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79

Even with a whole bulb, break it into cloves. Put clove(s) on a cutting board. I usually cut off the root end of each clove. Lay a large chef's knife flat on the clove, then smack the knife to crush the clove. This breaks the skin of the clove and makes it much easier to peel.


56

The trick is that you're bruising the clove of garlic a little bit so the paper will release easier -- if you're using a bulb or less, it's not too bad to do the side of the knife press method. ... but if you're cooking up a recipe that calls for a dozen heads, there's an alternate trick: break the head into cloves put the cloves into a sealable ...


17

Dump pearl onions (with skin) into boiling water (on high heat) Bring water back to boil After 1-2 mins, take the onions out, and dump them in cold water (or ice bath) After 1-2 mins, take the onions out of cold water Take an onion, hold it between your index finger and thumb, and squeeze. The onion will pop right out of the skin. Repeat this step for each ...


8

I take a hint from TV (and my fiancee): smash each clove with the flat part of the knife until the skin breaks, then you can easily take it off. If you are peeling the whole clove, then you can just smash the whole thing with the flat part of a bigger knife (safety first) and take all the goodies out.


8

Two methods that work great. 1: Put the garlic cloves into lukewarm water and wait 20-30 minutes. 2: Put the garlic cloves into a tupperware and shake. I'd use method one for peeling large batches of garlic that you can store in the fridge for a couple of weeks, and method two for immediate use.


6

As roux said, and you alluded to, you want a piping bag of some kind. Where I find a piping bag doesn't always work the best, I've been able to steal the concept and slightly modify it by "making my own at home". Put all the filling into a large ziploc bag (I use gallon sized cause I make manicotti in bulk, but quart sized works just as well). Edit: as ...


6

Use a food processor to aerate the flour and mix other dry ingredients in. As a bonus for me, the food processor bowl can go in the dishwasher. I have to hand-wash my sifter.


6

Great video on peeling garlic. It's basically the same method as that described in Joe's answer: Smash the head, put it all (if you need a whole head of garlic) in a large metal bowl, put another metal bowl on top, but upside down, so that the rims overlap, and shake hard for several seconds.


6

I call these Garlic Cannoli. Actually, they're simply called "garlic peelers." For Christmas, I gave my wife one of these as a stocking-stuffer. I had seen them in kitchen gadget stores for years, but was always reluctant to get one, believing it was another useless, cheap gadget. I was wrong! I used to peel garlic using a knife, but now, with this, I ...


6

Fast home made salads are possible with a few different but just as tasty ingredients. Some things to try that you can buy pre-prepared You can buy catering bags of ham and salami pre-chopped for pizza making purposes. Freeze in small portion bags suitable for a few days, and take one out of the freezer and put in fridge every few days as required Roasted ...


5

If you need to keep the cloves whole, there's a nifty little tool that looks like a piece of rubber manicotti, which is specially designed for this purpose. You put a clove of garlic inside, then roll it back and forth on the counter. The clove will pop out the end completely stripped of its skin. If you don't feel like going out and buying a one-use ...


5

Actually I've found that constant stirring has little to no affect on the final product. You can simply stir rigorously at the last minute and achieve similar results. Don't believe me? Try it for yourself and you'll see. Another trick is pre-cooking your rice. Just follow a standard risotto recipe but stop cooking the rice about half way through the ...


4

Mark Bittman thinks it can be done more easily, see here. It comes with a video.


4

Looks like the closest you can get is to add lots of cheese and butter (for the cream) and stir less often. This recipe follows that trick, using the lid of your pot unlike a traditional risotto. If you have a pressure cooker, you can also coopt it to do some of the work for you, as seen in this recipe. The trick there as suggested by many similar ...


4

I built a little wooden impeller for my food processor that hits the cloves hard enough to peel them, but not hard enough to gouge or break them: The center piece is an old dough mixer blade for the food processor. The wood is maple; pine is too weak. The rubber flaps on the bottom, screwed on, keep the cloves moving so they'll collide with the wood. I've ...


3

Rather than the "smash" method, I cut a little off each end of the clove and then slice the clove in half, lengthwise. Once it is sliced, the skin peels off easily. Plus, the cut allows for the (2) slices to lay flat for mincing.


3

If you Google for "risotto oven baked" you can get a lot of recipes and comments. The general consensus is that it's not quite as creamy as the constantly stirred stove top version, but that most people would never know it wasn't made on the stove top if you don't tell them.


3

I just use a strainer. Slap something over the top so your flour doesn't fly all over the place, and shake it. It's got such a huge surface area, that it takes much less time than a lot of special purpose sifting tools (those stupid little cups with the trigger handles? What the hell is that about? The crank ones are no better. What am I? An organ grinder ...


3

You can use lasagna noodles too and just spread the filling and roll them up. I've done that and gave up trying to stuff manicotti noodles.


2

I cut a soft drink bottle in half, fill with the mixture, and use it to funnel the mixture into a sleeping cannelloni forcing the mixture with gloved hands.


2

There are shells available that can be stuffed before cooking, then are baked in the sauce. Your mileage may vary. Haven't tried it myself.


2

As both roux and stephenmcdonald mentioned, a piping bag is the way to go, as you assumed, but you often need to fill from each side, rather than just one side. (it depends on your filling ... also, it'll give you a prettier canneloni) ... but for manicotti, many places don't use tubes. They use crepes, so you don't have the trouble filling them. I've ...


2

I wonder if your sieve is too fine. When I sift flour I only need to pour the dry ingredient into the sieve and shake the sieve over a bowl. It takes a couple of minutes at most which I wouldn't call tedious. Are you doing something different?


2

If you put batches of cut kale into a ricer like the Oxo one shown below, and give it a good hard squeeze until a little of the kale juice comes out, it will make easier work of the massaging process. You should see the kale come out broken down as much as when massaged by hand. If not, squeeze again. I do it over the salad bowl to capture the juices as ...


1

I also used to find sifting a pain, but got a sifter from Tupperware last year that is fabulous - highly recommended! See http://www.tupperware.com.au/wps/wcm/connect/AUS/website/productgallery/productcollections/bakebasics/bake+2basics+sift+n+stor for details.


1

i almost never "sift," per se -- i just whisk it really well to break up lumps and aerate it a bit.


1

You can probably just leave the sifting step out. I'm lazy when making food for my own consumption, and often just dump the flour on top of the wet mix in the bowl and sift the salt/soda/whatnot in by hand a bit. Most recipes don't seem to mind, but some do (some also specify a volume of sifted flour, so that needs to be compensated for as well), so best to ...


1

you might try forcing whatever it is into the cherries. This can be done under pressure, which you might be able to do it using a fizzgizz? or maybe with a creamer, or simply by vacuum packing the cherries with the soaking liquid. once vacuum packed you might be able to put in a pressure cooker to increase the pressure, but I'm not sure what the heat would ...


1

There is one recipe for risotto that doesn't require that much attention: "Risotto alla pilota". Basically you boil the rice in salted water and then stir-fry it with a particular shredded Italian sausage meat (called "pesto", but it's not that pesto). You then add Grana or Parmigiano.



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