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54

First, there is no difference between seasoning and reseasoning, unless you need to do some extra work to remove rust (see instructions below). In fact, for new cast iron, scouring is also usually a good idea since you need to get off whatever wax or protective oil the manufacturer or seller may have put onto the cookware. (They don't use cooking oil for ...


36

See this excellent article about the chemistry of seasoning. You want flaxseed oil (which incidentally has a low smoke point) but a high iodine value, allowing it to polymerize readily. I read so many blogs about oil "impregnating the cast iron," but this doesn't make any sense chemically. What happens is that the oil polymerizes, and you want an oil that ...


16

There are two parts to this question, the stated part, and the unstated "are you really frying an egg if there is no oil?" For the first part, most manufacturers of non-stick pans claim that their product makes oil unnecessary, and generally I've found that to be true. A little oil helps, but "necessary" might be a stretch. To maximize your non-stickyness ...


14

Make sure to seriously wash the wok before initial use. Scrub it with hot soapy water and dry thoroughly. After drying, place the wok over the stove on high heat until it starts to smoke. Rotate the pan so that all parts of the inside are exposed to high heat. Then rub the wok with oil on a paper towel. After this, try not to scrub the wok. A rinse and ...


12

Purpose of Seasoning protect bare cast iron from rust make the pan surface non-stick How often to season the pan? You'll need to season it more when it's new. Use it frequently and you'll need to season it less often. Don't cook beans or tomatoes in it at first; if you do so later, you may want to re-season it. Regarding adding butter, you're ...


11

I personally had never heard of it, but after doing some research online, I found another set of instructions that called for boiling potatoes in the pan before seasoning: After boiling potato peelings for 15 minutes, the skillet had a nasty slurry of grey looking sand in the bottom Once the skillet was heated, the pores were opened, and the ...


9

This coating is not the same thing as a seasoning. Iron rusts when exposed to air. For cooking purposes, you season it, and it prevents rusting. Some manufacturers sell their iron cookware pre-seasoned, but others use other types of coating to prevent rust. This other coating can consist of wax or petroleum products such as parafin. Its only purpose is to ...


8

According to Yahoo!7: To season a pan, preheat your oven to 300°F (150°C). Preheat the pan on the stove top. When warm, coat the inside surfaces of the pan with vegetable oil or lard. Continue to heat just until you see ripples appear on the surface of the oil. At this point, pour off any excess oil, give it a quick wipe with a folded paper towel ...


8

I've never heard of milk being used to season a pan and so I am a little skeptical of it. Pan seasoning is always done with fat that is heated until it polymerizes. This creates a very hard non-stick surface that makes cooking easier and protects the pan from rust. See this question for more about how to season your pan: What's the best way to season ...


8

Personally, I'd just season the pan a couple times to cover the spot; it seems excessive to strip off all the other seasoning and start from scratch unless the pan is really deeply rusted. Other people may feel differently, of course; there are as many opinions about caring for cast-iron as there are people that own it.


8

AFAIK you need to heat the pan to let the oil oxidize and polymerize¹ so that it will form a chemically protective and non-sticking coating. If you wash your cookware with soap you will have to do it every time. For that reason some people don't wash cast iron at all and wipe it with a clean cloth or paper towel after using. (Burned oil is apparently not ...


7

This question has been answered several times as part of more general questions about seasoning. See the (closely) related links in the related questions list. This one in particular: What's the best way to season a cast iron skillet? Specifically about oil- you want to use an oil that has a high iodine value: ...


7

Do you need to remove a bunch of burnt-on stuff as well as the season? If the pan is clean but not rust-resistant or non-stick like you want, I'd suggest just treating it like you were doing it for the first time and just season over the old. It's not like you care about hurting the old season--you'll just be thickening it and filling in gaps. If you need ...


7

Personally I just re-season it by cleaning it well, covering the cooking surface in a frying oil and heating it until it just starts to smoke. This has always worked extremely well for me, and has the advantage of being quick if you need to actually use the thing right away!


