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5

Wrap the sandwich in foil before baking so the moisture stays in the bread. That will prevent it crisping up.


4

The bread gets crispy and "stiff" because it dries up completely. A good toaster should toast a slice of bread quickly so that the exterior is toasted and the interior barely hot; a bad toaster will not be warm enough and will dry up the slice of bread. Same thing when you do an oven baked sandwich, it should be done on high heat so that the bread toasts ...


4

My home pickled beans get spicy because there's a dried red pepper or two in the jar, along with a dill head and some garlic cloves. The beans are very nice in a sandwich. But you could pickle-and-spice anything at all and use it to jazz up the sandwich. The texture is that of a soft vegetable. Also, look into mustard greens and their relatives. They look ...


4

For this specific requirement I eat sliced cherry peppers in my sandwiches. While they are not the length that you could cut cucumbers, I have little problem keeping them in the sandwich. I have about as much trouble keeping tomatoes in the sandwich, and I rarely have to replace them.


3

Watercress, sorrel, nasturtium leaves (or Nasturtium flowers, but the leaves will work better in a sandwich.) All are spicy, but it's not "hot pepper flavor." You could pickle some peppery (spiced up) cucumber slices - slice them and marinate with hot peppers in the refrigerator (assuming you don't want to go to the bother of canning them, "refrigerator ...


3

Deseeding the pepper thoroughly and slicing it into millimeter thick rings should make it stay put. You could sprinkle the rings on like a green herb.


3

As Jefromi already mentioned in a comment, the sandwich bread common in the Western part of the world is soft and often sweet, ready to eat. When you search online for 'indian sandwich bread' you will only get images of roasted bread with various fillings. I think the bread you refer to is in a half baked form, which you can find in supermarkets here ...


2

I think it may often just be fat/protein slime. Unfortunately, that's going to be hard to distinguish safe fat/protein slime from bad bacterial slime, so this is probably yet another time where you'll have to use your best judgment. If it's well before the sell-by date and has been handled properly, it shouldn't have dangerous spoilage. There should ...


2

For meatball parm I do this: Cut sandwich filling lengthwise down the center, trying not to cut through bottom bread. Lay sandwich on baking sheet open, so heat can get at the cut center Bake at 425 F for about 5-10 minutes. This method preserves the bread's crispy texture (microwaves turn bread soggy -- great for softening stale bread in a pinch though) ...


2

As long as the tonkatsu is cooked and then cooled appropriately (ie relatively quickly), then stored at appropriate temperatures (ie refrigerated) until consumption, you should be fine. The length of your journey to work will be the main factor - you need to keep the food cool enough, so a cool bag with ice blocks may be in order. Then you need to make sure ...


2

Oooh, I hate that. If you put butter on the bread to create a buffer layer between the peanut butter and the bread it may help. Also, be sure to seal the bread from the air to retard the process of getting stale. The other main option is to keep the peanut butter in a separate container and spread it before eating.


2

What I did to solve my problem was I made a thick cheese sauce with some of the pepperjack/sharp cheddar (grated some of it, coated in corn starch, melted in a little bit of milk), and mixed that into the meat mix, just enough cheese sauce to bind it, just enough to make the meat start sticking together (and I reduced amount of sliced cheese on top and ...


2

One way to make your sandwich spicy would be kimchi, or if you have the time, you can make your own spicy pickled cabbage in your refrigerator, as explained in this recipe for hasperat.


1

Assuming that you don't mind the bottom of your smaller pan getting dirty, you could put the sandwich in a heated larger pan and place the pre-heated smaller pan on top. According to your question, you've got this this in own mental experiment. The next step would just require you to borrow from mechanical engineering and some cheap root vegetables. ...


1

You can try some thinly sliced horseradish. It'll have a nice kick and slight crunch.


1

Take a Mozzarella cheese ball and break apart about 2 inch sections. Take enough that you think is going to be enough for how much meat you would like for your sandwich. Put the ingredients of meat and cheese together in a food processor. Grind together and then cook or sear the patties. The cheese should melt well enough to hold all of the meat with it, and ...


1

Toast your sandwich then quickly place in freezer in foil only this will take any moisture out and give you the perfect sandwich



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