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11

The biggest reason your sauce didn't thicken is that you didn't have much of anything at all in the pan that will gelatinize and help trap the water molecules present in the sauce. Starches (flour, cornstarch) will provide some of this, as will a liquid like stock that contains some dissolved collagens. But wine and water by themselves will have very ...


9

Generally lowfat sauces use tricks to get texture and some semblance of flavour. Starches and thickeners give the illusion of richness, while vast quantities of salt somewhat mask the lack of cheese and butter. Anyone with half a palette can tell at first taste though. Make it seldom, but make it properly.


8

Roux Method The advantages of the roux method: It can be prepared in advance The raw flour taste is cooked out when the roux is prepared, so the sauce is ready as soon as it is thickened; this also makes it easier to add more roux to adjust the thickness of the sauce. It actually requires less supervision. You are actually being overly fussy with your ...


8

The advantage can be reduced to one word: taste. A slurry based sauce is not the same thing as a roux based sauce. Milk pudding is not a Bechamel in the same way that a baguette is not a brioche, margarine is not butter, and 'cocoa-containing fat glaze' is not ganache. It has a different taste, and cooks over the generations have preferred the Bechamel ...


7

Know that the traditional Frank's Buffalo Wings Sauce is just Frank's RedHot and melted butter. I'd definitely start there, and tweak with the substitution. The old standard is 1/2 cup (118ml) Frank's RedHot to 1/3 cup (79ml) melted butter. Vinegar is a distinct possibility, to me neither buttermilk nor ketchup make sense. You might find this recipe for ...


7

UPDATE: OK, I made my version of the sauce twice, I learned a little bit from my first attempt, so I'm going to walk you through my second. Although the ingredients in the stir-fry are vastly different (I had some left over chicken and I have a thing for frozen peas), I think the ingredients and technique I'm demonstrating here will work fine for you as ...


6

Yes. Any part of the bottle that is not submersed may not reach the proper temperature for sterilization.


6

There is no way to be certain, but I would blame the margarine. Margarine is not pure fat like an oil, nor a simple fat-water emulsion like butter. It is a rather unstable emulsion, and it uses all kinds of industrial tricks to achieve a smooth, soft, spreadable consistency. It is not just emulsified, it generally contains all kinds of gums too. This is ...


6

The thickening in Bearnaise, as in mayonnaise, is not so much in the ingredients as in the technique. These sauces get their thickness by being emulsified. An emulsion is formed by rapidly mixing, whisking or blending two ingredients that shouldn't mix (oil and liquid). The emulsifier (egg yolk and often mustard in the case of mayo) stabilizes the emulsion ...


6

The first way to boost the cheese flavor in any cheese sauce is by adding salt. In Mac + Cheese, authors Allison Arevalo and Erin Wade give the following tip: If you have added the proper amount of cheese to your mac, but it still doesn't taste “cheesy” enough, chances are the problem is not cheese, but salt. Salt brings out the flavors of all kinds of ...


5

If, when reducing a sauce, you are getting splashing outside the pot, your pot may be too small for the application. Use a larger pot: a wider base will allow more surface area for evaporation, and higher sides will make it harder for the content to get out. You can also purchase a splatter guard, which is like a flat sieve or mesh that you can place over ...


5

To cook a sauce for a long time, particularly without a lid, concentrates the flavor of the sauce as the water evaporates. That's also called reduction. Yes, sauces that are cooked that way need to be stirred frequently to avoid allowing them to stick to the bottom of the pan. Sticking is bad enough, but it leads to burning, which is worse. In meat sauces ...


4

It is most probably crema di balsamico, a quite popular condiment, even often only used for decorative purposes. It can both be used with savory dishes, but also with sweet dishes, as in e.g. ice cream or gelato. Traditionally, crema di balsamico is made by reducing grape juice and optionally wine to the point where the sugar in the grape juice starts to ...


4

Tell your friend to buy around a 450g jar of passata. This is finely crushed, sieved tomatoes. It comes plain, or most supermarkets carry versions with onions, basil etc. Tomato puree is an entirely different thing and I wouldn't go down that route. There are also various pre-made tomato sauce jars available from the likes of brands like Dolmio that have ...


4

You don't actually have to refrigerate ketchup. Once it's opened it's good for a month or so with no appreciable change. After that the flavour and colour starts to degrade, but it's still safe to eat. Worcestershire sauce is fermented for more than a year before it's bottled, so it will change at a much slower rate than an acidic, but unfermented sauce ...


