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2

Really, any sauce you use with other savory meet dishes can be nice on chicken wings. Options include: BBQ sauce most Asian ready made sauces at your grocery store (teriyaki, sweet and sour, etc., even better make a homemade version of one of these sauces) honey mustard melted butter (or extra virgin olive oil) with garlic, Parmesan cheese, and your ...


4

I've never been to Old Wild West but that looks very much like "fry sauce" or "secret sauce" as we use them here in the United States. In looking at Old Wild West's website, it appears to be geared around offering traditional US style burgers, fries, steaks, ribs, etc. so the inclusion of US style fry sauce would make sense. Here is a link to a typical ...


0

The juices in the bag tend to be watered down too much, particularly after a very long cook. You can make a good sauce, but you need to begin with a super concentrated stock in the bag. Then, reduce further after the cook. I think the general practice, at least at my house, is to dispense with the left over liquid in the bag and create any sauces on the ...


0

I use the typical high acid method for canning. Canning jars; new tops and then boiling water bath for 10-15 mins; never had an issue. Although my hot sauce has never last over a year without being used. :) Originally tried using bottles as other mentioned; was too painful to fill in kitchen for my small batches I do (5 gallons at a time). If you are ...


2

Try Mul yeot (Korean corn syrup) or molasses (as suggested by ElendilTheTall). Consider replacing corn starch by potato starch which gives a texture stickier than corn starch. They best way to get the exact stickiness is to try the ingredients in different quantities until you master your dish :). Good luck.


2

You could also try adding a half ounce of pectin so it doesn't throw of the sweet/sour ratio. I use it in hot sauce all the time so it isn't runny or to watery. they sell it in the canning section of most stores.


3

We do a lot of sauces and never use a lid through any part of the process. No need for it at all. Thickness desired is pretty much up to you. Start the process at higher heat so the ingredient's are all blended well then slowly turn down the heat until you get a consistent low simmer. This usually takes about 1/2 hour of standing close by and stirring ...


19

The whole thing should've been done with the lid off. Any time you're reducing a sauce, you want the steam (moisture) to escape. As for 'how thick', the standard test is 'coats the back of a spoon'. If you stir with a spoon, you should be able to lift the spoon out vertically, and the sauce doesn't immediately drip off of it. This test also lets you ...


3

This is really down to both personal preference and experience. You know roughly how long you simmered this sauce for and that the consistency was too thin, so next time you know to simmer it for longer. It's impossible to give a more exact answer because there are too many variables: pan size and temperature, amount of liquid etc. The lid should always be ...


4

I would consider adding some soft brown sugar. The molasses content should increase the stickiness and thickness of the sauce overall. You may want to reduce the amount of white sugar to compensate.


2

I've found the following to make tomato sauces bitter: Tomato seeds Underripe tomatoes Burnt garlic Usually, adding sweetness helps somewhat, although letting the garlic get too brown, let alone burn it, can hardly be corrected for. Some things I've found to help: Extra carrot Brown sugar


1

From the perspective of a person that understands Italian cooking or just cooking in general, sauce used on pizza and pasta is diverse. More or less any sauce you use on one could be used on the other with a few modifications depending on the other attributes of the dish. From the perspective of American consumer marketing the answer is a lot more black ...



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