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28

The notion that salt or spices specifically don't scale linearly sounds like nonsense to me. In any recipe involving salt and water, the salt is dissolved, so all that matters is the concentration, and that concentration is going to be the same with linear scaling. Scaling in general is problematic when scaling more than 2x or 4x. When you take into ...


22

Salt is perhaps the most basic and effective flavour enhancer, and so it's fairly obvious why we have it on our dinner tables. The popularity of pepper is down to the Romans, who were crazy about it. Thanks to the longevity of the Roman Empire, pepper was imported for hundreds of years, helping to establish it as the most popular spice, and keeping the ...


20

My best recommendation is to taste as you go. Taste the initial product...raw vegetable, ingredient from the can, bottle, etc. and then continue to taste and sample a dish throughout the cooking process to see how flavors develop/diminish and enhance one another through the cooking process. Learning to season food is a process of educating your palate and ...


18

Salt has unique properties in how it interacts with the taste buds. While it has its own "flavor" it also has the ability to enhance some flavors while blocking your ability to experience others. While I could go on, all I would be doing is repeating much of what I learned watching The Food Network's Alton Brown. He goes in depth for the episode "The ...


16

You take a small amount out, cook it and taste it. It is the classic way, for instance, to know if sausage is going to be good after it is cooked but before you put it into casing.


15

Summary for the Quick Reader Only the shape and size of the grains really makes a difference. Otherwise, salt is salt. What makes a difference between salts? There are only two real differentiators between different types of salt (assuming the product is essentially just salt, and not a seasoning blend): The mineral or other impurities resulting from ...


13

I cannot imagine that sanding and buffing a wooden spoon would have any useful culinary applications, although I suppose it might feel smoother to the touch. Generally when you season something wooden for food preparation, the purpose is to create a protective layer to avoid warping or impregnation. If I really wanted to season a spoon, I would season it ...


12

Orange zest is where most of the oil is. This can be removed with a grater and some patience, or a peeler if you have a light touch, but the best way is a zester. They are fairly expensive and only do one thing, but they are the best tool for the job. Mircoplane makes a nice line, and I have no complains about mine. You want to avoid scraping the white pith ...


11

I've never heard of doing anything other than giving it a good cleaning, as you would with any new item before first use. I've only heard of seasoning used for cast iron and carbon steel, not for stainless steel. Looking online, I did find instructions for seasoning stainless steel, but I'd be inclined to look at the paperwork that came with the pan -- if ...


11

One thing we have found that helps in adding flavor during the steaming process is to slice garlic thinly, and line the bottom of the steamer basket with the garlic. Then afterwards, toss the garlic in with the potatoes and add salt/pepper/etc. (I'd probably add paprika, onion powder, and a pinch of cayenne.) I would imagine orange or lemon peel might work ...


11

Well, for a start it's not really goulash without paprika. Having visited Hungary numerous times I'd also say it's not really goulash with ground meat, turkey sausage, corn, egg noodles, salsa or cheese either, but each to his/her own. Thyme is always nice in stew-style dishes, as is a bay leaf. Other than that just salt and pepper.


10

It is going to be hard to get a lot of seasoning to penetrate during steaming, though you could add some aromatics like ginger to the water if you like. A better bet is to add a flavorful sauce after serving. Chimichurri or chermoula would both be excellent with potatoes. They contain some olive oil, but even small amounts of them will make the dish much ...


10

Not only does salt affect the taste of baked goods, it reacts with the dough chemically to slow the action of leaveners, and to change the texture. Here's a brief synopsis, which discusses how salt has an effect on water absorption, as well : http://www.progressivebaker.com/resources/tips_effects_of_salt.shtm


9

Definitely taste as you go and season gradually and regularly. Good chefs might taste their dish thirty times before it gets to the plate. Proper seasoning is not a formula, it's heat-seeking missile that constantly adjusts to hit its target. Or an impressionist painter who builds a base of color and then dabs on highlights and shadow to bring out the ...


9

To get more flavor out of cumin, you can use whole seeds, and toast them briefly in a pan before grinding. If you don't want to put forth that extra effort, you'll just need to add more cumin. If it's not salty enough, the best solution is to just add more salt (sorry). Salt will enhance the other flavors as well. A bit of cornstarch would help make the ...


