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I had the same problem for months. My final solution was to beat up the roast a bit before I put in the slow cooker, and occasionally stab a few holes in the roast so the tasty liquids can get inside. I also reuse the left over liquid as a gravy. Presentation wise the roast looks like it got hit by a truck, but who cares when every bite is juicy and tasty.


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Yes. A typical slow cooker's low setting ranges between 8-10 hours, which is within the range of your listed times. All (or nearly all) slow cookers come with a removable ceramic bowl/insert that the food cooks in. Most families do most of the preparation in the evening, putting everything into that bowl, and putting the bowl into the refrigerator. Then ...


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Tough cuts become tender because collagen breaks down over time in the presence of heat and moisture, which usually takes several hours. When cooking that long the meat heats up to be the same as the oven temperature, so in this case internal meat temperature = oven temperature.


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Easy, that's what slow cookers do. Not all recipes do well for all day cooking, but many do. Here's a little collection to get you started. Here's a Google search for all day recipes. The whole point of the Crock-Pot is that it gets food out of the "danger zone" (above 140F, 60C) quickly, but cooks the food slowly. There are tons of well loved recipes that ...


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This is the method I use to smoke meat in my Weber! The basics are exactly what you see in the photo, with one more step. Start about a dozen (or in a 22.5" grill like that one, maybe 18-24) briquettes in your charcoal starter (you have one of those right? if not, go get one, they're awesome). When the coals in your starter are glowing, carefully place them ...


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The goal is to maximize the cool spot in the grill, so you can cook larger items slowly. I'm not aware of there being any magic to it, other than being a differently shaped fire for indirect cooking. Unlike your typical two-level fire, you don't need a hot area to sear over, so it's pushed as far to the edge as possible to create a larger cool zone. I've ...


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I assume you light one end. The charcoal then burns along the path creating very low heat and smoke. Seems like it would work, but my worry would be the quality of the smoke. For a detailed analysis of techniques, click here: http://www.chefsteps.com/activities/barbecue-techniques


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~~ Isn't there still a movement afoot, longneck, which promotes the preparation of foods (including meats) at surprisingly low temperatures over longer periods of time instead of higher temperatures lickety-split? I think so. And I think it's got a pretty solid footing. Room temperature seems to be the proverbial culprit, generally speaking. But the kind ...


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The important temperature would be what temperature it was at when the power was turned back on. The official recommendations are to keep high risk foods out of the 'danger zone' of 40°F to 140°F for longer than 2hrs (cumulative). If portions of the pot were at 140°F after being heated for an hour, and there was the time for it to cool down. (and the time ...


3

It depends on the particulars of the recipe and the ingredients and the slow cooker itself. You say you are using chicken or beef, but are the pieces of meat small or large? Is the meat lean or fatty? I've had problems with overcooking large pieces of lean meat, such as chicken breast, but smaller pieces and/or fattier pieces seem to hold up better to ...


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I have slow cooked in crock pots for 12 hours without any problems. Actually, I just ate a bowl of beef vegetable soup that slow cooked for at least that long.


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Tough beef becomes tender because the connective tissue breaks down into gelatine in the presence of heat and moisture. This can be sped up considerably using a pressure cooker, so that's your solution. There are considerations to this: a pressure cooker that could take 15 lbs of skirt steak all at once would be very large, hard to handle, and possibly ...


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Kidney beans have high levels of phytohaemagglutinin, which is a protein that can mess with cell walls and cell metabolism. If you don't cook the beans enough, this protein can make you really sick. The good news is that boiling kidney beans for 10 minutes takes care of the problem. The protein breaks down and leaves your beans perfectly safe to eat. So ...



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