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24

You should use both. Knives have a very thin ragged edge (the burr) that is too small to see, which gets pushed over from use, and which makes the knife seem dull. A honing steel straightens this burr out. I use a honing steel before I cook every day. Over time, the burr wears down, or can no longer be straightened. At this point, you will need to use the ...


21

The most readily evident way of determining if a knife needs to be sharpened is when you notice that you're having to apply more force than normal. When you start out with a sharp knife you will become accustomed to how it glides through food. Over time you're going to notice that you are having to apply more pressure than normal and that's when it's ...


18

I usually notice when cutting onions and tomatoes. With a very sharp knife cutting an onion doesn't cause much tears at all. As it dulls though it does more crushing than slicing which releases more gas into the air, which makes you cry more. Ripe tomatoes help because they are so tender. If it becomes difficult to slice a tomato without crushing it, your ...


17

Yes, I've heard this suggested, using wet/dry sandpaper and a mousepad. It is a very inexpensive way to match a whetstone, and you can use sandpaper with the same grit to produce an excellent edge. You duct-tape the sand-paper together so it wraps around the mouse pad, and then pull the knife along the sandpaper with the edge trailing. This is to say, you ...


14

Take them to a professional. Nothing you can affordably buy in your home will work well. Personally, I don't buy quality serrated knives. I buy cheap and replace when dull. Only my normal blades are quality, and these I have sharpened yearly.


11

Allow me to help you fast forward through my years of pain trying to get my knives sharpened. I looked all over to find a local sharpening service. I called fancy restaurants, chain restaurants, and restaurant supply stores. I found one who said they performed the service and promptly had three knives really scratched up. I tried doing the sharpening ...


8

I usually hold up a single sheet of newspaper and poke the point of the knife through. If you can make a downward cut without the paper tearing, the knife is sharp.


8

If you have top quality knives, I generally discourage the use of any do-it-yourself sharpeners. I take my knives yearly to a professional knife sharpener who puts that amazing 17 degree edge back on my Shun knives. In between sharpening you should be using a quality honing steel every time you use your knife. Additionally, your knives shouldn't need ...


7

Oh absolutely, you certainly don't want to sharpen a kitchen knife on a 200 grit stone! You'll want one medium stone in case you ever need to remove a nick or something (but then you should probably take your knife to a pro at that point), and then probably like 2000-4000-6000 grits for routine polishing. (Note Japanese grit numbers are different than ...


7

I'd recommend checking with a reputable cookware/cutlery store in your area for a recommendation--ideally a local one, as they're more likely to have recommendations than a big national chain (though places like Sur La Table may still have some). You might also check with restaurants in your area--some of them might have a service they use.


6

I bought my (Chinese) whetstone for 7,5€ and I've used it for the last 20 years. You could spend some money on a honing steel, but even these are not really expensive. I got mine for free at a fair, and it receives regular action. Make sure you buy cheap vanadium steel knifes for your kitchen (shameless self-promotion).


6

The Japanese Knife Company has a couple of good tutorials on their website. http://www.japaneseknifecompany.com/VIDEOS/tabid/234/Default.aspx


5

really rough stones (used for tools) aren't suitable for knives. they can be used to remove chips, but really require a skilled hand to not damange the knife. most knives are sharpened with japanese waterstones (most easily available & cheap). you'll do most of your sharpening with something around a 1500 grit. if you want a real fine edge (e.g. for ...


5

I take mine to the local sewing store. They have someone come in once a month to sharpen sissors. I talked to the guy he also does knifes. I took him one of my old cheap chefs knifes first and was pleased with the result so now he gets my good ones too.


5

I worked with a 60+ year old chef who had been using the same knife since he started his apprenticeship at age 15 (no exaggeration). Over the decades he had worn away at least 1cm of blade width by sharpening and honing but it was still completely functional.


