New answers tagged

5

I would not recommend doing so. The technique you describe is known as monter au beurre, which as you might guess from the name is a common finishing method for sauces in the French culinary tradition. It translates literally to "mount with butter" and is used to provide a rich, velvety mouthfeel to both white and brown sauces. By contrast, teriyaki sauce ...


2

The fancy French name for the first step is called Beurre manie. It is different from roux, which is a cooked mixture of flour and fat, and has not just "a bit" of flour, but almost 50%. This makes your sauce officially "not a Mornay". The traditional classification of sauces is very strict, and if you change one step (in this case thickening with a beurre ...


4

Considering the update to your question, you seem to have a sort of hybrid of two methods. The "Traditional" French method to make a cheese sauce, or Mornay, is described in the steps below with some additional notes at the bottom of alternate methods. If you go through this process to the "Bechamel" step, you'll get the white sauce often used for lasagna. ...


0

What you are making could be called a Mornay sauce. More often it is made with Gruyere, but there are many variations that use other cheeses such as Swiss, Cheddar, Emmental, Parmesan, as well as others. Some traditional recipes for Mornay sauce also call for egg yolks. To break your questions down more, the mixture of butter and flour is a roux. You want ...


0

Yes, you're right. That is the traditional way of making cheese sauce. You can use the same recipe when making lasagne too, however it depends on the type of lasagne your making. A traditional lasagne would use white sauce along with a tomato sauce. White sauce follows the same steps in making as a cheese sauce, but without the cheese.


0

The biggest difference I found in spaghetti sauce and marinara sauce is the use of oregino. Typically spaghetti sauce does not have oregino in it and a marinara sauce does which is usually what gives it is flavor.


8

There is nothing you can add or do to your sauce to remove or mask the burnt taste. Really. Don't even try. Throw it out and start over, being careful not to burn it this time. For some foods, there are various tricks you can try for removing the burnt taste, but they all start with removing the burnt bits. With a sauce where you've already thoroughly ...


0

Your best bet is to change the pan for a clean pan, but I doubt if you can really get rid of the taste. Depends on how burnt it all was. To my knowledge, you cannot add things to burnt food to get rid of the taste.


8

I'm not sure your exact recipe or method, but you cannot get rid of the burnt taste or smell and you will need to start over with fresh ingredients. You don't need or want to boil the milk at any part of the process, just to heat the milk enough to activate the thickener. In the case of a classic flour roux thickened sauce you start by cooking the roux for ...


5

Weak organic acids such as those found in fruits and vegetables (citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid) don't react with sugars. 1 There is no change in acidity, which you correctly defined as measured by the pH. At the same time, sweet and sour are two tastes which are real antagonists - adding something sweet actually reducess the sourness we perceive, ...


5

From a production standpoint, you might actually be better off asking this question on the gardening site. In general, however, for canning purposes you'll want to select a 'determinate' variety -- they tend to have all of their fruit ripen around the same time, rather than having it be spread out across many weeks. Indeterminate tend to be better for ...


1

San Marzano and Viva Italia make very tasty sauces if you grow your own, and boil down the seed-strained mash using only the ripe fruit. It doesn't take many green ones to make the taste too sharp.


2

Okay, all these answers have strange spellings, it should be spelt Hoisin sauce, and should say 海鲜酱 on the bottle, it means "Seafood sauce" though contains no seafood, it's about 50% sugar. In Australia this is what you'll find in restaurants, and you'll be able to find the Lee Kum Kee brand at Chinese shops, and probably also in Coles: Actually, ...


1

It is true that traditionally Peking Duck is eaten with Hoison Sauce or Duck Sauce, however based on your description it doesn't sound like either of these. Hoisin Sauce is really thick, and Duck Sauce isn't a dark color. However I know that a lot of Chinese restaurants have special base brown sauce they use by combining (different ratios for different ...


2

My grandson adores duck pancakes so I tend to buy Sweet Hoisen Sauce in a squeezy bottle from the Asian supermarket. However, assuming this isn't easily available you can take any shop bought Duck / Hoisen sauce and customise although they tend to be very strong. I find mixing in some runny honey works best to counteract the strength. Ideally, heat a ...


3

In America that sauce is hoisin sauce or possibly (very much less likely) duck sauce or plum sauce. Any of these can be found for purchase easily, or they can be made from scratch.


0

Nothing compares to well made home cooked stock. Almost all commercial stock flavors, cubes, boxed stock, better than pastes, College, Kitchen, Rachael, etc., come from one manufacturing plant. The basic difference is the salt content.


