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2

It doesn't sound like the sugar caramelized. When you start off cooking sugar, it will taste sugary, and it will stay that way unless you cook it long enough. It needs to become more of a golden brown color, at which point the taste evolves from sugary to a caramel taste. Here is an article on methods to caramelize sugar: http://www.wikihow.com/Caramelize-...


2

By 'cream,' I am assuming you mean heavy whipping cream, which is normally used in caramel sauce, and not sweetened condensed cream, which some people use in place of sweetened condensed milk in certain recipes. The whipping cream in itself, is not sweet, so I'm not sure what the issue could be. Did you accidentally put too much sugar in? Or maybe next time ...


5

Heat is helpful. I used to make a peanut butter/tabasco/soy sauce satay, and getting the parts to combine cold was practically impossible. Warming the peanut butter first softened it enough that I could beat the other liquids into it with a fork as I added them (and they're both water-based so won't mix very well with the oily peanut butter). A few ...


5

When making sauces with things like peanut butter, almond butter, tahini, etc., oil is the thing to add to help thin it out. For peanut butter, you could add peanut oil, canola oil, toasted sesame oil, or a light olive oil with a more neutral taste (or perhaps others). I've done this before when making sauces for pasta and it's worked perfectly. To make ...


17

If you add all the liquids and a big solid lump of peanut butter, you'll have a tough time getting it all smooth, as stirring the (thin) liquid parts won't affect the (solid) peanut butter lumps, and the lumps (once they're small enough) will just swim around your spoon and not break down further. You need to gradually dilute the peanut butter with the ...


0

I think de-glazing the cast iron pan would be a good solution. After the meat is cooked, remove it from the cast iron pan, and with the pan still on the heat, add a small amount of liquid. Just about enough to cover the bottom of the pan 1/4 inch. Then scrape the bottom with wooden spoon to get up all that goodness stuck to the bottom. Add this to your ...


3

In Thailand, they never refrigerate fish sauce--but they go through it so fast, it doesn't have time to go "off". Fish sauce will go off no matter what you do. It gets darker and funkier. If I have a bottle that has gone dark, I throw it away. It's not that it would hurt you to eat it, but for me, the taste is ruined. I lived in Thailand for nine years and ...


0

I would suggest mushroom catsup. It is a thin, brown, salty and savory sauce that tends to be used much the same way as Worcestershire sauce - and similarly to soy sauce, to add salt and depth of flavor while cooking or to season at the table. It is one of my favorite vegetarian substitutions. Geo Watkins' brand is safe for vegetarians and vegans, and (I ...


2

It is hard to answer, unfortunately as OP description is a little vague, a picture of both "take out" and "homemade" versions would be helpful. Are you missing a certain fragrance, taste, texture, appearance, or all/some of the above? We'll start by going through the ingredients you listed, or possibly missed out. Day old Rice What kind of rice is used,...


0

Most likely to be some form of Dark Soy Sauce, especially if it was a thin liquid. A few drops would have changed the colour of the rice substantially. (Of course a Dark Soy Sauce diluted with water would help control the amount of colour change desired.)


1

A bit late to the party but .... Onion and celery have similar effect in the mirepoix, the leeks will have a similar effect but with more depth on the sweet side & carrot will bring some sweetness. Based on that, depending on what you want to cook, there are some guidelines. For stews, keep in mind that some of the next ingredients might add some ...



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