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5

There is no need to cook it, it's fine to eat straight out of the grinder. It's just green, black and pink peppercorns with dried garlic, salt and dried onion (ingredient list from Amazon).


0

My short answer would be no. If you wish to unlock the secrets of MSG, I would recommend tasting it in the raw (go to any Asian mart). To me it reminds me most of instant ramen noodle powder. The proposition that grilled mushrooms, roasted meat and otherwise hearty flavors taste like MSG is a farce. While MSG plays a role in why those foods taste so good, ...


1

Are you cooking the celery, carrots and onions before you add them to the soup? As @Stephie says, you've got a classic mirepoix in those ingredients. I like to chop them pretty finely (though a food processor gives results that are much too fine, like a paste; don't use one for this) and cook them together in a tablespoon of olive oil until the onions are ...


0

Powdered soup mix can be a little light on flavors. Fortunately, a few common spices make for great additives to your soup. Here's a few things you can try. Bay Leaf: A tried and true flavor additive to any soup. Add one or two for a little extra flavor. Bullion Cube: Sometimes the broth doesn't have quite enough flavor, and adding a proper bullion ...


7

This may not be your issue, but the number one problem that cooks have is in the area of salt. Soup needs a lot of salt unfortunately or it tastes bleh and insipid.


2

I'm going out on a limb here and assume that using heavy cream might have dulled the percieved intensity of the flavours. So to add more "omph" you should add more of what is already in there. As the soup is done, you can't use anything that requires a long cooking time because you'd be turning everythinhg to mush. Granted, you could cut more vegies, ...


4

My first instinct was no way, remembering that the branches and leaves contain a high amount of thujone, which is a neurotoxin and not without risks, especially if used over a long time or while pregnant. This is the same stuff that caused absinthe to be discredited for decades. But Thuja oils typically contain 40% α-thujon, sage (salvia officinalis) up to ...


1

Well it was used to make a medicinal tea and tinctures. I don't know if I would want to use it as a seasoning, at least not regularly but if there are no reported hazards, I would think it's safe. I would do more research before committing to that idea though. Assuming it's safe, I would think anything that would benefit from an evergreen facet (like ...


10

Well, you could make your own onion powder. It isn't that difficult. Peel and finely chop your onions. Then, spread the onion pieces out on a tray and heat in a 150°F degree oven or in a food dehydrator until dry. Tip: The onions are dry when you can easily crumble the chopped pieces in your hand. Allow the onions to cool. Then, ...


4

Yeast extract contains a high content of glutamic acid, which, together with salt, forms MSG - hence the Umami taste. It's a flavour enhancer. As MSG has been the focus of many health / nutrition scares and blamed for "everything" from cancer to obesity, using yeast extract allows a manufacturer to avoid writing "MSG" and still have it in the food. -> Even ...


5

Yeast extracts provide umami, so it's a flavor enhancer. In the burger joint context, I imagine you might think it makes things taste a bit more meaty. The most famous yeast products are things like marmite and vegemite, but it doesn't have to be that intense. And since it's pretty easy to produce and can be dried into a powder, it's a common ingredient. ...


3

You should add the seasoning at the end of cooking the rice. Actually normally I let my rice cool down for 10-15 minutes and transfer it to a large mixing bowl before mixing the seasoning with my rice. I do not think it matters when you add the salt BUT the wet ingredients (including sugar) should be added after the water has been absorbed by the rice.



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