1

1.When cooking the pasta, keep some of the water before draining them. 2. When mixing in the ingredients, add a little bit of the water, so that the ingredients make a sauce instead of just cloying together. For step 2, you need to take your time; toss the ingredients and the pasta together for a couple of minutes. You need to use a hot pan to mix the ...


0

This calls for a more refined answer then yes or no. (and this will no doubt generate some minus votes...but read me out). At the end of this answer you will find a YES, is you use your sauce reheated. How would you like to answer "is it safe to cross a road?". There is a risk of harm, so: no? That is the correct answer, but IMHO, not a usefull one.Nothing ...


0

In general (if it is about random sauce): Unless the sauce is so heavy in sugar (unlikely - 120°C would mean you are making a tomato syrup that will be as thick as honey when cool), oil or thickeners that it will reach pressure-canning temperatures when heated by an oven - NO. The cans are at ambient pressure, so any mixture in them that is dominated by ...


0

No, it is not safe. You need a pressure canner. That's what the USDA says about anything containing meat: There are no safe options for canning these foods listed below in a boiling water canner. See http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/soups.html for a table of pressures and processing times.


2

Unless your garlic has fungus growing on it or is badly discolored it's unlikely this flavor is from it. Garlic generally keeps very well and is still safe to use, and still flavorful even when it's a bit shriveled. It's much more likely these off flavors are coming from another ingredient, and could be a sign of some sort of contamination, in which case ...


1

No, you cannot salvage it. First, once a flavor is in a dish, there is no way to remove it. Masking it slightly (which diverts the attention from it but does not remove it) and dilution are possibilities, but removal isn't. Second, mildew is mold, and many species of mold are toxic to humans. As there is no way to find out if yours is toxic or harmless, ...


2

We put it back in the blender and pulsed a few times. Good as new!


1

I'm just wondering why you wouldn't simply add 2 or 3 drops of Kitchen Bouquet? If you're simply looking for that yummy colour, it's perfect. I know, I know....you specified not adding something like this but I'm curious as to why.


1

The problem is: Bought stocks tend to have a long ingredients list, and create a "shadow recipe" effect easily - important or problematic ingredients get carried into the dish via some bought product that they were arbitrarily mixed into, confusing recipe writers, learners, recipe followers alike. For example, a lot of vegetable stocks carry turmeric and ...


8

All excellent information, but can I answer bluntly: none of them come even CLOSE to the real thing. Once you use fresh stock, you will never, ever go back. Really. Making stock is easy, cheap, and as said above, unattended time. Stock forms the base of the kitchen, once you have it, you will notice the taste of everything you make improve so much. Get some ...


19

There's a great deal of variation in the quality of the pre-made stocks you get from different sources, so there's no clear-cut answer. Here's the types you might find: Stock cubes: these are dehydrated stock, or sometimes just chemicals meant to taste like it. It's the lowest quality option. There's a lot of variation here, I've found some brands (knorr ...


4

Quality varies. I have yet to find a store bought equivalent to homemade, but there are adequate products. It would be worth it to purchase a few samples and find one you like. I would look for something with little to no salt, as it is better to control for that yourself, in your final product. Having said that, making stock yourself, particularly using ...


0

For most smoked/BBQ/low-slow meats, a brining or marinating process with liquid is indicated, and the dry rub is applied just before the smoking/cooking process begins. You could try vinegar, apple cider (I love that one), watered-down beer, etc. I've made my own marinades from combinations also; vinegar and water with Worchestershire, "liquid smoke", and ...


0

I use 35% whipping cream or 35% heavy cream for sauces (dairy section as well). If you want a thicker consistency, I have found adding arrowroot powder or flour is the best. You only need very little.


5

Most sauces that I make require cooking because they have sugars that need to be heated to blend properly in the sauce. Spices that are added also need to be cooked to blend into the sauce evenly. BBQ sauce is mostly added at the end of the cooking process or at the table as a condiment. If it's not cooked first the spices and sugars would give the sauce a ...


7

There are some sauce recipes where you need to thicken them to the point where they'd stay on whatever it is you're grilling. If you didn't cook them down, they'd have the consistency of a marinade, and just drip off. Sometimes you need to evaporate out some of the moisture, but other times you're actually creating chemical changes ... cooking sugar to a ...


11

Most of the popular ingredients for BBQ sauce (vinegar/ketchup/sugar etc.) tend not to mix very well together. I know whenever I've made BBQ sauce, placing all of the ingredients into a pan together they tend to separate and are difficult to combine. Heating up the ingredients, however, causes them to combine better, and after a short time cooking they will ...


2

I can only guess based on what happened to you, but usually when a recipe calls for "cream" and don't distinguish, it usually means heavy whipping cream.



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