Hot answers tagged

27

What we perceive as "flavor" often comes from a lot of aromatic and volatile components that we smell. We smell them because they are volatile, which means that they tend to evaporate off food (if they are small molecules) or tend to be carried off of food (for larger molecules). Aside from the basic sweet, sour, bitter, salt, and umami notes, the rest of ...


24

How about using orange zest instead of the juice? That way you'll get a lot of the aroma and flavor we think of as "orange" without really changing the sweetness or acidity.


19

The whole thing should've been done with the lid off. Any time you're reducing a sauce, you want the steam (moisture) to escape. As for 'how thick', the standard test is 'coats the back of a spoon'. If you stir with a spoon, you should be able to lift the spoon out vertically, and the sauce doesn't immediately drip off of it. This test also lets you ...


19

There's a great deal of variation in the quality of the pre-made stocks you get from different sources, so there's no clear-cut answer. Here's the types you might find: Stock cubes: these are dehydrated stock, or sometimes just chemicals meant to taste like it. It's the lowest quality option. There's a lot of variation here, I've found some brands (knorr ...


16

What you are looking for is pretty common and can be bought in most markets in the kitchen section. Or ordered online by search "olive oil bottles". They look like this:


14

I did a cheap kitchen hack by reusing an empty Sriracha bottle after cleaning and drying it up for my oil drops. Here is how the bottle looks: And it is perfect for dropping oil. The nozzle also lets me increase or decrease the diameter of the oil drop. If you don't happen to like this sauce, try it with some Asian food. You'll love it mostly!!!


12

Plastic squeeze bottles come in a variety of sizes, offer a bit more control and are very inexpensive. Just make sure to get one that is food grade.


11

Most of the popular ingredients for BBQ sauce (vinegar/ketchup/sugar etc.) tend not to mix very well together. I know whenever I've made BBQ sauce, placing all of the ingredients into a pan together they tend to separate and are difficult to combine. Heating up the ingredients, however, causes them to combine better, and after a short time cooking they will ...


10

You might try zesting the orange, reducing the juice a bit, and then adding the zest to the syrup and then cooking it down a bit more. You may or may not wish to strain it after letting the zest cook for a minute or so. If you do this, take care. I believe cooking it too long will make the zest overly bitter. Alternatively, you could use frozen orange ...


9

All excellent information, but can I answer bluntly: none of them come even CLOSE to the real thing. Once you use fresh stock, you will never, ever go back. Really. Making stock is easy, cheap, and as said above, unattended time. Stock forms the base of the kitchen, once you have it, you will notice the taste of everything you make improve so much. Get some ...


9

First of all, people indeed often add some seasoning in the beginning, but are usually careful with the amount, especially with salt. Flavor-wise, you could add it at the end, after the reduction and be fine. However, salt can also affect the process of cooking. For instance, it can draw moisture out of some vegetables when frying them first, meaning that ...


8

Marinara is a style / kind of a sauce that originated in Napoli usually made with tomatoes, garlic, herbs, and onions. A spaghetti sauce only says where to sauce is used (obviously on spaghetti) but doesn't say anything about what the sauce is exactly like. There are many dishes which are basically spaghetti + sauce: Spaghetti alla marinara – which ...


8

I'm not sure your exact recipe or method, but you cannot get rid of the burnt taste or smell and you will need to start over with fresh ingredients. You don't need or want to boil the milk at any part of the process, just to heat the milk enough to activate the thickener. In the case of a classic flour roux thickened sauce you start by cooking the roux for ...


8

There is nothing you can add or do to your sauce to remove or mask the burnt taste. Really. Don't even try. Throw it out and start over, being careful not to burn it this time. For some foods, there are various tricks you can try for removing the burnt taste, but they all start with removing the burnt bits. With a sauce where you've already thoroughly ...


7

It doesn't do anything, it's your second suggestion. The feeling of "right/wrong" and "like/dislike" is highly correlated with familiarity. This is proven not only by psychometry, but even physiologically, with fMRI scans. People like most whatever they are familiar with, up to the point that unfamiliar things seem wrong. This applies not only to bay ...


