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1

Bar Akiva, you are very lucky as this is a really easy problem to solve: just don't use sausage in your ragu! Traditional ragus don't have sausage at all. The usual recipes call for minced beef or minced calf meat as a primary ingredient; to it you can add a quantity of minced pork to add more flavour (by adding fat), balancing on your taste between 50% ...


3

If you have not already looked, check the vegetarian section of where-ever you get groceries. At least here in the USA there are several varieties of Italian "sausage" that are entirely meat free and kosher. YMMV, but I find them to be an entirely satisfactory substitute.


11

By "Italian Sausage" I think you mean the seasoned pork sausage available in many supermarkets throughout the US. I've found that a 30-70 mix of beef and turkey/chicken works reasonably well as a substitute when pork is not available. Beef is too strong a flavor and turkey too weak in its own. Flavor-wise most italian sausage has red wine, fennel, and ...


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You can soak them in water for awhile then rinse out some of it out. Can do two three times. Or boil it out however this might make them tougher.


1

Besides the issues with contamination, a good tight seal helps to contain any sloshing when you're moving the container around. This reduces the chance of spashing brine when intentionally moving the container, or when pushing it out of the way to get to something behind it. A minute or so of prevention can save you a significant amount of time in cleaning ...


1

It helps prevent contamination from outside sources. You don't want nasties in your brine anymore than you do in your fresh salad.


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Salt adds flavor and causes chemical changes in food. The sooner you add salt more time salt has to penetrate the food and the longer the chemical changes have to work. Whether that's desirable or not depends on the effect you want. Here are a few examples: When boiling potatoes if you add salt at the beginning of cooking the salt flavor will get through ...


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Salt is sometimes used to modify how moisture is drawn from aromatics while they are being sauteed, taking advantage of the fact that salt "wants" to be dissolved in water but is insoluble in oil, eg adding salt upfront to get onions to brown more quickly.


1

Salt is very soluble in water, and during the cooking process will tend to diffuse within the liquids of the food and permeate inside. Having a salty flavor throughout the food I find tends to help curb salt usage. A good example is pasta, where if you add salt you can achieve a salty taste for the pasta and largely decrease salt you add at the table. My ...



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