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20

This article indicates that it's probably gall bladder bile: The gall bladder [...] sometimes [...] breaks even when you are cleaning the fish very carefully and close to the skin. If the gall bladder is broken, the greenish yellow biliary fluid pours immediately out into the inside of the fish and starts to absorb into the meat. The meat becomes bitter. ...


14

This a a great video that explains every step. She cuts the head off by slicing above the eyes, so removing the beak is a part of cleaning the tentacles. These are your first cuts. Cut the head off above the eyes, and slit the head open. Rinse out the guts, there will be some connective tissue that needs to be cut away or broken to get to all of the ...


13

Fresh seafood shouldn't be overly "fishy". It's generally older seafood that will get a stronger "fishy" smell and flavour. That said, there are 3 approaches to a "less fishy" result: Absorb/reduce fishiness: you can always try something like soaking it in milk (which you can then save to use for a fishy bechamel when your sister isn't dining with you). ...


11

First, about the temperature. Your safest option is to use a gun ;) The correct temp for shallow frying is between 150 and 190 degrees celsius. So if you have an infrared "gun" (a thermometer which neasures the temp of the surface at which it is pointed), use it to determine the stove setting at which the temperature of the dry (not ptfe coated) pan ...


11

According to this site and confirmed by several others I found on the internet, the Humboldt Squid produces ammonia chloride as a defense mechanism, or as a side effect of asphixiation, or maybe both. I couldn't find terribly reliable advice on how to avoid the contamination, but two points were repeatedly suggested on various bulletin boards: When you ...


8

Your instincts are good; throwing tasty broth away is a criminal waste! I have a couple ideas that are worth a shot. Risotto: use it for the broth or stock. You may wish to add some more sausage and seasfood bits in for extra tastiness. Rice/pilaf: use the broth in place of water for cooking the rice. It'll give a richer flavor to the result. Bisque: ...


8

This is definitely a rapa whelk. These are indigenous to the seas in the far East, but got somehow imported into the Black Sea and overtook the ecosystem. First, people around the Black sea didn't have much use for them. The waves washed the shells of dead whelks ashore and these got crafted into souvenirs for tourists. Then, people started fishing them ...


7

It's quite common. I had Garlic Prawns (shrimps) in a faily exclusive restaurant in Darling Harbour (Sydney) last weekend, with shells still attached to the tail. From what I can gather it's mostly about aesthetics. I suspect there is some truth in the idea that it gives the impression of more shrimp for your money as well. Some also argue that it adds ...


7

The only parts that you need to avoid are the intestinal tract - the black line that runs through the tail, and the sac right behind the eyes which includes the brain, stomach, and other organs. The tomalley is the edible yellow-green pasty substance which serves as the liver and pancreas. However, there are advisories in place by US federal and state ...


7

Probably: You heated the oil up too much. There was water on the fish (water and hot oil do nasty things). Next time: Wash the fish with cold water and pad it dry with a paper towel. Heat up the oil. To test whether the oil is hot enough drop a small drop of water into it. If it "sizzles" (is there a better word?), the oil is ready and you can put the ...


7

They look like a species of whelk, which is a catch-all term for sea-snails. See the Wikipedia article here.


7

I don't like the recipe much. First of all, paella is a one pan dish, normally. That is, all ingredients are cooked in the same pan (paella) and in sequence. This means that all the flavors are stacked one on top of the other. Second, if you are going to use saffron, the most expensive spice in the world, hold down on any other spices. In particular, most ...


7

Calamari or squid is of course famous for being difficult to cook, because it gets tough or rubbery. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking, octopus and squid meat are very rich in collagen: They are chewy when lightly cooked, tough when cooked to the denaturing temperatures of their collagen, around 120 - 130 F / 50 - 55 C, and become ...


7

Full-size octopus are tough and rubbery when cooked, so the purpose of pre-cooking is to tenderize. According to some research, this can be done by hanging the octopus out to dry and then beating the crap out of it, but that sounds like more trouble than simply poaching. If your octopus is already cleaned (i.e. ink sac, stomach, and beak removed) then all ...


