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23

This is going to sound strange, but the 'low calorie oil' that you're looking for is water. What you do is you start the sausages cooking in a little bit of water (about 1 cm; 3/8"). The water will prevent the sauages from getting too hot too quickly, and the fat in them will start to render and leak out into the water. Once the water evaporates, you're ...


5

Curing salts contain sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate. When these curative agents are combined with the amines in meat and exposed to high heat they form carcinogenic compounds called nitrosamines. As the linked article states, commercial producers often add Vit. C to counteract some of the nitrosamine formation, but the curing mix you have might not ...


5

That foam is perfectly natural. The foam is the result of meats natural protein composition. If you've ever poached eggs, or boiled lobster, or cooked a stock, you'll know that the water can become a little scummy. If you leave the pot on, that scum makes a white-ish or grey-ish foam that forms lovely looking rafts. That foam is made of water soluble ...


5

Good Yorkshire pudding is not an art, it's a science. You need three things: Hot fat A hot oven Batter of the right consistency The only raising agent in Yorkshire Pudding is steam from the water in the liquid ingredients. You need to convert that water into steam fast to get a good rise, and you need the batter to crisp up quickly so it doesn't ...


4

While you might be technically correct if you were to call saucisson sec a salami, you do not make saucisson sec from commercial salami. Without knowing how the salami was produced it could be dangerous to try to do so. The pictures you posted seems to be of a cooked salami, which is significantly more perishable than its uncooked cousins. Traditionally, ...


4

Refrigerate them. When it comes down to meat, you should play it safe. Spoiled meat can develop salmonella and other forms of bacteria. Read more about it on the CDC website. That said... I believe the method of preserving you are referring to is confit: In chilly European kitchens before refrigeration, it was common to salt meat, usually duck, ...


4

Oils are fats and there's no such thing as "diet fat". The only way you can get less calories from fat is to eat less of it. The oils used in cooking sprays are the same as those in your bottles, sprays use pressure and chemical additives to create a mist that evenly deposits on a pan, coating it in a thin layer. A thin layer means you eat less, so lower ...


4

The frozen blood (once it is thawed) would be the better option. I would not consider the cooked and coagulated product to be interchangeable with the thawed product.


3

If you cannot splash out on a propane barbecue why not use charcoal? There are plenty of options there, you can pick up very simple bucket barbecues for very little money, and in my personal opinion you get much better flavor from charcoal than gas. For brats a disposable charcoal barbecue will give you decent results, and they are pretty inexpensive. Look ...


3

Most ovens have a 'broil' setting (where the top element is on, and not the lower element). You'll likely want a 'broiler pan' so that you can drain the grease away from the food (and catch it so it doesn't light on fire). They're under $20 online. Set the rack of the oven so that the food will be about 2" from the upper heating element. Heat the broiler ...


3

The StillTasty link you give for the sausages is for all types of fresh, raw sausages, not just pork. That's why it's labeled "SAUSAGES (INCLUDING PORK, BEEF, CHICKEN OR TURKEY) — FRESH, RAW". Most likely, they're getting the 1–2-day limit from the chicken sausages (which are likely to have a higher initial bacteria load than pork or beef). Note that they ...


3

Substitution in preserved foods are generally considered unsafe. Food chemistry is a complicated affair, and cooking is inherently imprecise. Sure, you can find a way to reduce the pH to that of the original recipe. But a salami is a fermented food. Your pH might be the same, but other things will change, for example the composition of the available sugars, ...


2

Your instinct is correct, all your favourites fall into one category of saussage: Brühwurst. This means that they follow the same principle when made, which is Mincing the raw meat and fat with ice or ice water, salt, often curing salt and various spices until a smooth paste forms. This is what you refer to as "pinkish mass". Shaping the saussages (or ...


2

This started as a +1 comment to GgD's answer, but it's too long, so I'll post separately. I agree with GgD: Buy a charcoal grill. You can actually have a "grilled brat" with better taste, for less money than gas. A quick internet search shows small charcoal grills selling for as low as $15-20. And you can do a perfectly fine job grilling on even the ...


2

I am using a frost-free freezer (large) and at the moment am drying 7kg. I have a temp controller which works perfectly, but as the weather changes I get a lot of variation. A humidistat controls a humidifier, so have no trouble in keeping the humidity up, which I like to in the early stages. The problem arises overnight when the ambient temp is lower than ...


2

Running it under hot water for a few seconds an then start at one end with a small cut and pull the rest off. works for me every time


2

Assuming that they are uncooked, you can certainly simmer your brats in beer (don't let them boil, that will burst them). I'd try to get a hold of some Red Hook and use that. Simmer them gently until they are almost done, about 15 minutes. Simmering in beer will only intensify the beeriness of the brat. If you like beer, go for it. If you've got time, do one ...


2

An alternative to Joe's method is to use no frying medium at all, just start the sausages by themselves over lower heat. Once enough of their fat has rendered out into the pan, your can turn it up a bit. This will take longer but also give you a bit more fond to work with once the sausages are cooked, if for example you're making tomato sauce in the pan ...


1

The one on top was probably exposed to air and its surface dried out which darkened it. It's always better to be safe than sorry. I am a little more edgy and eat things others don't, but I have my limits of acceptable also. I wouldn't eat something a week old unless I was sure it was packed and stored properly.


1

I have always peeled my chorizo before using because I thought they were wrapped in some kind of paper as opposed to being skinned. My brother doesn't peel his and he's still alive so I guess it's a preference thing. As for the difficulty in peeling them I have found that the more I pay for my chorizo, the easier they are to peel!!!! I don't know why this is ...


1

If you prick your sausages, you are in the wrong. It defeats the purpose of fat in there in the first place. If you prick them, they dry out. If the casings burst, you're cooking on too high a heat. Cook on a lower heat for an extended time, and the casings caramelise... oh mama! Do not season with salt or pepper before you cook them, the salt will draw ...



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