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11

Funnily enough I made some of these just a week ago. They're not at all difficult to make and you can use any rind, which your butcher should be able to supply. Depending on your health considerations, you can oven cook them or you can part oven cook part fry. Oven cook method: Cut the rinds into 4 by 4cm pieces Place in a pan of boiling water for 10 ...


11

I recommend (and use) a utility knife. Not only are they fairly tough and sharp, you can adjust the blade to the depth you need (you don't want to cut too deep). And the blades are cheap to replace... As others have noted in the comments, be careful with this as you would with any knife: the blades may be small, but they're quite sharp.


9

It's definitely a very real reaction. I'm not sure exactly what in the squash it is that causes it, but since different people react differently - some people have strong reactions like you, some people have mild ones, and some have no problem at all - it seems to be some sort of mild allergic reaction. It's often called contact dermatitis, but that's a very ...


7

It's not about chemicals on the outside of the fruit; washing the fruit well should take care of that. Whether we eat the skin of any given fruit basically boils down to whether it a) tastes good and b) has a pleasant texture. For example, some people eat the skin of the kiwi, despite it having a hairy texture that many people find unpleasant. Many people do ...


5

The skin of all the small fish I have tried is delicious. I have never tried, e.g. tuna skin, and I imagine that it is too tough and I also wouldn't eat shark skin. Back when I used to eat fish, I always ate the skin, and found it to be the best part. Beware, though, as while the skin concentrates the deliciousness, it also concentrates the mercury and ...


4

Typically the "raw" rind is referred to as a "pellet", so you need to Google "pork rind pellets" to find sellers. Warning: they tend to come in huge bags, so unless you want to experience death by 65lb bag of pork-rind-pellets, go in with some friends.


4

It's best to skin it almost immediately after it's been shot as that's the easiest time. If that's not possible you can hang the carcass for a few days as long as it's kept in a cool environment. Hanging venison is not always necessary like it is with other animals to tenderise the meat, though this can depend on the breed of deer. When I butcher roe I don't ...


4

It's easiest to skin the deer when it's still warm, but since that isn't an option let it hang for a day or two, if the weather isn't going to get above around 40 degrees F. If this is your first time, definitely have a helper on hand to help you hold the deer. Have a hacksaw and a sharp knife on hand. A small electric knife/chainsaw is helpful but not ...


4

Trout - fried in butter with almond chips. Simple, quick, utterly sublime...


3

You can buy the pig skin from a butcher, any kind will do, even if they still have some fat or meat attached. The way we make them is you buy pork lard from the store and you heat it up, add a lot of salt, or to taste. Fry the pork skin until they look like the ones in the potato chip isle, pretty much just eyeball it. Also, you can add water to the fat, ...


3

To defrost faster, you could put a vacuum-packed item in cold water. Just be sure to keep the water cold--either put the whole container in the fridge or change out the water periodically on the counter. If you don't use water, I'd allow at least 48 hours in the fridge to defrost. Anyhow, please don't attempt cooking in two phases. Botulism is one ...


3

Your proposed method is possibly dangerous, you'd be warming it enough for botulism to thrive, but not enough to kill it. When you cook it, cook it properly and all at once. What I'd suggest is simply cooking it on Friday, then re-heating it saturday, or getting up early enough to cook it through on Saturday. As for when to thaw it if it's a truly heroic ...


3

Salmon skin is also really delicious crisped up and mixed into sushi rolls, if you're into making that kind of stuff at home. I usually just put in the salmon skin, rice, and a little bit of avocado.


2

Striped Bass and Red Snapper have great skin which you can leave on when preparing fish, and then let crisp up and eat with the fillet.


2

You'll need a lot longer than 20 minutes that the recipe suggests. For cow tongue, we usually let them sit in a crock-pot for about 4hrs. My guess for lamb tongue is about 90 minutes on low simmer. The skin tends come loose from the muscle underneath when done. The best trick I've found is to cut the skin down the center of the tongue (lengthwise). Use a ...


2

Most Japanese varieties of pumpkin do not need to be peeled. More precisely, most Japanese are content to eat most Japanese varieties of squash unpeeled (maybe rough peeled where knobs are present). I can't really recall treating red kuri any differently, but I don't find it very often, so I can only speak from limited experience. The typical preparation of ...


2

I've had this happen before after preparing butternut squash. Once, I also found that my fingers turned shiny. I realized that the wax that was on the butternut squash had gotten on my hands since I had rinsed the squash under hot water before peeling. It was impossible to wash away this wax coating on my fingers, so I just left it on my hands even though ...


1

Pollutants and heavy metals are known to build up in relatively higher concentrations in most fish skin compared to the actual meat, though the small amount of skin anyone is likely to eat in one sitting won't do much harm, if any. Still, the actual concentrations depend on the environment and fish in question, so if you aren't sure about the origin I'd ...


1

I don't have experience with this specific squash, so perhaps someone with direct experience can give you a better answer; googling indicates it is a thick skinned or winter squash similar to a pumpkin. As a thick skinned squash, it is normal to peel it (or to scoop the roasted flesh from the peel), because as you note, the peels are tougher. They are ...


1

I would say it's totally up to you. I prefer it with the skin still on, it get's really juicy inside. However it's a bit more difficult to eat. So perhaps if you were making it for kids (although, you could just skin them after they are fried), you could skin it. One opportunity I really think is better without skin is when you serve it with sauce. Having ...


1

If the hunter field dressed it properly and the weather is cool enough, you can let the deer hang for a few days before processing. Since this is your first time, I'd look around for a local butcher / game processing store. If you are going to proceed on your own, I'd start by typing 'skinning a deer' into your favorite search engine and go from there. ...



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