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16

Fennel and caraway are relatives, but not the same plant. Fennel seeds have a flavor dominated by anise/licorice, where caraway is quite different, being dominated by other flavors. They also have subtle differences in appearance. Cumin, anise, and dill are other look-alike seeds with very different flavors. Anise and fennel have very similar flavors, and ...


14

I let mine dry after washing, then toss them in oil, sprinkle with salt, and then roast on a sheet pan I also make sure to get in there and stir them a few times during roasting, to be sure that they all get exposed to the heat, and on both sides.


11

Um, no. You can even buy them. The only common potentially dangerous seeds I know of belong to almonds, apples, apricots, peaches, plums, cherries, and other stone fruits. These contain a cyanide and sugar compound known as amygdalin. When metabolized it breaks down into hydrogen cyanide (HCN). In all cases the toxin is inside the seeds and will not be ...


11

By using a dehuller machine. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hegzzj9Rzk or http://www.buhlergroup.com/global/en/products/dehuller-dgba.htm How does a dehuller work? I don't know, but it seems that Google does: The most popular decorticator for sunflower is proposed by the B├╝hler Cie. It consists in a rotating blade that propels the seeds by ...


8

There are a couple common ways to deal with seeds in berries: Use a food mill, which uses a rotating blade to crush the berries and force them through small holes. They're designed for this sort of thing - removing seeds or large pieces of pulp. Do what the food mill does, but by hand: push them through a reasonably fine strainer/sieve. Unless they're ...


7

Describing the only method I know, and hoping that somebody will come up with an improvement, because this one is quite time-consuming. First, clean your pumpkin seeds and toast them. They cling to the hull when they are raw. When toasting, it is preferable to use lowish temperature for a long time, so you can prevent strong taste changes and burning. If I ...


6

I found a method here: http://www.heritagefarms.com/recipies/recipie_pages/roasted_pumpkin_seeds.php To hull seeds in quantity, first break them up with a rolling pin, hammer or food chopper, then drop the seeds into a large container filled with water. Stir vigorously to bring all the kernels in contact with the water and to break the surface tension. ...


6

Be sure and roast them in a single layer, and keep going until they are golden brown, tossing occasionally. If they are soggy, you probably just aren't cooking them long enough to drive off all of the water.


6

Be sure not to crowd them on the pan when roasting.


6

There are a few seeds which are good to eat. These generally get sold in the supermarket (pumpkin seeds, apricot kernels). If you buy the fruit containing them, you can keep the seeds. If you want to store them, you should dry them first. Spread the cleaned seeds in a single layer on paper and put it in a warm dry place (not in direct sunlight), and wait a ...


6

I'm guessing that you should be able to simply add it wherever you would add some sort of grain or flour. The wikipedia article mentions: Other uses include gluten-free baking, where ground psyllium seed husks bind moisture and help make the bread less crumbly. If you add some to your Nutraloaf, if it's enough to have an effect, it'll help it bind ...


6

I'd stew the raspberries down with a little water (and sugar if the raspberries aren't sweet) until they're very soft, then pass the whole thing through a sieve to remove the seeds. You can then either store the result in the fridge, or pour it into an ice cube tray for easy portioning and a nice cold smoothie.


5

The tricky thing with flax seeds is to grind them fine enough. I've found that my coffee grinder, for example, won't do the job because the seeds have a very hard coat. You can buy vacuum packed pre-ground meal and that may be a good option. Once you have ground flax seeds, they can be added in small amounts to baked goods very easily. Adding say 1/4 to 1/2 ...


5

Some pomegranate varieties produce pink or white seeds so yours sounds perfectly normal. I have had white seeds and they are as delicious as the red ones. Go for it.


5

I could not find any credible sources indicating that flax seeds (also known as linseed) loose significant nutritional benefits after been smashed, crushed or ground. This article from Mayo Clinic in fact indicates that since the seeds tend to pass undigested, it is better to grind them: Most nutrition experts recommend ground flaxseed because your body ...


