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Adjusting the amount of roux in the recipe can affect the consistency of the product. Play both with the volume of roux added, and also with the ratio of flour and butter. Generally speaking, higher ratios of butter to flour will decrease the viscosity of the product. A "slack" roux is generally appropriate for sauces, where peaks form from stirring quickly ...


3

Your sauce is thickening up too much because it's losing moisture. After you cook your cheese sauce to perfection and mix it in with your pasta 2 things are happening: The sauce loses moisture due to evaporation. It's hot, and even with the lid on you will still lose moisture The pasta will soak up water from the sauce. It's just starch, and starch sponges ...


2

Mine just separated and all you do is add boiling water a drop at a time while stirring and it comes back together. If this doesn't work you can slowly add another egg yolk. A few reasons it would separate are it gets too hot, the butter or fat is added too quickly or its kept warm for too long -- should be served right away.


3

I don't think any kind of dilution will work. The water in your mustard jar is a lot more like mustard with the solids filtered out than mustard with extra liquid added. It's roughly in equilibrium with the mustard itself, so it's nice and full of all the mustard aromatics. If you add water, you reduce that concentration, and get something much less ...


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You could try diluting the mustard with water and/or vinegar with some soaking time and then filtering it through a coffee filter to remove the actual mustard.


4

Mustard is mostly vinegar, so instead of diluting mustard with water, try vinegar, or vinegar and water.


3

Mint is closely related to Basil and can be treated in the same way. So for a tomato sauce you will probably get the b est results by adding bruised mint leaves towards the end of the process. Too much cooking will boil off the more subtle aromatic flavours and you will end up with something a bit harsh and medical. It may even be best to add ripped mint ...


-3

In general this sort of sauce is safe to bottle in sterilised containers and should keep for at least a few weeks, Here the fat content form the oils, the salt and the acid from the lemons should act as natural preservatives and is no different from jam, chutney or any other traditional preserve. It is best if you bottle it while still hot as this will ...


2

Sorry to rain on your parade, but unless you use an acid which you forgot to mention, this is a happy breeding ground for botulism bacteria (Clostridium botulinum). You are creating anaerobic conditions with the oil, which means this specific bacteria are happy to multiply there. Unfortunately, a simple boil, even for 20 minutes, won't make it safe. It ...


1

I haven't had that specific sauce before, but I've had similar sauces (FYI, if you want to buy the sauce without buying the potstickers, you can buy them in small bottles in Asian food stores). I don't know the exact ratios, but you can always start with a ratio of 1:1:1 of soy sauce (Kikkoman would do just fine here), rice vinegar (not shaoxing, that's a ...


7

The 4th version you gave is optimal from a chemistry standpoint; the process of using heat to melt a soft fat and dissolve a powder into a liquid by stirring is going to be at it's most efficient when the ingredients can fully interact with each other without all that pasta in the way. It seems the main issue at hand here is the 10-15 minute wait for ...


0

I don't know about the other two, but both xanthan and guar gum are hydrocolloids (hydrocolloids are essentially substances that gel up in the presence of water). Guar gum comes from the guar bean while xanthan gum is essentially bacteria poop. Both gums are usually used in commercial ice creams; guar gum helps prevent the formation of ice crystals while ...



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