7

Will it lose flavor compared to a sauce not reduced so much? Probably not, but it may taste different, it may taste more roasted or caramelized.


7

There are some sauce recipes where you need to thicken them to the point where they'd stay on whatever it is you're grilling. If you didn't cook them down, they'd have the consistency of a marinade, and just drip off. Sometimes you need to evaporate out some of the moisture, but other times you're actually creating chemical changes ... cooking sugar to a ...


7

You have a couple of solutions: Make it thicker with agar agar instead of starch Use something like jam or marmalade The latter might be to close of the sugary paste you dislike. However agar agar contrary to starch has a really wide range of thickening. You can just make things from a tiny bit thicker than water to jelly. More over the boiling needed ...


7

The 4th version you gave is optimal from a chemistry standpoint; the process of using heat to melt a soft fat and dissolve a powder into a liquid by stirring is going to be at it's most efficient when the ingredients can fully interact with each other without all that pasta in the way. It seems the main issue at hand here is the 10-15 minute wait for ...


6

The original Valencian allioli and Maltese aljoli don't have egg yolk in its receipe. Egg yolk makes emulsification easier but it isn't necessary. Garlic itself is already an emulsifier. Allioli is made by pounding garlic with olive oil and salt in a mortar until smooth. The oil should be added little by little -- otherwise the emulsion breaks.


6

Fresh tomatoes are insanely watery, so you're starting at a pretty big disadvantage here. Trying to fix it with a thickening agent alone might not be the best plan. That said, if you want a short answer: use tomato paste, whether homemade or storebought. It'll thicken and improve the flavor. Watery tomato sauce usually has watery flavor, not just watery ...


6

I think you probably used too much flour for the amount of liquid in your gravy — instead of gravy, you made pudding. You might be able to thin it down by whisking in some additional liquid such as milk or water before reheating it. However, next time use half (or even less) percentage of flour to liquid, and you'll have better results.


6

No. Canned food (when done correctly) is preserved properly and is safe to consume without further cooking. Imagine that it's jam or oil packed sun dried tomatoes or canned tuna... something similar that's jarred or canned and then never (or only sometimes) cooked before consuming. There's nothing unsafe about it. If it was unsafe, no one would can foods. ...


6

There's no rule that you have to drink your wine 24 hours after un-corking it, in fact some wines can taste better after 24 hours. 3 or 4 days is fine in many cases, and some wines are still drinkable a week after opening. This can be extended by refrigerating your wine after opening, white or red, you can get 2 weeks out of a bottle of wine if it's stored ...


6

Most of the cooling from ice comes from the melting anyway. That's why ice makers, which don't freeze as cold as freezers, are still useful. It takes 334J/g to turn ice at 0C into water at 0C, but only 2.03J/g to warm ice by 1C. So to halve the amount of ice you use to get the same cooling you'd need to freeze it to around -150C. If you're going to do that ...


5

I would consider adding some soft brown sugar. The molasses content should increase the stickiness and thickness of the sauce overall. You may want to reduce the amount of white sugar to compensate.


5

Yes, I think you should peel tomatoes, but I have a thing about tomato skins. In my opinion, you should either peel them or use a food mill to weed out the skins. If they don't bother you or your guests, it's an unnecessary step. Even if the tomatoes are diced, some of the tomato skin will separate from the meat of the tomatoes and make a paper-like curl in ...


5

We cook down our tomatoes with skins on and then about half way through we strain the juice out to get rid of skins and seeds. Once we do that it goes back in the pot with our spices until it's reduced enough for our liking. We prefer smooth sauces.


5

It is unnecessary, however some people don't like the skins. They tend to curl up into tube sticks that don't chew very well and can hurt if you chew one accidentally and you have a sensitive tooth or gum disease. Peeling it very easy. Score an x at the bottom of each tomatoe and blanch. The skin will curl back and leave you with a whole but peeled tomato. ...


5

Most sauces that I make require cooking because they have sugars that need to be heated to blend properly in the sauce. Spices that are added also need to be cooked to blend into the sauce evenly. BBQ sauce is mostly added at the end of the cooking process or at the table as a condiment. If it's not cooked first the spices and sugars would give the sauce a ...



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