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12

Much agreed with Krister that simple is best. Also, to really emphasize the difference, I'd aim for larger flakes of both the 'regular' salt and the sea-salt. Here are some serving ideas. Just the salt. Side by side, on a dark plate with some small divider. A pinch of each. That's it. Broth. A very simple vegetable broth, made with a little butter ...


11

Usually a cheese tasting would have more variety in terms of texture and flavour and you'd progress from the mild to the stronger. However, if your goal is to compare a lot of similar cheeses to contrast with each other, you'll need to have more palate cleansing and balancing in between each cheese. A lot of the cheeses that you're considering are aged ...


6

I'm including links to specific recipes here, but not all of these recipes give fermenting instructions. I'm sure you could do these fermented though - as opposed to using whatever other pickling method is given. Pickled watermelon rinds are fun - spiced w/ clove, ginger, lemon, and cinnamon. Blueberries can be pickled - try with allspice, cinnamon, and ...


5

Anything elaborate makes it hard to do comparisons. You could make your own butter with different types of salt and serve with some good bread. Another option could be drinks with a salted glass rim like margaritas.


4

halloumi or feta for cheese substitutes, especially if you can get the mint halloumi cheese. as for ham substitute, I'd recommend toasted pita (served on top of the salad where you let the eater crush the bread themselves) or smoked salmon


4

I think something very basic like a slice of ripe tomato or some avacado will help showcase the flavour difference between salts. Tomato would be my choice as it responds well to salting, really bringing out the tomato flavour. You can tell the difference between the 'harsh' salting of table salt vs the mellow flavour enhancement of something like Maldon, ...


4

Perhaps digestive biscuits/oatmeal biscuits, what would be called Graham crackers in America, as something to hold under the cheese. These would give a good base without being too salty. The idea of fresh fruit is a good one, as the cheeses are hard and mostly quite salty/umami. I would add fresh figs (if you can get them) to your list. I'm not sure about ...


4

In order to create sparkling beverages, a gas called carbon dioxide (CO2) is dissolved in them, a process that goes under the name of carbonation. When dissolved in water, CO2 becomes carbonic acid (H2CO3), following the reaction: CO2 (g) + H2O <-> H2CO3 (1) The double arrow means that the reaction is reversible, that is, you can go from left ...


4

The most obvious difference is that a highball glass is much larger: 8 to 12 ounces as opposed to 4.5 ounces for a martini glass. Cocktails served traditionally in a larger glass usually include a large quantity of mixers, such as a Tom Collins (served traditionally in a Collins glass, 10-14 oz, though a highball would be appropriate), which only contains ...


3

You will want side dishes that will not overcome the taste of the lobster. Steamed or grilled asparagus with just the barest drizzle of olive oil and coarse salt immediately come to my mind. Add a nice risotto (mushroom?) then send me an invitation.


3

I'm sure someone should suggest a lightly dressed salad. I think it might go with mashed sweet potato with lots of pepper!


3

You could make a quick fried rice with eggs and some peas.. http://rasamalaysia.com/chinese-recipe-fried-rice-deluxe/


3

AB did an episode on Good Eats about Pickles a few years ago. Here is a list of his "non-dill" pickle recipes: Firecrackers Summer Fruits Hurry Curry Cauliflower Note: none of these appear to be "fermented", though.


3

I go through a lot of hot sauce, and tend to just re-use old Tabasco bottles. The main choice you need to make is what size of orifice reducer do you need. I think that the best for most thin sauces is a glass bottle with the right size reducer. You know you've got the right size when one shake of the bottle dispenses about 1/4 of the amount of sauce that ...


2

Bread and Butter Pickles Ingredients 2 1/2 lbs pickling cucumbers (fresh from the market) 1 pound white or yellow onions, thinly sliced 1/4 cup pickling salt (can use Kosher salt as a substitute, regular table salt has additives in it that will turn the pickles dark and muddy the color of the pickle juice) 1 1/4 cup white distilled vinegar ...


2

It looks like it'd be nice served on some crushed potatoes (Anya would be my choice, as they taste great and I have loads from the allotment, but any new waxy style would be good). Just boil 'em till they're just done, squash each one with the back of a fork once, put on the plate and spoon the salad on top. The potatoes will soak up the juices and make ...


2

Depending on the heat level of your sauce of course. You could make quite an impression on your guests.


2

I've had french fries with (beef) gravy and blue cheese, and it's delicious. However, if you want to get away from potatoes and aren't comfortable with roasting, what about doing some other sort of root vegetable mash? Like mash potatoes, but using turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, or sweet potato instead. I've tried them all and I think they're great. As for a ...


2

I would suggest anything that you can grab easily and is not difficult to eat. You are going to have to get dirty cracking the lobster, so why not get some corn kernels on your face? Growing up in New England our lobster dinner included sweet corn on the cob and cornbread. (The butter can be used on all of it!) Also, if you want some greens, maybe some ...


1

Bread, garlic butter, salad, maybe grilled potatoes and asparagus (not my favourite food, but the neutral taste and texture would go with the subtlety of lobster). Bread's probably essential to neutralise the fat in the butter.


1

Lobster is really popular in North Western France. I've seen it served there with crawfish cocktails and oysters; something like this. You can also just keep it down to earth and simple. In New England I used to eat lobster with french fries. Not quite worthy of Brittany, but yummy all the same.


1

Potatoes are a good choice - perhaps some roasted or parmentier-style, or even fondant potatoes. And a bit of greenery - simple wilted spinach or steamed green beans.


1

I have made Asian coleslaws multiple times, and they work very well. My main suggestion would be to heat the dressing before adding it to the slaw. Particularly if you're using scallions, the heated dressing wilts it just enough to cut some of the sharpness of the raw veggies. I'd probably make my own dressing from rice vinegar, neutral oil (such as canola) ...


1

The classic pairing would be a cucumber salad, but that's out based on your constraints. I think you probably want the same characteristics as the salad though. You want crisp and cold, but with plenty of moisture (like cucumber). Carrots would be a good idea. As you suggested in the comments, apple might be good too. I would do a fruit / veg salad, maybe a ...


1

It likely depends on how hot you make your peanut sauce, and what you consider to be a salad. You mentioned that you had chilies in your slaw (and some people consider slaw to be a salad), but if you have a very hot peanut sauce, you might want something more cooling. I once did a very nice carrot slaw (jullienned carrots, left to sit in a rice wine ...


1

I always like it when breads are served with lobster!


1

I love fried rice, as some other comments recommended. However, if you are thinking about what goes best together, that is a lot of fried stuff. Think of a Southern table with fried chicken, and to me plain white rice looks like the dish that goes with it. However, add some bits of green onion, peppers or parsley for color, some salt/butter for flavor. If ...


1

If you want to take an extra step to spruce up white rice you might want to make rice pilaf which is really quite simple. Dice one medium yellow onion and saute it with a tablespoon of olive oil. Add ground cumin and ground corrinder and stir the onion and spices over the heat for 20 seconds not to let the spices burn. Add the rice and let the rice roast in ...


1

You didn't specify if there was a certain vegetable you wanted to pickle, but my grandmother used to make excellent pickled green tomatoes, and she didn't use any dill in them that I'm aware of. It looks like most of the recipes I'm seeing online also don't include dill.



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