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14

Here in Argentina is very common to bbq LOTS of sausages for big parties. Just for reference: To ease the work of turning them, we usually hold them together with metal skewers, that also serve the purpose of draining the fat: But if you don't prick them (besides of the aforementioned holes), they usually EXPLODE. Note: here the skins are usually ...


14

A very simple answer why you prick sausages. When the sausages get heated up, the fat content and also air pressure inside start to grow. Pricking sausgaes allow the air and fat to be 'released', otherwise, the skin of the sausages will start to crack which eventually will result in losing more juice and 'fat'. Yes, Pricking may lead to dry sausages, so you ...


11

Pepperoni is a variety of Salami. Salami is a dried sausage which can be made of pork, beef, veal, horse, donkey, poultry or game. Different spices, smoking and vegetable ingredients give the different salame their particular taste. Pepperoni limits its ingredients to beef pork and poultry and belongs to the more spicy varieties of salame.


11

It depends on what chorizo you're using. If you're using soft (i.e. uncooked) chorizo then no, you don't need to remove the skin, because it should cook with the sausage. If you are using the cured, ready to eat chorizo you should take the skin off as it will be tough. This may well vary by brand, incidentally.


10

Use less heat. It's not clear if you used any fat here. If you do, you have to be aware of the smoke point of whatever oil you're using. By turning down the heat you'll decrease the amount of fat you are burning, and turning into smoke. If you want to still get a nice crisp exterior you can briefly sear your sausages on high heat prior to fully cooking. ...


10

It is due to a combination of several factor, depending on how the particular sausage was made: Dry cured sausages contain curing salts, a mixture of regular salt and sodium nitrate (which breaks down into sodium nitrite), which prevents the growth of botulism while the sausage cures. Meat for dry cures sausage is also often frozen to specific temperatures ...


8

Generally it's things that have been prepared such that there's some sort of added preservative -- salt, sulfates, sulfides, nitrates, etc. So this would include all hams except 'fresh ham', almost all deli meats, all sausages, bacon, jerky, corned beef, etc. So yes, sausage is considered a processed meat. If you want to get all technical about what ...


7

I'd say no never prick the sausages if you can help it. the fat inside helps to keep them succulent and moist, and if you have a problem with the splitting and are pricking them to release the pressure as was stated by @foodrules, then I'd say you are cooking them over too high a heat. Lower the heat, or if you are BBQing move them further from the source, ...


7

A lower heat. You should be able to fry them at a comfortable heat (e.g. medium rather than medium high). Also, if you add any oil to the pan, use a higher smoking point oil like canola. If you have a splatter screen, that can help to trap some of the oil rather than letting it fall back into the pan and burning.


7

I'm assuming you're wanting to make classic dried sausage such as the salamis and saucisson of Italy and France. Common salt is certainly the key to the drying process and a quarter pound per 10 pounds of meat is a pretty commonly used ratio, but you must also use a curing salt which helps protect against some of the truly nasty food poisoning bugs such as ...


7

So yesterday I tried out the experiment. I made the naked fatty per the normal recipe, and using the gimme lean breakfast sausage. The two primary concerns I had were (a) to ensure the sausage didn't come apart during the smoking process and (b) to ensure a good amount of smokiness was imparted. With respect to (a), the heat I worried might denature the ...


7

The term "dog" has been used as a synonym for sausage since 1884 and accusations that sausage makers used dog meat to at least 1845. According to a myth, the use of the complete phrase "hot dog" in reference to sausage was coined by a newspaper cartoonist in 1900, but there were several earlier references, but no specifics on the origination of the phrase.


6

I always do when pan-frying - it's astonishing how much fat comes out. I prefer the resulting texture. Barbequed sausages really can't be pricked much because of flareups, and I usually try to eat something else if I have a choice, because I find them too greasy. Perhaps my "just right" is someone else's "too dry" - it's certainly true that pricking them ...


6

If you're planning to smoke your sausages, natural casings will allow for greater smoke penetration than many non-natural casings, and they won't impart any odd flavors of their own to the meat. That said, when you first open a container of natural casings, they may have a strong smell because of gas build-up; let them air out (in the fridge!) and they'll be ...


