Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Our taste buds are tuned for salt (NaCl), but potassium chloride (KCl) comes pretty close in reproducing the sensation. There are a few commercial salt substitutes that incorporate KCl (Nu-salt, Morton Salt Substitute in the US). As sodium is an essential mineral and potassium may be hard to get out of the body, make sure you ask a doctor before completely ...


8

Reduce or leave out the salt. It is not essential to the chemistry of the recipe. I will not speculate on salt substitutes, as that is a health and medical issue, off topic for this site. The pancakes will then not taste as good, but that is unavoidable. Perhaps you can serve them with a highly flavorful accompaniment, like a reduced peach chutney or ...


8

Generally it's things that have been prepared such that there's some sort of added preservative -- salt, sulfates, sulfides, nitrates, etc. So this would include all hams except 'fresh ham', almost all deli meats, all sausages, bacon, jerky, corned beef, etc. So yes, sausage is considered a processed meat. If you want to get all technical about what ...


8

When my doctor told me to start cutting my salt intake, I headed to the spice aisle at the grocery store and bought every "salt-free" blend they had and started trying them. It was one of the best things I did, because I discovered how much I'd been relying on salt for flavor and how inadequate that was. I now buy my spices from The Spice House (much ...


7

You should refer to the discussion here: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5460/are-msg-and-accent-the-same-thing Some relevant points: MSG is found naturally in seaweed and other things. It is used to enhance the flavors it is combined with. It is completely harmless unless you are limiting your sodium intake. Check out the wikipedia article on ...


6

If you have high blood pressure, then you may be looking for low-sodium salt. LoSalt is the only brand I've ever sampled and there is no obvious taste difference. If, on the other hand, you are looking to add a little taste variety to dishes, then you might try fish sauce, soy sauce or anchovies. Using parmigiano-reggiano or dashi will also give you the ...


5

Cooks Illustrated apparently sent some brined meat off to a lab for analysis: We were also interested in finding out how much sodium penetrates during the process. To answer the question, we brined natural pork chops and boneless, skinless chicken breasts in standard quick-brine solutions of 1/2 cup table salt dissolved in 2 quarts of cold water. ...


5

I use lemon juice and vinegars to approximate saltiness in foods. Lemon juice works particularly well in soups. I use 1/4 cup of lemon juice as a flavor enhancer in pots of soup of eight to 12 cups. Obviously, this is a subjective measure, and I'd recommend adding the juice by the tablespoonful, tasting the soup, and then adding more juice until you achieve ...


5

Most of the time you use salt for making the food taste better. If this is the purpose, you can substitute lots of different spices and herbs. I cook Asian-style food without the usage of any salt. Instead I use a lot of garlic and onions. Ginger powder is quite good enhancing other existing flavours what salt is sometimes used for. Otherwise, it depends on ...


5

MSG has been the subject of debate because of its possible effects on health -- most commonly headaches. While there is a stigma attached to MSG, there hasn't been any conclusive research to show that MSG is in fact linked to adverse reactions. MSG (aka glutamates) serves as a flavor enhancer. Using it creates a richer, meatier, mushroomy taste and brings ...


4

Generally such health fears will be to do with the amount of additives in "processed meat". The use of Mechanically Reclaimed Meat (MRM) is also rather frowned upon. At the height of the media coverage of such issues in the UK, Turkey Twizzlers were singled out for particular hatred, the ingredients list almost speaks for itself. (Via: ...


4

If you are used to eating a lot of salt, you may first need to accustom your palate to enjoying the natural, un-salt-enhanced flavours. Lemon juice, spices, or other pungent/aromatic ingredients are a good way to keep your dishes flavourful without salt. You may initially find that you're missing the "salty" taste itself. The cure for this is just to wait ...


4

Unfortunately the sodium chloride salt is a requirement for the fungus and brewing process which goes into making soy sauce, you are extremely unlikely to find a much lower salt soy sauce, however experiment with vietnamese cuisine which uses more chilli and less soy if you can tolerate some sodium, this is the lowest sodium soy sauce i can find ...


