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22

You should throw them out. Mussels that don't open were quite possibly dead and decomposing for an unknown period of time prior to cooking. You don't want to take a chance here. Just in case future readers don't know, mussels, clams, and other in-shell shellfish are still alive when you buy them, and they should be still alive when you cook them.


12

In the future, I would recommend the following: When washing the mussels before cooking, if any are slightly open try gently closing them. If they react by snapping closed themselves or they stay shut, it means the mussels are alive and well. If instead they react by immediately popping back open, throw them out (they are dead). I've found that the ...


8

Most people I know who cook scallops actually overcook them. I always buy sushi-grade diver's scallops from my fishmonger. These can be eaten raw, and are most delicious when done so. However if you want to add a little extra flavor, and liven up the appearance of these then sear these briefly on a high heat. If you can get these from a quality source ...


8

This is definitely a rapa whelk. These are indigenous to the seas in the far East, but got somehow imported into the Black Sea and overtook the ecosystem. First, people around the Black sea didn't have much use for them. The waves washed the shells of dead whelks ashore and these got crafted into souvenirs for tourists. Then, people started fishing them ...


7

They look like a species of whelk, which is a catch-all term for sea-snails. See the Wikipedia article here.


7

When mussels don't open when cooked, it means that they were dead before you cooked them. Don't eat them you risk becoming very very sick.


6

The most widely-accepted substitute seems to be various sauces made from mushrooms. I don't want to say "mushroom sauce" because most products don't have that exact name. For example: Here you have "Vegetarian Mushroom Flavored Stir-Fry Sauce" on the left, and "Premium Shitake Mushroom Flavored Soy Sauce" on the right. I'm actually not familiar with the ...


6

When you cook scallops use the fresh variety and not those that come in brine. Once you've cleaned and removed the foot, make sure they are dry or at least not dripping with water, as this will cause the oil to splash. An alternative would be to wrap a each scallop in bacon and skewer then with a cocktail stick or a sate skewer, add a little lemon juice and ...


6

use a vegetarian alternative! i just ran across these recently myself, and i am finding the idea really intriguing. not sure how they compare in flavor or texture, so your mileage may vary... http://www.vegecyber.com/cgi-bin/vege_item.cgi?detail=10416 asian cultures have figured out how to make vegetarian and mock meats of all kind, since buddhism and ...


5

Allergic reaction to shellfish is typically caused by the protein tropomyosin. Since it is present in basically all of the muscle tissue of shellfish, extraction is not possible outside of a chemistry lab. Said lab extraction would destroy the food and likely render it inedible. Update Just found this recent article which indicates that myosin and ...


5

According to a few sushi websites, red shell sushi is known as arc shell, akaki or akagai sushi. It is a type of clam that gets its red color from lots of hemoglobin in its flesh. One source Another source And the green stuff is definitely nori.


4

There is an optimal temperature to which they must be cooked, independent of method (boiling, frying, whatever). This temperature is 50 deg. C. (This is lower than safety guidelines; if you want to eliminate the foodborn illness risk, you must eat rubbery seafood). Once the inner temperature of seafood has risen above that, its proteins undergo an ...


3

Try black bean sauce. The body and color of the sauce is similar, though there are coarse bits of bean in it (where oyster sauce is usually smooth). Add a shake of fish sauce to taste. Fish sauce alone may be too thin. Most fish sauces are fermented anchovies with added salt (and maybe sugar). I just taste tested this (have all the ingredients) and ...


3

It's a type of clam (shellfish) the red bit is the "foot". The strip will be nori as @SAJ14SAJ pointed out.


2

I'm allergic to most shellfish and fish, but there's something that's part of the canning processes that has let me eat canned tuna fish. (I've been allergic since I was about 2 years old and have been eating canned tuna for many years now.) I'm guessing the similar processes in making things like fish sticks or canned crab or other heavily processed food ...


2

'You shouldn't eat mussels that don't open' is an unfounded myth. It was first mentioned in a book by the British food writer Jane Grigson in the 1970s and grew through repetition to the point that 90% of cook books mentioned it in the 1990s. The fact is, mussels that don't open after cooking are more likely to be safe than those that do. You should, ...


2

Remember that a lot of this seafood naming is odd sometimes. Prawn is often used to refer to what we used to call shrimp. In the UK I get these in brine from my local supermarket, marked "krabben im lake" or something similar ...


1

There is a tradition in southern cooking for boiling Crayfish (crawdads). Boil them in seasoned water, then tear them in half, suck out the head, and eat the tail. So this is possible for shrimp as well. I have done it and seen it done at some seafood restaurants. I don't know that the heads are ever eaten, but they do contribute to the flavor. I have ...


1

Further info: This weekend I made linguine with white clam sauce, so I tested the theory about farm-raised clams. I soaked all but 5 of them in salt water (no corn meal). I marked the shells on those 5 so I would know which were which. None of the clams had any sand, including the 5 un-soaked ones. So either the producers purge farm-raised clams, or the ...


1

According to Ask A Chef the cornmeal is not necessary. It is the salt water that actually causes the clams to purge themselves: The thought behind using cornmeal is that it is an irritant that causes the clam to "cough" and expel all sand that may be in its shell. There is also a thought that it helps to change the flavor of the meat and make ...


1

Comments in this blog comment could offer a clue to the blue color. The most relevant part says: The blue color in the liquid is due to a change in the natural chemical composition of the scallop meat during spawning. That doesn't explain the hard white stuff, but maybe it'll put you on the right track. If there's a state or university agricultural ...


1

You can also buy a shrimp version of the imitation crab--both are examples of what the Japanese call surimi. If you google "kosher imitation shrimp" you will find sources.


1

I usually see to check if the prawns have curled and turned to a faint pink from the original light shade.


1

A friend of mine (professional cook) told met to steam mussels extra hot, lid closed. In about 5' they should be open and done. They are done when they open. Don't leave them cooking any longer than necessary as they'll toughen up.


1

As far as I know, if you spray fresh live mussels with cold water they will open slightly. If they don't open, throw them out.


1

I'd suggest you have too much oil. I've found that with a non stick pan you don't really need oil, or just a smidgin. Just get the pan nice and hot put the scallop in leave it alone to sear for a couple of minutes, time will depend on the size of your scallops, then flip and finish the other side, usually for a little less time. serve with the side you ...



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