6

The more important part may be how not to unseason the pan. You can never, ever, clean it with soap. Or scrape it with brillo. Just warm/hot water and cloth. Seasoning is literally "greasing" the pan. And soap is the enemy of grease. Good when washing your hands. Bad when cleaning cast-iron. This creates a bit of a catch-22 since a poorly seasoned pan ...


5

if you find you have things stuck to the inside of the wok that you might be tempted to try and scrub off, you can instead flip the wok upside down over the flame and allow the deposits to be burnt off. Once they have been burnt for a while the ash should come off easily with a wipe (don't forget to let the wok cool first!) and this helps avoid the ...


5

Does it impart flavor onto the food? Not necessarily. The seasoning helps to develop a good sear on the food, and this adds to the flavor. If the seasoning is very old or if the pan is cleaned infrequently, then some flavor may come from the cook top. Old diner often attribute the flavor of their burgers to the grill that has been in place for the last 60 ...


5

I've never heard of such a thing. As one who has seasoned a few cast iron pans, I can tell you that you don't need the potato peals. Just coat it with oil and bake it. Here's one of the first hits I got on Google. That's all you need to do.


5

I don't think those are "cracked ridges"; I think you have a hammered wok. The appearance is an artifact of how they are manufacted, by hammering a steel blank into a form or mold. It probably is a carbon steel wok, as that is the most common material used for the hammering method as far as I know. According to this article at The Kitchn, you should ...


5

No. Neither plain stainless steel nor non-stick pans (which yours is as it's coated with Teflon) need to be seasoned. Not only is seasoning unnecessary, but it will only cause your pan to look dirty. It would do no good at all. Seasoning is all about preventing rust and sealing "pores", making the surface more resistant to sticking. Neither of those things ...


4

From what you're describing, you probably just need to clean it (maybe a little scrub; I use some coarse salt and oil) and re-season, not fully strip it ... ... but you have a nasty, disgusting pan ... the sort of thing that's found when cleaning out someone's barn or otherwise neglected for years, first start with: self clean cycle of an oven fireplace ...


4

You don't. I've tried to do this. It doesn't work. The problem is that the induction hob heats a cast iron pan to very hot temperatures, even on the lowest setting. And when it doesn this, it doesn't heat evenly, you get a coil-shaped hot spot. We have had a question about seasoning cast iron on stovetop, and somebody reported good results provided ...


4

Although I can't lay claim to what exactly is "normal," I can say that on the occasions that I wipe the cast-iron pan which I use for basically everything on a near-daily basis with a paper towel, it never comes back free of some kind of residue (usually more of a dark brown for me), even after I've cleaned it in the way you describe. I've been using my ...


4

You may notice the black residue if you fry eggs in the pan as well. Most likely, the black residue is charred (greasy) food sticking to the seasoned oil. Since Flaxseed oil has low heat tolerance, it could be that disintegrating, too. Otherwise it could be related to the iron in the cast iron which isn't bad for you (some say even good). a) Is it ...


3

One important rule is to season your skillet (or especially, your wok), if you can see the unseasoned metal of your pan at any time. If you've just made a dish and wiped the pan off and notice there's no coating on part of it, season it while the skillet is still hot.


3

From personal experience, I have seasoned my Lodge cast iron skillet recently following the process described here and I achieved good results with basic Crisco, which is more or less Canola oil. So far so good: no sticking and great tasting results. I went through the process five times, but I think that may have been a little overboard. Perhaps someone ...


3

Wow, I am going to say no. I haven't research it that mush but my guess is it is a bad idea. Aluminum pans are cheap, I would just pick up a new one. But to really answer your question. I don't really think you will be able to season an aluminum pan. I have a couple that I saute and pan fry with all the time that, even if I wasn't trying to ...


3

I don't think you will hurt the pan, cast iron skillets can take a lot of heat. I think the biggest risk is that you are building a kind of dangerous tower. If you were to somehow knock it over you could hurt yourself badly.


3

Heat your oven to around 350F. Coat the pan with some sort of fat (vegetable oil works well), bake for at least an hour, and wipe. You're done! Re-seasoning is similar to seasoning, as you say. To reduce the need for re-seasoning, make sure you're only cleaning with hot water (and possibly salt).



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