3

I agree with SAJ14SAJ. You can leave out the salt or use a small amount of it, without a problem. What you can add to minimize the loss of flavour, is a pinch of vanilla (for neutral-tasting pancakes) or a different aroma, for instance almond extract (for a variation).


3

good quality sausages don't contain sodium nitrite. you can tell, because it looks like ground up meat in a sausage stuffing. the "processed" meats you're referring to have a different texture & color - think hot dog or deli-meat (pink). mechanically process is very different from chemically processed. nutritionally, you want to steer clear of the ...


2

Lime juice, tamarind paste, vinegars, mango powder, sour yogarts are what I use with a little as possible of table salt.


2

You would find it difficult to stay away from MSG since it occurs naturally in most foods. Concerning the dangers of using it as a taste enhancer, I imagine the health issues are similar to those of other sodium salts.


2

I would recommend trying Bragg's Liquid Aminos. The sodium content is 6% daily allowance for a 1/2 tsp amount. It won't work if used measure measure, though, compared with San-J's reduced sodium tamari at 29% for 1 TBS or Kikkoman's Less Sodium Soy Sauce at 24% for 1 TBS. (Bragg's Liquid Aminos would top them at 36%.) If it can be used successfully in ...


2

Answer depends on how the kim chi is made. I make it using a variant on this recipe. The protocol there is to treat the leaves with a salty brine for 4 hours, then rinse them extensively. No further salt is added in the recipe, so any salt in the final product will have osmosed into the leaves. Most of that salt won't come back out except with a prolonged ...


2

A random web site I have no reason to trust claims that half a teaspoon of baking soda contains 616 mg of sodium. This more reputable site says 150 for 1/8 tsp, which pretty much agrees, and also says 100-200 in 1/4 tsp of baking powder. Let's take those as correct for now. My favourite pancake recipe uses 2 tsp of baking powder to make about 12 pancakes, so ...


1

My husband has had a low sodium diet due to kidney and heart disease since 2008 and I've faced this challenge already. Baking soda is the culprit - not added table salt. There are several low or no sodium recipes online for pancakes but be sure to select using a no sodium baking powder. One of my favorite websites is lowsodiumcooking.com. There is a no ...


1

Assuming you are making savoury crepes/pancakes/waffles then missing salt could a big compromize on the flavour/taste. There's no substitue for salt but low-sodium table salt(that contains Potassium chloride). (So I still prefer sea salt). Lemon juice activates the same taste receptors as sodium, so adding a spritz of lemon to your food in place of salt ...


1

I think it depends on to many things to give a good guide, the shape of the meat being very hard to model. I.e. a very thin piece will 'brine' much faster than a sphere. One way would be to do equilibrium brine (see Modernist Cuisine), i.e. brine for if I remember correctly 2-3 days up to 1-2 weeks (for very large pieces of meat) until equilibrium has been ...


1

I buy the lowest sodium content soya sauce I can find. I then mix the sauce 50 50 with distilled water. The distilled water has no flavours to compete with the diluted soya sauce. For fish and oyster sauces I buy the vegetarian types which are lower in sodium. For the fish sauce I dilute it about 25% with distilled water.


1

Short answer, no. But you can look at other ingredients in a stir-fry and ramp up the flavor there: for the sour ingredients (vinegar lemon juice) try Shaanxi black vinegar which has a robust dark flavor Few drops more toasted sesame oil to replace other mild frying oil broth made with shitake instead of milder chicken/veg stock dash of aged Shaoxing ...


1

Generally they put those chemicals in the meat to enhance the flavour (salt / sodium) and so it stays on the self longer - nitrates (prevent bacteria from growing) Long as you look at the packaging and look for high levels of meat 70 - 80% they will need put less salt in for flavour. but they will always need put the preservatives or it wont keep for very ...


1

I get my sausages from a great butcher, and I'm certain that all the "processing" done to them is benign. "Processing" in this case entails mincing, mixing with breadcrumbs, spices etc. and putting in the skins. They will be high in fat -- because it's pork and it won't be from the leanest part of the pig, and because the fat makes for moist delicious ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible