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13

By "Italian Sausage" I think you mean the seasoned pork sausage available in many supermarkets throughout the US. I've found that a 30-70 mix of beef and turkey/chicken works reasonably well as a substitute when pork is not available. Beef is too strong a flavor and turkey too weak in its own. Flavor-wise most italian sausage has red wine, fennel, and ...


5

Most ovens have a 'broil' setting (where the top element is on, and not the lower element). You'll likely want a 'broiler pan' so that you can drain the grease away from the food (and catch it so it doesn't light on fire). They're under $20 online. Set the rack of the oven so that the food will be about 2" from the upper heating element. Heat the broiler ...


4

I have a jar of "Big John's" pickled sausages and right on the bottom it says "NEVER NEEDS REFRIGERATION"! They sit at stores and bars for for many days if not weeks and are sold by the sausage. I found this on Hannah's Facebook page. "They do not need to be refrigerated after opening in temperatures below 75 degrees. Recommended refrigeration for temps ...


4

If you have not already looked, check the vegetarian section of where-ever you get groceries. At least here in the USA there are several varieties of Italian "sausage" that are entirely meat free and kosher. YMMV, but I find them to be an entirely satisfactory substitute.


3

Boil or steam them using beer (for a traditional flavor combination) or water before grilling. Grill for flavor, not as the sole means of heating them. This is more about cooking faster (or more evenly, anyway) than slicing, though that step will also make them hold together better if sliced after boil/steam and before grilling. But if they are basically ...


3

This started as a +1 comment to GgD's answer, but it's too long, so I'll post separately. I agree with GgD: Buy a charcoal grill. You can actually have a "grilled brat" with better taste, for less money than gas. A quick internet search shows small charcoal grills selling for as low as $15-20. And you can do a perfectly fine job grilling on even the ...


3

If you cannot splash out on a propane barbecue why not use charcoal? There are plenty of options there, you can pick up very simple bucket barbecues for very little money, and in my personal opinion you get much better flavor from charcoal than gas. For brats a disposable charcoal barbecue will give you decent results, and they are pretty inexpensive. Look ...


2

Salumi are generally cured with the addition of starter cultures (Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococus acidilactici, for example). These cultures add to the sour, tangy flavor, but also to the aroma. In addition, Here is a report on glutimate concentration in dry cured ham. (generally cured with salt alone). I am sure the mechanism in cured salumi is ...


2

Your instinct is correct, all your favourites fall into one category of saussage: Br├╝hwurst. This means that they follow the same principle when made, which is Mincing the raw meat and fat with ice or ice water, salt, often curing salt and various spices until a smooth paste forms. This is what you refer to as "pinkish mass". Shaping the saussages (or ...


2

Your local asian supermarket might have vegetarian intestine, which is probably made from alginate. But if it's frankfurters/hot dogs you're trying to make, you don't actually need the casings to be part of the sausage. You can just use plastic wrap and shape your sausages with a sushi mat.


2

I am using a frost-free freezer (large) and at the moment am drying 7kg. I have a temp controller which works perfectly, but as the weather changes I get a lot of variation. A humidistat controls a humidifier, so have no trouble in keeping the humidity up, which I like to in the early stages. The problem arises overnight when the ambient temp is lower than ...


1

Bar Akiva, you are very lucky as this is a really easy problem to solve: just don't use sausage in your ragu! Traditional ragus don't have sausage at all. The usual recipes call for minced beef or minced calf meat as a primary ingredient; to it you can add a quantity of minced pork to add more flavour (by adding fat), balancing on your taste between 50% ...


1

Not to discount any information in moscafj's answer, there are other factors that affect the aroma of certain salame and cured sausage products. Some, for example have natural salame aromas added to their mixture. From Academia Barilla : The meat is mixed with salt, spices and natural aromas. These natural aromas can be found in packages on the ...


1

If you prick your sausages, you are in the wrong. It defeats the purpose of fat in there in the first place. If you prick them, they dry out. If the casings burst, you're cooking on too high a heat. Cook on a lower heat for an extended time, and the casings caramelise... oh mama! Do not season with salt or pepper before you cook them, the salt will draw ...



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