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8

There is nothing you can add or do to your sauce to remove or mask the burnt taste. Really. Don't even try. Throw it out and start over, being careful not to burn it this time. For some foods, there are various tricks you can try for removing the burnt taste, but they all start with removing the burnt bits. With a sauce where you've already thoroughly ...


8

I'm not sure your exact recipe or method, but you cannot get rid of the burnt taste or smell and you will need to start over with fresh ingredients. You don't need or want to boil the milk at any part of the process, just to heat the milk enough to activate the thickener. In the case of a classic flour roux thickened sauce you start by cooking the roux for ...


5

Weak organic acids such as those found in fruits and vegetables (citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid) don't react with sugars. 1 There is no change in acidity, which you correctly defined as measured by the pH. At the same time, sweet and sour are two tastes which are real antagonists - adding something sweet actually reducess the sourness we perceive, ...


5

From a production standpoint, you might actually be better off asking this question on the gardening site. In general, however, for canning purposes you'll want to select a 'determinate' variety -- they tend to have all of their fruit ripen around the same time, rather than having it be spread out across many weeks. Indeterminate tend to be better for ...


1

San Marzano and Viva Italia make very tasty sauces if you grow your own, and boil down the seed-strained mash using only the ripe fruit. It doesn't take many green ones to make the taste too sharp.



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