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9

For a fairly typical thread on this, see: http://www.thekitchn.com/cultural-differences-salad-bef-65008 The so-called reasons I see listed here are consistent with what I found in several different internet discussions of the issue, none of which are scientificially or academically credible: Restaurants serve salad first because it is easiest to get out ...


8

Eat it faster. Seriously. I am a huge fan of homemade hot fudge and much of the appeal is the contrast between the cold and the hot. Freezing your ice cream more solid will help but insufficiently heating the chocolate won't. If the fudge gets too cool it sets up into one solid chewy chunk. Perhaps your best solution would be to serve smaller portions ...


8

I don't have any direct experience to share, but it seems a little logic may be applicable. I suggest that your hot fudge is too hot and your ice cream is not icy (cold) enough. Rather than microwaving the fudge, try a hot water bath on the stove. Yeah, it's slower, but you also won't burn the bejeezus out of the sugar at the edges. Taste occasionally while ...


7

It's interesting that the two main choices you've asked about are before or after the main entrée course. In my experience in England and in continental Europe (Spain, Italy, France etc.) the salad is served as a side dish alongside the main or entrée course and is intended to be eaten alongside this course sometimes in place of some form of vegetable dish. ...


4

I think isolating the fudge could be a good way to fix this. It might complicate your dish, but it might add both to the presentation as well as to the texture of the ice cream. Try getting hold of or make your own biscuit rolls (I don't know the name). Fill these up with hot fudge. The biscuit will act as isolation keep the texture of both the ice cream ...


3

You have this same problem with most fried foods that you want to serve fresh. Anyone who makes latkes for Hanukkah knows this problem well. So it's similar to this question What technique should I use to make latkes for a party so that I don't have to stay in the kitchen? You can try what I do for latkes - I put them on a drying rack, sheet pan, ...


3

Most cakes should be served at room temperature, to maximize their flavor. This one does not sound like an exception. The ganache and buttercream should both hold well at room temperature on the day the cake is assembled (from its description, this is not a gateau that should be stored for a long time). Don't take the common restaurant practice of serving ...


3

It really depends on your audience and setting. With a Filipino Lechon, it's served communally and eaten as pulled pork, so it's expected that you'll just plunk it down on a side table, and people will crack through the crisp, almost hard, skin and pull servings for themselves with tongs or forks. And they'll go for the whole thing, skin, ears, jowls and ...


3

Trying to keep your body heat from the wine is only necessary for chilled wines (whites, for the most part). For those served at room temperature (most reds), you actually want your body heat to warm the wine. I've been to plenty of places that use 'stemless wine glasses' (about the size of a red wine glass, maybe a little larger, but no stem underneath) ...


3

Many consider salad a secondary food in the hierarchy. You can eat more meat if you skip the salad, or eat it last. If you eat salad first (without 100% fat drizzled salad dressing) you fill your stomach with fewer calories by volume. Your total caloric intake could possibly be reduced by eating salad first.


2

You set it arbitrarily, although hopefully based on some reasonable single portion size. Once you have the serving size, you calculate the nutritional information based upon it. There is some rumor of stronger regulation forthcoming in the US to make portion size claims on labels more realistic, but that is not the case at this time.


2

For the better solution, if you do enough potlucks, or even if you don't, but you need to get a baking dish, Pyrex has a line called 'Pyrex to Go' which come with a tight fitting lid, an insulated carrier, hot & cold packs. For those times when I'll need to hold things for even longer, I'll put the whole thing (insulated container and all), into a ...


2

All the cast iron pans I've got came with instructions that read along the lines of "suitable for serving, but not storage of food". I'm not sure what would suffer most though, your pan, or the food, or both, depending on length of time. My guess is that the length of time you actually can store food in a cast iron pan/pot safely somewhat depends on the ...


2

Your question is fairly difficult to answer via this forum, but I will try Cut the head off Cut the legs off and try to cut near the joint, so it will come off nicely (I must admit it's hard to describe how to do it here). The end result should be two nice pork knuckles. Cut the middle of the big where the spine is Once you cut the pig in two big parts, ...


2

One potential difference may be the color of the plate. Food on a higher contrast plate (i.e., white vs. gray) will tend to look more appealing, and will also cause you to eat less due to the Delbouef illusion.


1

For American pancakes, my mom would always warm a plate or two in the oven, and then stash them in there as they were done cooking ... but American pancakes don't suffer as much from losing a crispy edge, and you'd run the risk of them steaming. You might be able to counter this somewhat by a clean towel in between them. When I do dutch pannekoeken, which ...


1

It's a simple matter of thermodynamics. Consider the variables: temperature of ice cream, Tic temperature of fudge, Tf heat transfer coefficient, h heat transfer surface area, A I'll leave the derivation of the heat transfer equation as it pertains to sundaes as an exercise for the reader, but it's intuitive that you have a number of options, including: ...


1

My parents always enjoyed making hot fudge but had similar issues to you. So they found very small bowls and now serve the ice cream in normal sized dishes (with any additional non-melting toppings) and provide a small side dish of fudge. Two great benefits with this method. Ice cream doesn't melt/Fudge doesn't cool off as quickly. Every person gets to ...


1

There are a few factors that could effect this: 1) How the meat is cooked and how lean or fatty it is. If you overcook the meat (although I doubt that you would!) or if it's leaner or fattier. If its a fattier meat add say an extra 2 tbsps or so of sauce and if it's leaner (or overcooked) I would add a tbsp or so less of sauce. 2) The viscosity and ...


1

For bourguignonne, most of the calories are going to be in the noodles anyway. The beef amounts for bourguignonne are smallish, and the flavorings (mushroom, possibly carrot, broth, wine) are pretty much non-existent nutritionally. I would just go by mouth-feel. Cut the aubergine in amounts that approximate the texture and flavor of the original dish, and ...



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