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9

Most likely, you're not heating your pan enough before placing the scallops in. Without knowing your exact method it's hard to say what's going wrong, but 1-2 tbsp of oil should be enough for a normal amount of scallops. To learn about properly heating your pan, I recommend this link: ...


8

Most people I know who cook scallops actually overcook them. I always buy sushi-grade diver's scallops from my fishmonger. These can be eaten raw, and are most delicious when done so. However if you want to add a little extra flavor, and liven up the appearance of these then sear these briefly on a high heat. If you can get these from a quality source ...


6

Most likely, your pan is not hot enough before you put the scallops in. The pan should be hot enough for a drop of water to bounce around on the pan instead of just evaporating. There have been other similar questions: How do I prevent food from sticking to a standard (non-coated) pan?


6

When you cook scallops use the fresh variety and not those that come in brine. Once you've cleaned and removed the foot, make sure they are dry or at least not dripping with water, as this will cause the oil to splash. An alternative would be to wrap a each scallop in bacon and skewer then with a cocktail stick or a sate skewer, add a little lemon juice and ...


6

Since the original recipe does not say explicitly that the scallops should be cooked from a frozen state, you should thaw them in the refrigerator before making the dish. Do not precook them—just thaw them, and cook them as per the recipe. You will also want to pat them dry with a paper towel or lint free towel, so that they are as dry as reasonably ...


5

High heat and quick cooking are essential for scallops. Several minutes cooking will result in fishy racquetballs. Firstly, remove the scallops from the fridge half an hour or so before you cook them, so they're not stone cold (but don't put them anywhere warm or in the sun). Heat your olive oil in a pan until it starts to sizzle. Season the scallops, then ...


5

I've had this issue with crappy supermarket scallops before. Alton Brown covered this. From http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season9/scallops/scallop_trans.htm (section 5): dry scallops are usually ivory, or slightly pink, or even orange in color, not white. Of course, they don't actually look dry. The term refers to the fact that these lovely ...


5

Make sure you are not crowding your scallops in the pan. If there are too many, then there is not enough empty surface for liquid released to boil off. This also ends up steaming your scallops rather than frying, which I don't like nearly as much. If you have enough hot, open pan around the scallops, then liquid will boil off very quickly.


4

Scallops are like little sponges. Don't let 'em soak in water, or they'll absorb a ton of it and then release it all when you start cooking them. If you need to wash them, put them in a strainer, and run them under the water for a second. Then pat them dry with some paper towels.


3

Salt and pepper them. Cook them in butter in a frying pan. Don't crowd them in the pan, or they will steam. Time depends on the size of the scallop, but they don't take long to cook. If you over cook them they will be quite rubbery. When they're cooked, take them off the heat and squeeze some lemon juice over them. I'll generally serve them over mashed ...


3

How big are the scallops? If they're the really fat ones, then cooking them all the way through on top of the stove might be hard. Sear them on both sides in a pan, then stick the pan in a hot oven for a couple minutes.


3

My first advice is to use a bit more oil, maybe. I recently did scallops with a recipe from Thomas Keller, and his recipe calls for quite a bit of oil--probably 3 tbs or more (don't remember precisely, but it was way more than I would have put on my own). This was also my most successful pan-seared scallop batch to date, so I think he's onto something. And ...


2

This doesn't particularly answer the question, but the use of roe seems to fade in and out of fashion every so often. I remember 10 years ago (and back in the UK) scallops were always served with the roe, and cooked with them. Now it I haven't seen a roe anywhere near the scallops. Certainly, the more sea-food and authentic the restaurant, the more likely ...


2

The most important point is you bought them 'fresh'. It is my understanding that scallops have to be flash-frozen within minutes of being caught, (probably somewhere like in the middle of the Bay of Biscay.) Therefore, any scallops you see being sold in an unfrozen state have already started decomposing. If you don't eat them immediately they should be ...


1

Comments in this blog comment could offer a clue to the blue color. The most relevant part says: The blue color in the liquid is due to a change in the natural chemical composition of the scallop meat during spawning. That doesn't explain the hard white stuff, but maybe it'll put you on the right track. If there's a state or university agricultural ...


1

Scallop roe parfait is a firm favorite in my kitchen. Gently poach the roe then blitz with soft butter and whatever spices/flavours take your fancy. Then set in a mould lined with cling film. We use small PVC pipe to set it as it's a garnish for dish. But served by itself spread on toast is a real treat for everyone


1

I deep fry mine in tempura batter at my restaurant as Garnish for my scallop dish, give a different texture to The dish.


1

I always use the roes, an interesting way to use them is cook them seperately, and in a different way to add another dimension to your dish, for example, i char grill the Scallop meat, and just before serving, i pan fry the roes in garlic,lemon, chilli and parsley butter, and serve with them, on a rocket and herb salad...Fantastic!!


1

This is called the "roe". More on wikipedia: Scallop Red roe is that of a female, and white, that of a male. It's optional if you want to eat it, personally it don't like the taste. More on (ahem) Yahoo Answers


1

Its normal for scallops to stick to a non-stick surface sautee pan. Let them sit until they come loose from the pan. It may take a few minutes but when they do thei will be browned perfectly. Turn and cook another 2 min. on the other side and spoon melted butter over them during this time. YUMMM!


1

Dont use s nonstick pan- a pan that is hot enough to get a good sear is also hot enough to burn the nonstick coating- which is very bad for you (the fumes also kills birds). Nonstick pans also tend to be aluminum and thin, they don't hold enough heat- the pan cools down and you don't get a good sear. Use cast iron or carbon steel pans if you can, they're ...


1

Like the other comments mentioned you need to make sure that the oil is very hot before you add the scallops. Also, for a very nice color take a small amount of butter, about half a teaspoon, and add it to the oil. This is might go against your intuition, however, it is the technique used by most high end French restaurants to sear Scollaps, Veal, Ris de ...


1

I'd suggest you have too much oil. I've found that with a non stick pan you don't really need oil, or just a smidgin. Just get the pan nice and hot put the scallop in leave it alone to sear for a couple of minutes, time will depend on the size of your scallops, then flip and finish the other side, usually for a little less time. serve with the side you ...


1

My fave preparation of scallops is to pan-sear them in a hot skillet (heavy iron FTW!) so that they brown. There must be a high(er) carbohydrate content in the juice that flows from the scallops to have it brown so nicely, but I'm not certain. And be sure to deglaze the pan. All that caramelized yummy goodness in the bottom of the skillet is too good to pass ...


1

coincidentally, i had a scallop dish last night at a restaurant that was served with pan-seared cauliflower florets, a butter & cream sauce made with capers, and topped with toasted pine nuts. it was really tasty! the scallops were probably seared along with the lightly steamed cauliflower. but i also recommend just frying the scallops in butter, and ...


1

Pat them dry. flour them, a little salt and pepper too. Heat a skillet up and sizzle the butter/oil. Medium high. Put in the scallops - not too many. 2 mins a side. Toss in some garlic and mix with the butter. A little fresh parmesan can be pretty good too. Or, in place or parmesan, a little soy sauce, sizzled in the butter and garlic. Serve as an ...



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