8

We have been eating turkey burgers for years. The super secret is to not let them dry out while cooling. I take a pound of ground turkey, mixed 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 2 shakes garlic powder and 1/2 teaspoon of water. Then mix thoroughly by hand. After patty-ing them to 1/4 inch thick patties, I grill for about 5-6 ...


8

Penzeys (a spice co.) makes theirs from: salt, black pepper, paprika, Turkish oregano, cayenne pepper, garlic, celery, Mexican oregano, basil, nutmeg, cumin, marjoram, thyme and rosemary. No numbers are given, and you probably don't need two kinds of oregano, but I've made it before with a similar list, and it is generally insensitive to precise ratios. ...


8

One option to consider to add flavour to a chicken is brining. I've personally never brined a chicken, but everytime I come across mention of it in a foodie blog, forum or elsewhere, it always seems to be considered a good way to impart additional flavour into the meat.


8

I don't season the wood at all. I buy the planks from the local grocery store or hardware store and soak in water for 8 hours. The planks often say 1 hour is enough, but I think this is just marketing, it never seems to be enough. Weighting the plank down to keep it fully submerged will help the process. When you're ready to cook, put the plank on a hot ...


8

Draining all of the fat will most certainly reduce flavor...so my first choice would be to keep some of it in the pan. Use it to heat up your spices and don't add any water. That is definitely lowering flavor impact. If you need to add a liquid, why not try some beef stock?


8

There are several reasons why you should marinate before cooking: Many marinades contain raw ingredients that should be cooked along with the food being marinated, such as garlic or ginger. In some cases this may actually be a health hazard (raw garlic can harbor botulism), in other cases you'll simply end up with an undesirable pungent flavour. Many ...


8

You can combine it with practically everything, so the question is somewhat broad. So my answer is equally broad: rice pairs well with fresh tastes and acidity, or with moderately sweet components. Or you can just underline its own slightly nutty notes. Below is a list of specific examples, but it is impossible to make it exhaustive. For fresh tastes, use ...


8

Since cooking the pasta in salted water is essential, and switching to fresh water or whatever is a PITA, I'd just use less water and thicken with something else. The standard ratio for salting pasta water is 1:10:100 - 1 litre of water for 10g salt and 100g pasta - perhaps you're over-salting the water?


7

There are almost two separate schools of thought on this. One is using seasonings and sauces to enhance and balance the flavor of the original ingredients, but that the original ingredients are still the primary flavor of the dish. The other is using seasonings and sauces, to create an end result where the original ingredients are no more than a few notes in ...


7

If you're adding inordinate amounts of herbs with no effect, then that sounds to me like a problem with the herbs themselves. If you're using dried herbs, they could just be too old. To me, dried basil and oregano and marjoram just never taste like much. Fresh, however, they're quite strong. Tarragon, chervil, and dill, on the other hand, do "work" in ...


7

Hamburgers are beef. Buy meat from a source that you trust, and taste them raw :) EDIT in response to OP comment: Food borne pathogens can be insidious; cooking them to death is one way to handle them; another way is risk management to avoid bringing them into the kitchen at all. Pork is traditionally required to be cooked because of Trichinella ...


7

Spices can sometimes taste different when their context(other spices and foods) or preparation is altered. Other than trying known recipes, I occasionally taste an unfamiliar spice in several states over a period of time: raw in cheek for a little while Infused (like tea). Try some plain, some with salt, and some with sugar, (an acid like lemon juice or ...


7

By grinding it, you are also increasing the surface are of the herb when it reaches the tongue, and you are exposing the raw/inner (bitter) flavors of the herb to the mouth. When cooking with it "un-ground", the cooking process extracts just the oils from the herb, and leaves the leaf in tact which does not taste unpleasant to the senses. I would certainly ...


7

You have four immediate options as I see it: Lightly season the chili, remove a portion for your child, then season the rest to your liking Lightly season the chili, then serve it with additional accompaniments to adjust it to your liking (eg, hot sauces) Season the chili to your liking, but serve it with something to help cut the flavor for the child ...


7

Adding flavors to the water will not transfer to the vegetables. Steam is a poor medium for flavor as water carries almost nothing with it when it becomes gas. There are a few very good methods to add some flavor to steamed veggies, so you can just use one of those! You can add herbs and other aromatics to the veggies This works best with fresh herbs, but a ...



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