5

You will not be able to sharpen it with a steel as per Ching Chong's answer. You will be able to sharpen it with a couple of sharpening stones. If the blade is totally blunt you will need a reasonably coarse one to bring the edge back, and a finer one to refine the edge. Then you can strop it on the steel or the back of a leather belt to remove the burr. ...


5

Depends on the stone. If it's a countertop wetstone, then you want to angle the blade slightly, while you pull and slide outwards. You never want a purely straight pull. If it's a handheld micro-sharpener, then (while holding the blade at the sharpener designated angle) out and up, minding your fingers and wrist. If it's a sharpening steel, there's a ...


4

It will really be down to each individial company. Be specific about the type of knife when you enquire and when you drop it off for sharpening, get a receipt/job sheet detailing that, and specify the one-sided sharpen: 'Japanese knife, sharpen one side only'. That way you have some comeback if they f%^& it up.


4

Absolutely. A honer, or even better a sharpening steel removes a minuscule amount of material. Or knife will last a lifetime. The honer only realigns the blade, it doesn't remove material and reestablish a true bevel. Eventually, you'll use the honer and it won't do anything, thats when you use the sharpener. Realize though, that the electric ...


4

If you're using cheap knives (which you suggest to the answer you linked to, and I admit, I have quite a few), feel free to sharpen them yourself ... I have both a stick-style diamond dust sharpener, and a set of whet stones. But I don't sharpen my good kitchen knives myself, and I tend to go a few years between sharpenings (but I also have two chef knives ...


4

Learn from the masters :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5opGmTnaxg&feature=related http://www.fine-tools.com/G10002.htm http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZj0I3mpBGg&feature=related


4

While you can learn how to sharpen on almost any straight blade knife, my recommendation is to start on one that: Isn't expensive, (try yard sales, thrift stores, and pawn shops) Isn't very long, (6 inches max) Is wide enough that wearing the blade away won't be a big issue, (chef's knife would be fine) Is not too thin or too thick, (not a boning knife or ...


4

You could theoretically pop the blade out of the handle and try and run it over some sharpening stones (by no means easy with the odd shape), but considering that would take time, effort, and at least a £5 sharpening stone, you're probably better off just dropping £1.50 on a new peeler.


4

Depending on the type of honing rod and the technique you use for honing, you will remove more or less metal from the blade. You can confirm whether your rod removes metal by wiping the blade on a white tea cloth after honing. If you see a grey residue on the cloth then metal has been removed and you can decide yourself whether you want that in your food. ...


4

How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a video from Chefs Armoury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TPDgdo7jfM 1. Prep your stones Depending on what stones you use, you may need to soak or not. I use the Naniwa stones that just ...


3

There's the old boy-scout test where you see if it will catch on your fingernail. It's not exactly sanitary for commercial kitchens, but if it tacks on your nail, you're golden!


3

dmckee is right - that you can use a rod & file to fix - but that's a HUGE pain and very difficult to do. not preferred unless absolutely necessary. michael has a point, that some electric sharpeners allow you to hone serrated edges. this is because those machines use a flexible rubber wheel on the honing stage. this doesn't correct misaligned ...


3

If you're looking around your house for stuff you already own to sharpen your knife on, the story goes that the underside of a dinner plate is the way to go. I've never done it - I bought stones from Lee Valley many years ago and I have a steel, and between them I'm taken care of.


3

Standard grooved metal steels don't ever really become unusable. The ridges will get dinged up over time with abuse, especially with cheap steels that are not of good quality; however, I've seen some seriously (ab)used steels and they are still quite usable despite looking like Rocky at the end of a fight. In the worst case, the steel will become smooth... ...


3

Sort of. There's a trick to fix up peeler edges: rub the back side of a paring knife along the blade, at roughly the same angle as the peeler blade's edge. Use the tip of the knife if needed. You may need to do this with both sides of the peeler blade. I suspect the result is closer to honing the edge, but the trick works well enough that I haven't bought ...



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