5

I have had always success with sprouting fenugreek seeds that were bought as a spice. And an Indian friend of mine regularly grows fenugreek for leaves from the seeds bought for cooking. The seeds sold for cooking are whole (intact) seeds - they are quite hard and therefore difficult to break and damage. But I can not really say what percentage of the seeds ...


4

Dark sesame seeds are more common in Indian cooking. I personally think that they have a more intense taste. They are also smaller, for what little difference that makes. I wouldn't rush to use them to make tahini, because the color would be surprising and I suspect that the flavor would be a bit bitter.


4

They are related, but not the same plant. Wikipedia also calls Caraway "meridian fennel", which hints as to how related they are. According to Wikipedia, Caraway is in the Apiaceae family, along with anise, fennel, cumin, licorice-root, and coriander.


4

In Northern India, we eat Musk Melon and Water Melon seeds. In fact they are used like nuts. We make sweet dish too. The de-kernelling process is done by hand at home, which is quite lengthy. We deseed melon. Put the seeds to dry for approximatively 2 days; with fingers or tweezers, break the kernel and get the yummy seed. Of course, it can be stored for ...


4

I spent a couple of hours in front of the television splitting dried pumpkin seeds with an exacto knife. Make sure you don't point the business end at yourself or the fingers that are holding the seed. Ended up with about a cup full of seeds. If you have the time that seemed to work the best for getting whole raw seeds which are better for you. I decided ...


4

Any seed that has been damaged, cut, smashed, or ground starts to lose flavour, texture, nutrition, and eventually will go rancid due to oxidising oils Four hours is too short a time for anything noticeable to happen. Some types of nuts and seeds show a noticeable change over a day or two, but most take many days or weeks Milled flax seed is reasonably ...


4

They're certainly edible, but you might have to work for it. A Western view from Purdue CropINDEX: Tamarind seeds have been used in a limited way as emergency food. They are roasted, soaked to remove the seedcoat, then boiled or fried, or ground to a flour or starch. Roasted seeds are ground and used as a substitute for, or adulterant of, coffee. ...


3

Centrifugal dehullers are used commercially; something like this. Basically, you use a spinning rotor to throw seeds at a hard wall at about 100 mph (45 m/s). This cracks the shell, and releases the seed. All that reamains then is to separate seed from broken hulls. The same process may be used effectively for oats, rice, sunflower, pumpkin and etc. seeds. ...


3

The rules are the same as keeping rice, beans, or lentils: keep them in a container that the insects can't chew through, and do not allow them access. This means glass, thick plastic (not a bag), or metal. I would do my best to dry off the seeds to prevent mold growth, beforehand. Even laying them on a paper towel for 15-20 minutes should help. If you ...


3

Dark ones are perfects for Sushi and other Japanese dishes (I've tried to substitute them with golden ones, but disappointingly the flavor was not as good as with dark ones).


3

If the flaxseed appears to be small brown pieces (like 'hundreds and thousands') then it has to be ground before it can be used. I use an ordinary food processor to do this - the same attachment for grinding coffee beans or creating sugar powder. The result is a light brown powder. This should be stored in an air-tight container to prevent oxidation. The ...


2

Also make sure you're comparing types of seeds not just their preparation. "Brown" sesame seeds may merely be roasted. They have a nuttier flavor, almost like popcorn.


2

If you just need the pulp (for pie, ice cream, jam, etc...) then cook them down and run them through a food strainer. If you need them raw, or halved/skins on, then find a good audiobook...


2

I soak mine in salt water for about an hour or two (i've left them overnight at times and they're fine, but more salty) Then I lay spread them on a parchment lined cookie sheet, making sure they are single layer (not bunched up) and bake for about 30-40 minutes on 300 checking at 10 minute intervals and turning or moving them around. Before baking, I also ...


2

I worked at a grocery store for about 7 years and the number one rule when it came to bugs and weavels in the flour, seeds, rice, etc... was always the freezer. Very much to @BobMcGee's point, I would try a small amount to make sure the freezer doesn't affect them (but for most varieties, I think you're safe)



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