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7

The 4th version you gave is optimal from a chemistry standpoint; the process of using heat to melt a soft fat and dissolve a powder into a liquid by stirring is going to be at it's most efficient when the ingredients can fully interact with each other without all that pasta in the way. It seems the main issue at hand here is the 10-15 minute wait for ...


6

There's no rule that you have to drink your wine 24 hours after un-corking it, in fact some wines can taste better after 24 hours. 3 or 4 days is fine in many cases, and some wines are still drinkable a week after opening. This can be extended by refrigerating your wine after opening, white or red, you can get 2 weeks out of a bottle of wine if it's stored ...


6

Most of the cooling from ice comes from the melting anyway. That's why ice makers, which don't freeze as cold as freezers, are still useful. It takes 334J/g to turn ice at 0C into water at 0C, but only 2.03J/g to warm ice by 1C. So to halve the amount of ice you use to get the same cooling you'd need to freeze it to around -150C. If you're going to do that ...


5

Some things I can see: 1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce You want to use good canned whole peeled tomatoes. Put them in a bowl, get your hands in there, and crush them very finely. But you have to let that tartness cook out a bit. 1 teaspoon sugar Try very finely grating 3/4 cup (about one) peeled carrot instead of using sugar. The sugar isn't doing ...


3

I use this copycat recipe to make it at home. Depending on who's coming for dinner, I change up the herbs and the type of vinegar I use, and I usually use half black pepper and half white pepper. Other than that, just use it as is.


2

Carrots and onions have different cooking times, so no, you can't throw them together. What I would do is cut the carrots as small as the onions (just for aesthetic purposes), start stewing the carrots in a closed pot first and season them as you like, and when they're nearly done, add the onions and caramelise them normally while they're stewing together ...


2

Based on your description, it looks like you've made the common error of assuming that equal volume is equal weight. Butter is more dense than flour so the same volume does not equal the same weight... you must convert the 1/4 cup for each product using a trustworthy site. Here's one that looks OK and includes both butter and flour. As you can see, 1/4 ...


2

No, you can do something to underthicken it (make a darker roux than the recipe intended by accidentally heating for too long), and you can get lumps in it, but there is no common mistake(1) which can cause too thick a sauce. From your description, it seems like you simply used way too much flour. 120 g to the cup is a pretty common conversion factor for ...


2

Add teaspoon or two of flour to the yogurt before adding to the sauce will greatly reduce the chance of curdling. Also add the yogurt at the end of cooking and keep it no higher than a bare simmer. Adding yogurt slowly helps too. Also use the higher fat yogurt. A dash of cream added before the yogurt goes in will help. Starch and fat reduce the chance of the ...


2

The way to store a small quantity of dry ice for a week without spending a lot of money on a freezer that will actually keep it below sublimation temperature, or having a cylinder of the pressurized liquid and a "dry ice maker attachment" for the cylinder to make some when you need some, is to buy a larger quantity of dry ice and store it in a well-insulated ...


2

Don't freeze ice then. There's a couple of solutions where something with a good amount of heat capasity is popped into a freezer and used to cool things - the generic names for these seem to be drink chillers. They are made of materials like metal or granite which you throw into a fridge. It'll cool, and when added to a drink will absorb heat from it, and ...


1

I haven't had that specific sauce before, but I've had similar sauces (FYI, if you want to buy the sauce without buying the potstickers, you can buy them in small bottles in Asian food stores). I don't know the exact ratios, but you can always start with a ratio of 1:1:1 of soy sauce (Kikkoman would do just fine here), rice vinegar (not shaoxing, that's a ...


1

You do not add fat to sugar when caramelizing it, you add it to the pan dry. Sugar has water suspended in it, and it comes out when heated. The caramel will transfer the heat to the onions just fine - anyone who's ever gotten splattered with hot caramel will attest to that.



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