7

The color should not be a problem for you as long as red coloring in beef packaging doesn't bother you. That's right, that blue dye is blood. Crustaceans, like the prawn, crab, and lobster, and horseshoe crabs have hemocyanin in their blood to transport oxygen instead of hemoglobin, which we have. Hemocyanin has copper in it to give it its color rather than ...


6

I've had this issue with crappy supermarket scallops before. Alton Brown covered this. From http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season9/scallops/scallop_trans.htm (section 5): dry scallops are usually ivory, or slightly pink, or even orange in color, not white. Of course, they don't actually look dry. The term refers to the fact that these lovely ...


6

Make sure you are not crowding your scallops in the pan. If there are too many, then there is not enough empty surface for liquid released to boil off. This also ends up steaming your scallops rather than frying, which I don't like nearly as much. If you have enough hot, open pan around the scallops, then liquid will boil off very quickly.


6

I've had Salmon Trout. They are a pink fleshed trout, that mimics the flavour of Salmon somewhat. My favourite preparation is to do it as a Yerevan Trout. Essentially Roast the fish filets, prepare the sauce - Lemon, Butter, Capers, Artichokes, and any pan juice you can get. Serve beside your favourite rice.


6

I think it's a fine question. If I were in your position, I'd definitely go for option 2 - I think pre-cooked and re-steamed crab would end up a lot like oversteamed crab: mushy and gross. As for keeping them alive, when I was a kid we used to go crabbing every weekend. Mom would just keep them in a cardboard box in the kitchen until we were ready to eat ...


6

There's no fixed number, as you have too many other variables: How big are the people eating? (athletes are going to eat more than kids or people on diets) What are they being served with? (If it's just a table filled w/ crabs, they're going to eat more than if you have other side dishes available) How experienced are the people with eating crabs? (Some ...


6

There are several major varieties of clam chowder, which you can find enumerated on the Wikipedia page. New England clam chowder is characterized by a dairy base, usually with some sort of salt pork or bacon, and potatoes. Note: the term chowder basically just means soup or stew, usually with seafood of some sort--very different dishes may go by the name.


6

If a third of a batch of anything is dead, I would expect the other 2/3 to be near death and taste accordingly.


6

Parasites in fish are common. In short, your fishmonger could have done a better job of pulling them out (unless you bought them whole). They are not deemed harmful if cooked properly (see the FAO link below). There are guidelines and standards about the number of Nematodes in a given amount of fish. Some types of fish are more susceptible than others, ...


6

There are two types of razor clams. Since you are in the US according to your profile, I am guessing you have the type from the Pacific Northwest, which look like this (picture from Washington Fish and Wildlife): It is normal for the razor clam to not completely fit into its shell; in particular, the digger or "foot" will extend from the shell. ...


6

Since the original recipe does not say explicitly that the scallops should be cooked from a frozen state, you should thaw them in the refrigerator before making the dish. Do not precook them—just thaw them, and cook them as per the recipe. You will also want to pat them dry with a paper towel or lint free towel, so that they are as dry as reasonably ...


5

Paella is a specific type of rice dish, cooked in a wide, flat pan. Although sesfood is typical, it can also be made without seafood. (I typically just do chicken and sausage) Casseroles, however, are typically a higher sided earthware or similar dish, and baked. They typically have starch, but it might be rice, noodles, or a biscuit top. They might use ...


5

i have found that a lampe berger works well to eliminate strong scents after cooking (http://www.lampeberger.us/) -- after all, they were originally invented to help reduce the odors in hospitals and mortuaries! (you can read about their history at wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragrance_lamp). i use mine after a night of deep frying food to get ...


5

Probably not the kind of answer you are hopping for, but in my case what my dad (he loves fish, mom and sisters dont) ended up doing was buying a second electric toaster-oven and just use an extension and cook it in the backyard... :S I guess you could use an electric or gas camping stove too. If there is no backyard... maybe rooftop? Other than that its ...


5

Scallops are like little sponges. Don't let 'em soak in water, or they'll absorb a ton of it and then release it all when you start cooking them. If you need to wash them, put them in a strainer, and run them under the water for a second. Then pat them dry with some paper towels.



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