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To quote a comment: According to Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking", when meat is cooked for an extended time below 120˚F or brought up to temperature slowly the myoglobin remains intact and there will be a distinct red color throughout the meat. – Didgeridrew Sep 23 '13 at 16:39 Here is the Science of Cooking article @Digdgeridrew mentioned To ...


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I do agree with the comments about using the proper temperature and simmering. It can be difficult to achieve that perfect simmer, especially with a lidded pan, but quite worth the effort. Please see this from CookingLight as it gives very good information about boiling and simmering and how to get to where you want to be. Another thing would be to ...


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Go with them the way they are - you sometimes have to live with your ingredients. I'd slice them, then brown on both sides and the top - should be fine.


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Different cuts of ribs have different degrees of curve to them. In my experience, baby back ribs are the most curved, and St. Louis cut spareribs are the flatest (although that is a relative term). This page has a chart showing where the different cuts of ribs come from in the rib cage in case you're interested. I wouldn't try to flatten the ribs; I can't ...


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You can cook Brisket to the point that it it is tender but sliceable, but that's tricky if you're slow cooking while at work or the like. Try topside, also often called salmon cut. It has a less a denser texture than brisket but still responds well to slow cooking.


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For that many guests on a budget, you will need a leg of lamb (Tesco has a whole leg, suitable for 8-10 guests, for £25 - likely more at a Halal butcher, but not in break-the-bank territory) While a crock-pot might not be large enough, an inexpensive electric roasting pan should be, and ideal for the "low and slow" braising or roasting techniques that joint ...


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This article, by a reputable food scientist, summarizes the possible dangers inherent in slow cooking of turkeys, with some scientific citations and actual experimental data on microbiological growth in slow-cooked turkeys. I'd encourage anyone interested in slow cooking to read it to appreciate the great variety of microbes which could cause problems, as ...


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There are basically three primary concerns when cooking your turkey: bacteria, spores, and toxins. Bacteria: As you point out, since your turkey eventually reaches at least 165 degrees, all the live bacteria will be killed. Spores: Some of the bacterial spores will not be killed, which means that as the meat cools, they will have a chance to grow again. ...


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Temperature isn't the only factor in bacterial growth. According to Wikipedia: A number of wood smoke compounds act as preservatives. Phenol and other phenolic compounds in wood smoke are both antioxidants, which slow rancidification of animal fats, and antimicrobials, which slow bacterial growth. Other antimicrobials in wood smoke include formaldehyde, ...


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I have this rice cooker, although it's branded "National", not "Panasonic". It has a perforated platform that you can put in after the rice and water, and it sits about an inch above the bottom of the pot. Perfect for steaming salmon filets. It's not a deep fryer nor a slow cooker.


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Yes, there is something like a slow cooker which will double as a steamer and a deep fryer, as well as cook rice. NOT all at once, obviously, but a really good quality, heavy-bottomed large stainless steel pan + lid + a steamer inset + a rice ball like this: should fulfil all your requirements without too many gadgets or "stuff" cluttering your kitchen ...


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A rice cooker uses higher heat and much more quickly....it uses high pressure as well, so steams AND boils at the same time. You DO know that the proper rice is a VERY short grained rice grown especially for sushi, right? having said that, I recently learned that it can be best to soak rice a half hour or so before cooking. I no longer own a rice cooker, ...


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I'm not an expert on candy-making, but it sounds to me as if you didn't heat the sugar sufficiently. The temperature that the sugar reaches will affect the texture when it cools: https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/sugar-stages.html I'd attempt to heat it back up to hard-crack state (300°F), and see if I could recover it. Being that I don't ...



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