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3

Make sure nothing burned onto the sides (scrape it out if necessary), and add extra water if too much has boiled off. After that, I'd probably check it after 3 hours on low, pretending that the hour on high cooked it twice as much as it would have on low, and see if you think it's done. No harm letting it go the full remaining 4-5 hours if it seems like it ...


2

First, I'd check the insides to make sure that you aren't burning around the edges. Some long cook times on high can evaporate the liquid out (even when covered) and create a very stubborn burn ring around the inside. That aside, crockpot cooking is not a very sensitive or precise method of cooking. I'd say to reduce the temp to low and ride out the rest of ...


11

According to the USDA: If packaging is accidentally cooked in a conventional oven, is the food safe to eat? Plastic packaging materials should not be used at all in conventional ovens. They may catch on fire or melt, causing chemical migration into foods. Sometimes these materials are inadvertently cooked with a product. For example, giblets ...


3

There's no health issue here, the sausages will be cooked enough to be safe. The reason you fry off the sausages first is that you make the casings more edible, get flavor from maillard reactions and browning, and maybe get rid of some of the fat (if you discard the fat that comes out of the sausages that is). I'm thinking that the sausage casings could ...


1

I read somewhere that you should lightly grease ceramic crockpot with a small amount of oil after cleaning .


5

The accepted answer from the linked question is just as accurate in this situation. Assuming you're talking about "stew meat" sized pieces (about 2cm per side or so) by the time smaller pieces brown sufficiently, they should be nearly if not completely cooked through. By similar logic, when you refrigerate them they should cool down more quickly than a ...


0

Disclaimer: I've only cooked chuck roasts low 'n' slow in the oven, not on grill but hopefully something I say will help. During a show on Food Network I heard one of the famous, established chefs say that, with meats that are traditionally done low and slow, you also have the option to go quick on high heat. If you go one extreme or the other you're ok, ...



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