taste quite significantly. Here's an easy experiment that you can do: Make a sandwich, but spread mustard on only one of the pieces of bread. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side up. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side down. Mouth feel is affected as well, but not quite as dramatically.


7

As far as I know, there are no official categories of sandwiches, although there are considerable regional differences in what is considered a "prototypical" sandwich across the world (and some cultures have multiple common sandwiches). A traditional American sub is very different from a German Käsebrot. So, I can't point you to a type of sandwich and tell ...


5

I would suggest opening the sandwich so the filling is facing up, removing any toppings that you would prefer to remain cold, and sticking it in an oven or toaster oven for a bit. That gets the heat to the center of the sandwich immediately, though you'll want low heat (maybe 250F?) and not to heat it very long or the bread will get too toasted. It won't ...


5

The truth is, there really is no good way to reheat such sandwiches. The bread will have gotten soggy while the sandwich was in the refrigerator, and the densest part (which requires the most energy to get hot) is on the inside. The option which is probably the least poor is to use the microwave, as more of the energy will be transmitted to the filling ...


3

Absolutely! I have had great results with tomatoes directly against the cheese. I can't quite put my finger on why, but no matter where else I've tried putting the tomato slice it just isn't quite as excellent as right up against the cheese (the cheese being right up against the bread in this example (separated only by your favorite choice of lipid =) )) ...


3

If you have a sandwich in which the entire sandwich should be heated, there are ways of doing it that I would consider 'least bad' (not necessarily 'best'). I'd heat things up differently based on the bread. If it's currently hard and/or dry : take a brown paper bag that will fit the sandwich, place the sandwich inside, and tightly seal the bag (fold it ...


3

The best way is to take the sub apart. Scrape any left over loose condiments (i.e. Mayo, ketchup, mustard, etc.) off of the bread. Turn your toaster oven on to about 250°. Put your bread in it while it's heating up. Then on a separate plate, heat up your sub guts (cheesesteak, fish, etc) for about 1.5 minutes in the microwave. Check your bread to see where ...


2

take the top off the sub, put the sub on some aluminum foil, turn your oven on broil, put your sub in the oven for like 3 minutes (just stay close by, you'll smell when it's done depending on how much stuff is on your sub), remove sub from oven, reconstruct, devour.


1

I have a small waffle maker and I easily made a "waffle" toasted sandwich using two buttered pieces and bread, chopped tomatoes, cilantro and slice of mozzarella cheese. It turned out great. I slowly closed the lid and gently pressed until the bread was toasty and done. Had to wait a couple minutes for the cheese to cool but it was crunchy and yummy. I think ...


1

The best way I have found and used is put the items in one tin plate put in a small amount of water, cover it with another tin plate, put into an oven or toaster oven, heat it up and, Wa La it is like from your original purchase (All Most) You have Restored it !!



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