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2

Passata is crushed tomato. Tomato paste is a concentrate of tomato produced by cooking for a long time, removing seeds and skin, and cooking further. They are different products that are going to produce different results, both flavor-wise and in terms of texture. If I were you, I would not add extra water at all, if you are going to use the Passata. I ...


1

I think the sauce you are looking for may be Nam Prik Nam Pla, pictured below. The basic recipe is simply sliced birds' eye chilies soaked in fish sauce. Some recipes call for both red and green chilies. Other recipes call for other ingredients such as lime juice, sugar or brown sugar, garlic, shallots, etc. EDIT Still haven't found anything with Indian ...


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Normally I would say this question is too vague- however a common sauce, found in practically every Indian restaurant, fits that description. Mint chutney: It is basically mint leaves and peppers blended with garlic, lemon and seasonings. It is ubiquitous in Indian cuisine (in several regions) and every Indian restaurant I have been to.


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According to this article from Wikipedia , your debate points 1 & 2 could both be correct. Butterscotch is a type of confectionery whose primary ingredients are brown sugar and butter, although other ingredients such as corn syrup, cream, vanilla, and salt are part of some recipes. According to "Housewife's Corner" in an 1848 newspaper, the real ...


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It's Alfredo sauce and according to Domino's nutrition guide it's made of: Water Cream (Cream, Milk) Parmesan Cheese (Part-Skim Milk, Cheese Cultures, Salt, Enzymes) Asiago Cheese (Pasteurized Milk, Cheese Culture, Salt, Enzymes) Margarine (Palm Oil, Water, Salt, Vegetable Monoglycerides, Whey Solids,Sodium Benzoate [Preservative], Natural ...


2

Finn here. Tillikastike (dill sauce) is almost always prepared with kermaviili, a type of viili (vaguely yoghurt-like fermented milk product) which is unfortunately basically unknown outside Scandinavia. Gräddfil, mentioned in Captain Giraffe's answer, is the Swedish version of this. Sour cream is the closest substitute, but it's much heavier, creamier ...


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I usually very slowly cook my peppers in a lemon juice infused syrup. This has to me at least the effect of gently activating the pepper flavours and infuses the pepper with other flavours that albeit don't take the bitterness away at least mask them ever so slightly.


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I've used citrus, salt, sugar and the bitterness still shines through. Yes, that's how it's going to be. Once a taste, especially bitterness, is present in a dish, you cannot remove it any more. You can try to dilute it, or to distract the senses with other tastes. I assume you don't want to dilute, because this will also dilute the super hot peppers, ...


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I use pineapple, garlic, onions, carrot, apple cider vinegar; citric acid. Have played with roasting the above vs not; gives a more complex flavor. The carrot and onion seem to calm down the bitterness. Alternatively; you can try my jelly recipe minus the pectin (very sweet base you could build off of): 4 cups granulated sugar strawberries habaneros 1 ...


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Capsaicin is an extremely bitter(in addition to spicy) off-white crystalline powder. The bitterness is also very dependent on the individual. You'll need to add a lot more sugar or possibly vinegar to offset this. The flavor of certain fruits play well with chilies including stone fruits and mango. And, anecdotally at least, are know to counteract the ...


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Leek is really great for people who think onion is "too strong". I have used leek in recipes calling for onion on multiple occasions to get rid of some leek.


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maybe this is not very "cheffy" but then i am not a cheffy cook anyway... In sauces i've used Chive, Celery (long) and Leek with moderate success. Chive i like especially but i use differently from onions, in red sauces especially i keep about half of it back and add it to the sauce with 3-5 min to go so it doesnt only work as a substitute but also add abit ...


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I'd say shallots would be your best bet. While they are both part of the allium family, shallots tend to have a sweeter taste that's less sharp than your average onion. Spring onions, leeks and chives might work as well but do keep in mind that they're hardly perfect substitutes as they're more peppery than they are sharp and pungent. However, if you don't ...



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