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16

First of all, the names vary a bit from country to country, or the ingredients do. I'll explain the most common names/ingredients. The main difference is in the ingredients used. Sorbet is basically water + sugar + fruit, while ice cream and gelato is milk/cream + sugar + fruit. So the last two are more 'creamy', while sorbet is more 'icy'. You can say ...


9

The general things that can cause icy sorbet: Too much water Compared to other ingredients. Since you probably aren't going to take water out of your fruit, you pretty much have to add sugar or alcohol to compensate for this. This is tricky if you're improvising, and if the water content of the fruit varies. Bad churning/freezing: This is mostly determined ...


7

Almost any normal sorbet recipe will contain a decent amount of sugar, and strawberries are no exception. I'd guess probably 1/2-2/3 cup per pound of strawberries. Use a substitute if you have an aversion - honey, agave, raw cane sugar, whatever you prefer. (Of course, anything liquid is going to contain some water, and cause a bit of ice, but it's still ...


6

There are a few things to consider here. Firstly, sugar dissolves in hot water better than in cold water. So, regardless of other considerations, it's worth making a simple syrup of the water and sugar. What will change by heating is a few things. From a taste standpoint, depending on how you cook the fruit, the sorbet may taste "cooked". If that's the ...


6

When I was a child in Britain, sherbet was a fizzy powder. Sorbet is definitely water, sugar and flavourings: no milk.


6

Actually, they are not quite the same. Sorbet is ice sweetened with fruit, wine, or liquer. Italian ice, which is similar, does not contain ice but contains frozen fruit purees or similar. Sherbert contains a small amount of dairy, but the milkfat content is less than 3%, differentiating it from ice cream. In the U. S. what is commonly called sorbet is ...


4

Blueberries, and especially underripe blueberries, have a lot of pectin. Blueberries have about .4g per 100g compared to apples which have .5g. As you suspected this is almost definitely causing the problem. Many blueberry jam recipes consist of just heating pureed blueberries with sugar and acid- no added pectin needed. When you heated your pureed ...


4

I don't have a recipe for a sorbet without any fruit contributing sugar, but I do have something very close: the lemon sorbet from The Perfect Scoop. It uses a cup of lemon juice, which contains only 6 g of sugar, along with 2.5 cups of water and 1 cup of sugar. So 3.5 cups (828 mL) of water with 1 cup (200 g) of sugar should be good, or a ratio of 4:1 by ...


4

If you're worried about the sugar not dissolving, you can add golden syrup to the thawed sorbet. It will also make your sorbet softer. I've only tried making sorbet a couple of times but when I used golden syrup, its consistency was softer than when I used sugar.


4

The problem could be the recipe. If you're using a lot of lemon juice, then a lot of sugar to cover up all that acidity, you're guaranteed to end up with something pretty soft. Have a look around at other lemon sorbet recipes, and see if you're using relatively more. But if your recipe is sane, then it could be your process. Here's how it could mess things ...


3

A variety of factors can change the texture of a sorbet: The amount of sugar or other large quantity solutes (less dissolved solids, harder texture). The rate of freezing (slower freezing, larger crystals). The use of any "stabilizers" (guar/xanthan gum, gelatin, etc.). These interfere with the formation of large crystals. I believe the stabilizer I use ...


3

Runny isn't usually so much of the problem. If it is too runny then it hasn't frozen enough. If you are freezing in an ice cream churn then the mixture should churn until it has thickened. At least until there is no liquid that hasn't crystallized. If you are pre-freezing the mixture into a block and chopping it up in the food processor then the mixture ...


2

A couple simple, practical things to go with Sobachatina's suggestions: First, you can break up the gel with a serious blender, not just a whisk. If it gets liquid really flowing, it'll disintegrate pretty well. Even easier, though: just don't chill it, at least not that much. What exactly you can get away with depends on your ice cream maker, the ...


2

Thaw just enough to easily remove the tops and cut into halves or quarters, then puree while still semi-frozen. That will give you a head start on the chilling of the sorbet mixture. You want that super cold anyway, before you put it into the machine.


2

Too much to go into here, but let me refer you to Harold McGee's less well known book, The Curious Cook: More Kitchen Science and Lore, where he has an entire chapter devoted to this topic, complete with tables for a whole bunch of fruits.


1

Salt counters bitterness. It may seem a little odd to add salt to a sorbet, but I can assure you that it is not unusual to use salt in desserts. Adding salt will also enhance the perceived sweetness of the sorbet. You won't need much salt. Maybe a small pinch per serving would be enough. Just be sure to note the total amount of salt you add to a batch so ...


1

Try using Pectin! It will enhance flavors and minimize the size of ice crystals. If you can't find it in raw form, use peach preserves (2tsp and you won't taste it). Check the ingredients to be sure it contains Pectin. It works well in Ice cream too if your not willing to use eggs (custard) Food Science Teacher ...


1

I bookmarked a blog post long ago that explains how you can make your own invert sugar to improve the texture of sorbet -- you use acid to break the sucrose down into a mix of fructose and glucose, which crystallize more slowly than the sucrose of table sugar does.


1

The machine will make a difference. I've found that home machines with a spinning bowl with a scraper that sits inside tend to make larger crystals and lose their freezing ability before the sorbet is quite set up enough. It makes good sorbet/icecream for same day use but if you hold it for too long (a day or two) it'll start getting grainy fast. ...


1

To boost the flavour of 'not-great' strawberries, try throwing in a few raspberries (fresh or frozen) and the lemon juice suggested by rfusca. Their very intense flavour will add zing to your sorbet.


1

Try the lemon juice, a touch of honey, and just a tiny, tiny bit of vanilla.


1

Your question asks about a lot of very specific scientific detail, but really, with a bit of experience, you can make sorbet without any of that. For most fruits, you need about 1/3 as much sugar as fruit by volume - two cups of fruit and 2/3 cup sugar is pretty common in recipes. This works with a good variety of fruits - for example, mangoes, ...



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