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15

In baking, the term "shortening" alone is used to mean any fat; "vegetable shortening" is a fat made from vegetable oil to be solid at room temperature. Most vegetable oils, such as corn oil, peanut oil, soybean oil and so on are liquid at room temperature because they are unsaturated fats: their fatty acids do not have hydrogen bound to them. Vegetable ...


8

Flakiness in pastry is usually achieved by careful incorporation of butter at the correct temperature. Cold cubes of butter are cut into the flour, cold water (or milk) is added, and then the pastry is rolled out, flattening the butter pieces. These pieces act to separate layers of the flour and liquid mixture. The butter then melts during cooking, ...


6

They don't call it vegetable shortening in India, but "Dalda" is exactly that. As @rumtscho explained, it is made from an industrial process.


5

Both will do the job of greasing a pan but there are some differences. One of the big differences is that butter will add a very desirable flavor to whatever you are cooking—which especially complements sweet baked goods. Shortening is pure fat whereas butter is only about 80% fat by weight. Butter may bring additional flavor to your recipe (even by ...


4

On first blush, you will probably want a fat or oil with similar qualities as the "vegetable" oil you're replacing, such as olive oil. Butter has a much lower a smoke point, however, cornbread recipes exist that use butter or lard. I'd be willing to experiment, particularly if you're used to cooking with butter. (Just be careful with heat.) As far as ...


4

The texture of a cookie is based on much more than the fat used, shortening or butter. In fact, within some basic limits, they are fairly interchangeable in most cookie recipes, flavor not withstanding. Switching to part or all vegetable shortening will not yield a flaky texture. The method by which the ingredients are combined, and how the cookies are ...


3

This can have different reasons. How long did you mix it? The transition between grainy and creamy can come late and suddenly, but it should happen eventually. Was the butter cold? I have been getting the best results with room-temperature butter. Did you sieve the powdered sugar? If not, that may be the problem. Or did it perhaps get wet at some point ...


3

Margarine is essentially 80% hydrogenated vegetable oil, the rest being mostly water and a touch of coloring and flavoring. Shortening is essentially 100% hydrogenated vegetable oil. That means that to truly substitute shortening versus margarine, you would need 5 units of margarine, versus 4 units of shortening plus one unit of water. However, in many, ...


3

Your best bet it to divide the dough into two batches, freezing half for later. With the half you are working with, add 1/2 recipe worth of all the other ingredients again, except the lard. This will bring you into balance. The tortillas may be somewhat tougher than you would get if they were made to specification the first time, but that will avoid ...


3

Most vegetable oils are predominantly some type of unsaturated fatty acid - that is, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated. This type of fatty acid is a liquid at room temperature ("oil"). On the other hand, saturated fat is a solid at room temperature, which is easily demonstrated with butter or animal fat (lard) - which are primarily what vegetable shortening ...


3

Puff pastry is hard to master, and temperature control is ever so important. The butter (kremelta) should be manageable, but not liquid to start with. You fold it into the dough, close the envelope, flatten it and fold it once. Then, it should go into the fridge for half an hour or so. Every two folds, you should put it in the fridge again for half an hour. ...


2

"Vegetable shortening" is a type of fat. It is created from vegetable fats in a highly industrialized process, until it is a solid white block. It mimics the baking properties of lard the same way margarine mimics the baking properties of butter. You may be able to find vegetable shortening under some different name, such as "fat of plant origin", "frying ...


2

You may get a slight amount of extra browning using butter due to the extra proteins, but it's normally such a small amount of butter being used I wouldn't think it would be very noticeable. The water in butter may also have an effect on very delicate items, but I don't think it would have a discernable effect on items like muffins, quickbreads, etc.


2

If you can find a copy, Graham Kerr's "Minimax Cookbook" has guidance and several recipes for low-fat baking. He used to be the galloping gourmet, and produced recipes with outrageous amounts of fat, sugar, and so on. Then his wife had a stroke and he re-examined how he cooks in order to be able to meet her dietary requirements while not losing flavor, ...


2

what you are looking for does not exist. a way to make the food [low fat] for him without losing flavor This is impossible. Fat is very important in baking for both taste and texture. Assuming that your husband's fat/salt/sugar diet means that the substitute has to contain less fat per unit of weight than shortening, you will be losing lots of ...


2

Vegetable shortening is commonly known in the U.S. by the brand name Crisco. It's made by saturating the molecules of a liquid oil, commonly vegetable or canola oil, with extra hydrogen, which increases its melting point so that it's a solid at room temperature. Shortening in the U.S. has generally come to replace other solid fats traditionally used in ...


2

There is no way to know what they meant when they said "homogenized" - this really sounds like marketing-speak. But if you are trying to whip shortening with water, you will need emulsifiers. I could imagine that the Spry already had them in. The "With cake improver" sentence in the can also points in this direction, as cake improver often contains ...


2

No, shortening is a solid fat. This means you have to substitute another solid fat, else the recipe won't work. So, use the butter as it is. You probably will have to bring the butter to room temperature to be workable (shortening hardens less in the fridge). Don't use the microwave, it will produce melted spots. Leave it out overnight or longer, or, in ...


2

Shortening is used here because it is solid at room temperature so it adheres to the sides of the pan and provides a better barrier. Spray oil can do ok and has emulsifiers in it to help it along but solid fat works better. An obvious substitute is butter. Actually butter can be substituted for shortening in a lot of applications (with the exception of when ...


2

Just like when making fudge, Mother used to fold this by hand in a metal bowl on her lap. Honestly I think it's the slight impartation of body temperature which induces the sugar granules (microgranules) to break down a bit, you know, just this side of syrup. The smallest taste every once in awhile marks your progress. (It was really nice to be reminded of ...


1

Follow all of Layna's answer, and also sift the sugar, and keep everything at room temperature. If you use milk, only a half teaspoon. Remember you can't rush perfection. The trick with all cooking baking and even life is patience.


1

Softened butter should do a good enough job in this situation. You could conceivably use ghee but that might flavour the cake.


1

Buttercream frosting is kept in the fridge because the butter softens too much at room temperature. Decorations lose their definition, and many people prefer the firmer texture for the taste. There is no way to change the properties of butter, so you will have to work with another fat if you can't refrigerate. The problem is that all solid fats bring their ...


1

There are several different types of icing that are referred to as buttercream, none of which require the use of shortening, including: American Buttercream -- Butter, powdered sugar, perhaps some milk, and flavoring such as vanilla beaten together. While some recipes call for shortening, using actual butter gives a better flavor. See a sample recipe ...


1

Whip butter, and then add whipped egg whites Then blend in sugar which has been boiled to "soft ball" state (115°C or 240°F) Should be plenty of recipes on the web


1

The blogger at The Simple Front Porch recommends the recipe, using Crisco in lieu of the Spry's. This vintage advertisement shows a drawing of the can, which is clearly labeled "pure vegetable shortening." The homogenized is clearly marketing speak--after all, any pure vegetable shortening is going to be very homogeneous. It was obviously simply a ...



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