4

Throw out the low-fat sauce. Make alfredo. Alfredo is a very, very simple sauce at its heart. Most recipes consist essentially only of two or three ingredients such as cream, butter, and parmesan, perhaps with some garlic or pepper. So if you don't have low-fat restrictions, don't use a low fat version as a base. Just make the sauce from your recipe ...


4

There are a number or styles of soy sauces used in Japanese cuisine. Saishikomi shoyu is sometimes described as sweet compared to regular Koikuchi shoyu. Additionally there are soy-based sauces available in the US that have added ingredients such as corn syrup or MSG to enhance specific flavors. Kikkoman makes an "enhanced" soy sauce that they call ...


4

It's normal for some separation to occur, especially based on the makeup/composition of the sauce is. If it's a regular long-cooked vinegar and water hot sauce, then there would be very little separation that would occur. If it's a vinegar and oil based hot sauce, then there would be quite a lot of separation. If it's a vinegar based hot sauce, but made ...


4

Reducing a mixture is simply boiling out water present in the solution. Adding a starch (either cornstarch or other flours) doesn't remove that water but instead causes the starch to expand and "trap" some of the water. Cornstarch in particular doesn't work especially well when there isn't enough moisture in the base mixture, or if there's too much fat or ...


4

When reducing a sauce, keep in mind that the flavors you add are going to be intensified. Wine reduces very well, meaning that its flavor absolutely becomes stronger the more it is reduced. The water in liquids evaporate, that's what reduction is all about. Fats don't evaporate. If you start a sauce with 1 part fat to 3 parts liquid and reduce it 2 parts, ...


4

That advice isn't "wrong" and millions of people keep keep fish sauce in a cabinet for decades. Regarding safety, it's generally OK to store fish sauce at room temperature for years, but that isn't recommended by government worrywarts for best quality. Still Tasty. Pathogens run in fear faced with this stuff, but it can (rarely) develop "offness". It is ...


4

Citric acid and sodium hexametaphosphate are often used in processed cheese as emulsifier. These kinds of salts improve the protein's swelling capacity and emulsification and thus inhibits the leakage of water or fat from the product (forms metal complexes). Some salts are also acid buffers. 1 In this wikipedia article (in German, but chemical names are ...


4

Italy is very protective of its food heritage and there are many examples of recipes being officially codified by various authorities, e.g, the EU designation, Traditional Speciality Guaranteed, was applied to pizza margherita in 2009 and strictly mandates the ingredients that may be used. The recipe for Ragu alla Bolognese doesn't have the weight of the ...


4

Slice bean in half. Use knife blade to scrape seeds out of bean. Scrape seeds from blade into milk as you are heating. Added bonus: toss scraped vanilla pods into a bowl of sugar to create vanilla sugar. Best flavor release of vanilla into a fat-based mixture is achieved during heating.


4

Mint likes oil. And it likes water. And it likes alcohol. Like most complex flavors, mint is complicated. The greener, vegetal notes are going to be from compounds like chlorophyll, and will be alcohol and very weakly water soluble. The astringent, sharper notes are going to from compounds like menthol, which are oil soluble. In general, the faster ...


3

A couple of ideas you might try: using half cilantro and half parsley, and adding some very finely minced raw onion. I also sometimes add a tablespoon or so of drained capers. Some people also add a modest amount of fresh oregano leaves for their resinous punch.


3

What I would suggest is rather than adding a syrup, to take some of your cooked beans, cook them a bit more, then liquify them in a blender. This should give you a thick sauce that tastes like the beans, therefore compliments them perfectly. You can then thicken them very slightly if the consistency is still too runny, be sparing with the flour though. In ...


3

Baked beans have a syrupy texture largely due to... syrup. They are cooked with a lot of sugar, so the liquid becomes a syrup. You could try draining off most of the water from your beans after cooking them, add your seasonings, tomatoes of some form (canned?), and sugar. Simmer that until the liquid is reduced and thickened. Another common way to get a ...


3

I totally agree with @SAJ4SAJ his answer, but I would like to add that I've heard about people getting rid of the lumps of flour with an immersion blender. However, I did not do this myself. But if I ever try it, I'll update this answer. This is not always a solution (same limits as other answers), you will destroy pieces in your sauce you do desire.


3

Once this has happened, about the only practical way to remove them is with a strainer. Of course that will remove anything else in the sauce like onions as well. In the future, you can use better ways to thicken your sauce. See some ideas in this question, which while phrased for mushroom sauce, has a very general answer: How can I thicken my mushroom ...



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