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12

It is due to a combination of several factor, depending on how the particular sausage was made: Dry cured sausages contain curing salts, a mixture of regular salt and sodium nitrate (which breaks down into sodium nitrite), which prevents the growth of botulism while the sausage cures. Meat for dry cures sausage is also often frozen to specific temperatures ...


6

Professional charcutier here. We usually only make beef sausage from grass fed beef, which means our ground beef is very lean. Depending on the recipe, we have various tricks for improving the texture: We add beef fat if available to add richness, or even pork fat if we don't have enough beef fat. For a 5lb batch of ground beef for hamburgers, we'll add ...


5

If you are looking to smoke the sausage without a casing I would suggest forming your sausage into a leaf, grape or banana or into a corn husk. The banana or corn husk are not edible but the grape leaf would be good to go. I was going to suggest eggroll wraps or spring roll wrappers but I don't think that would be smoker friendly.


5

The salt treatment in sausage can cause it to retain a pinker color for a given temperature than would normal ground meat. The fact that you used a trusted thermometer, and that the sausages were well in the safe zone (even conservatively 165 F is more than enough) indicates that the sausage was perfectly safe.


4

Hanks of casing aren't generally that big (of course, this is relative - if you're only making one pound of sausage it's gigantic!) so I've always soaked the whole thing. They should be slightly easier to pull apart, but it helps a lot if you soak them in slightly warm water and then after they've soaked for a bit, find the end and run warm water through ...


4

Remember that veal is merely very young beef; the chuck (which is the beef equivalent to the pork shoulder) is probably your best choices. The chuck naturally has that best proportion of muscle to fat for sausage making. That said I would actually discourage you from choosing veal as a meat for sausage making, ground veal is [IMHO] really 'nothing special' ...


4

If you're looking to parboil, likely your best bet is one that you've already dismissed -- inedible casings that you'd remove after cooking. You might even be able to get away with clingfilm, parchment paper or non-stick aluminium foil. If you really want an edible casing, they do exist, just enter 'vegetarian sausage casing' into your preferred internet ...


3

Sure. You want to grind the cueritos with leaner meat to make a higher fat ground meat? There is no reason that wouldn't work. You might find it necessary to remove the very outer skin, but I'd try a small batch without taking that step. The grinding might eliminate any textural problems (or it might not, so try a little bit first).


3

I am going to guess that you are likely getting british or irish breakfast sausage. The national dutch sausage, Frikandel, is minced, skinless, and not usually eaten at breakfast. There is a perception amongst the dutch that Americans eat nothing but meat and fat in huge portions. I did a semester abroad in the Netherlands. For the first few days, the ...


3

I'm unfamiliar with Hannah's, but if they are pickled with vinegar you might be okay so long as you consume them within a few days. If it were dilly beans or gherkins I'd say you're probably fine (depending on the amount of vinegar) - but meat is a different matter. Do they look anything like this (or have similar ingredients)?


3

According to Smoking Meat Forums, you would need 2 ounces of pink salt for 50 lbs of sausage, which is a ratio of 0.0025 pink salt to meat (they provide three significant digits) for short curing time sausages. These are sausages which will be cooked or smoked. Therefore, converting to metric, 50 kg, you would require 125 grams or so pink salt. Note ...


2

I purchased los angelitos chorizos in NJ the casing is hard has metal on ends. it says remove casing before cooking. It makes sense-the casing is plastic and I am more concerned with bacteria.


2

Another alternative would be to possibly try adding rice to the sausage like a boudan (sp?) that you would find in Louisiana and Alabama. This may change the flavor a little bit, but it will make it a softer sausage.


2

Slice off a chunk you need, shallow cut length ways, run under tap and ensure all skin is damp, peels away easily.


1

The name or chemical compound responsible for a specific quality of some spices (numbness) Should answer your question concerning numbness pretty handily. Eugenol can intensify over time. It just so happens that I have been playing with that particular phenomenon quite a bit lately.


1

I agree with the response regarding the salt content. Salt preserves and cures the meat and helps it keep it's color. That's why bacon is reddish and not grey when cooked. I recently made a batch of loose breakfast sausage and had the same experience. I then placed a 1/4# in a Ziplock and poached it to 160 and one to 175 degrees and when I broke it open ...


1

You mention that the pink was more toward the edges. Could it have been a smoke ring? (Picture: ...


1

I agree with Cos - Veal is wasted in sausage in terms of flavor and especially in terms of fat content (not to mention the money you'd be spending!) When making sausage, fat is crucial - in fact when I've made venison sausage in the past, I've always added some fatty cuts of pork (shoulder or similar) along with the venison as otherwise when it's cooked ...


1

Officially, you want 2% salt and 1/9th of that Pink salt. Although for fresh sausage you may find that a bit salty. 1% or 1.5% maybe taste better and be healthier. modern medicine is now onboard with cancer caused by Nitrites. If your meat is clean, from a good source and not from 100 different pigs, consider skipping the pink stuff. Salt IS indeed a ...


1

Hot dogs are a an example indigenous to North America of a class of sausages called emulsified sausages. The meat and fat are ground so finely that they emulsify together into a smooth paste. Other sausages of this type include German Frankfurter W├╝rstchen (of which the hot dog is a descendant) and Italian Mortadella (which is also the pre-cursor of the ...


1

Take the sausage when it is still frozen, run a few seconds under hot water, take the end and start sliding casing down. Perfect sausage and ready to go. If the sausage is thawed out it will break. Works and sausage is so much easier to eat.


1

I find the answer depends on what you are doing. If the recipe is one where you add whole chorizos to a bean stew say, for slow boiling with the beans, then you will need to keep the skin on. This will tend to hold it together and limit oozing to either end of the sausage. the lovely paprika flavours will seep out into the stew, but the sausage will be ...



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