6

I could answer this with the usual "it depends on the sausages" kind of answer, but I think it's important to raise a red flag. I would advise against trying to make dry sausages with a "seat of the pants" recipe and process. The chances of bacterial infection (botulism, most likely) and/or rot are very high if you don't do things right. I would be ...


6

Since most are pre-cooked (in US Supermarkets anyway), and you are just re-heating, your (still tasty) options are pretty limited with respect to beer brats From the perspective of UW Madison (self-proclaimed "Brat Capital of the World"): Simmer in beer first, then grill. For more info here is a post regarding prep; this method would definitely be the ...


6

You need to let the sausages sit exposed to some air -- refrigerated, of course -- for a few hours (preferably overnight) so that the twisted segments of casing dry out and become tough again. Lay them out on a baking sheet, uncovered, and flip them at some point to make sure the whole surface is drying. If you have space, you can hang them up so that all ...


6

Professional charcutier here. We usually only make beef sausage from grass fed beef, which means our ground beef is very lean. Depending on the recipe, we have various tricks for improving the texture: We add beef fat if available to add richness, or even pork fat if we don't have enough beef fat. For a 5lb batch of ground beef for hamburgers, we'll add ...


5

Pepperoni is simply a variety of hot salami, derived from Italian salami (soppressata from Calabria or spicy dry sausage from Naples). If there is any difference in the pork/beef ratio, that is not what makes the difference between salami and pepperoni; some variety would use more beef, but that is just a regional difference.


5

Well, you don't need to spend hundreds of dollars, but you might need to put in more elbow grease. You can get a hand-crank meat grinder for about $30 or so and a manual sausage stuffer for about the same. You could save on the grinder if you have a food processor or blender that can have its way with the meat.


5

I also find them hard to chew when baked, but they are edible. To make them easier to eat, you want to finish them up using a different method to get a crunch on the outside. I find you can either: turn the heat up in your oven at the end, or broil them briefly pan-fry them after they're done cooking in a little bit of oil on a skillet (cast iron ...


5

Cheese Kranksy or Kasekrainer is the common sausage with cheese. Around 10% cheese seems typical They taste great, and are very popular with children


5

The salt treatment in sausage can cause it to retain a pinker color for a given temperature than would normal ground meat. The fact that you used a trusted thermometer, and that the sausages were well in the safe zone (even conservatively 165 F is more than enough) indicates that the sausage was perfectly safe.


5

If you are looking to smoke the sausage without a casing I would suggest forming your sausage into a leaf, grape or banana or into a corn husk. The banana or corn husk are not edible but the grape leaf would be good to go. I was going to suggest eggroll wraps or spring roll wrappers but I don't think that would be smoker friendly.


4

Personally I avoid supermarket sausages, but if its all you have then usually the premium range are usually alright. As Chad says, as long as its 80%+ meat then it should be OK. I would strongly recommend finding a butcher, ideally one who makes his own sausage. Around me (Midlands, UK) this is fairly common. The specific variety doesn't actually matter ...


4

The good thing about Cumberland sausages is that the meat is supposed to be coarsely chopped and in of itself has a very high meat content. However, all good sausages have this quality also! So in essence look for a sausage with a high meat content (80%+) and you can't go too far wrong.


4

It also very much depends on the type of sausage you are using. Some (usually cheap) sausages use an artificial casing which I find makes the sausage at worst leathery and at best a bit chewy. Assuming you have good quality sausages, the best way to cook them (I find) is to fry them on a cast iron grill pan at a low temperature for a long time, 20-30 ...


4

Generally such health fears will be to do with the amount of additives in "processed meat". The use of Mechanically Reclaimed Meat (MRM) is also rather frowned upon. At the height of the media coverage of such issues in the UK, Turkey Twizzlers were singled out for particular hatred, the ingredients list almost speaks for itself. (Via: ...


4

The cured chorizo available at my local grocery store actually has a plastic skin so obviously that must be removed in order to make it edible. It also has metal clips holding the ends closed, so it's pretty clear that you're not supposed to eat it. So, if you do choose to eat the skin, make sure it's not plastic. Again, it should be pretty obvious.


4

Sausages are pretty forgiving. As long as you don't burn them or leave the center raw, they should come out OK. Since they're pretty fatty (at least the good ones are) there's little chance of drying them out, so when in doubt, cook them a little longer. They'll feel firm, not squishy, when they're done. The easiest way to cook raw sausages is in the oven ...



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