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2

Shaken, not stirred... -James Bond For dissolving solids into liquids, agitation beats stirring every time. Whenever I make instant "just add boiling water" soup/noodles/whatever with a powdered base, I do so in a vessel that can be closed with a tight seal so I can shake the water and ingredients together instead of stirring them. I haven't seen a ...


1

Stir to the bottom of the cup or mug immediately after (or while) pouring and use boiling-hot water. In my experience, which is mostly with the same brand, this clumpy paste will only form if you wait too long to stir or use water that's too cold. I'm sure some of the other tips given here will work with enough time and effort but I'd like to respect the ...


1

Unlike the Oster Versa Performance, any Blendtec, or Vitamix blenders, there does not exist a version of the Ninja blenders that attain high enough speeds to actually make hot soup from cold starting ingredients. Besides that, Ninja blenders have specific warning to not place hot liquids over 180°F/82°C in them.


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I find that waiting is often the key. Add you powder, then your boiling water, stir a little (no need to go crazy), then add your noodles. Cover the mug with a heavy object you don't mind getting wet (or touching your food) like a plastic plate. Wait 5-10 minuets. Stir a little bit to get an even temperature. Enjoy soup. By covering the mug your keeping ...


3

An option: use a heavy ceramic mug fill with half the water called for bring to a rolling boil (ie. bubbles) in a microwave carefully stir in the package mix to lower the temp to something palatable, I add tepid tap water to very hot water in the mug A bonus side effect, since the mug was heated quite a bit, it keeps to soup warmer longer.


21

Add the water incrementally. It's probably enough to add just a bit, stir, then add the rest, but you can break it up a bit more if that doesn't work. A clump of powder or a lump of paste won't dissolve easily into water, but it's easy enough to add a little water to it and thin it out. So the idea is to work your way up from powder to paste to thinner ...


7

From chemistry we know that dissolving is affected by temperature, pressure, surface area, and agitation. temperature: are you using a hot water dispenser that isn't hot enough? If you have access to a microwave, you could use it for a minute or so. pressure: not really applicable here if you're making instant soup in a mug surface area: the powder ...


1

Freezing from hot isn't a good idea for the neighbouring items in your freezer but shouldn't make much difference to the soup (it will start cooling down faster, but then more slowly as the freezer will be warmer than it should be). Freezing the soup before blending it should help, then reheat before blending. If you are making it specifically to freeze, ...


2

Farro is essentially a variety of wheat, and I assume your recipe is using it in whole form, rather than milled in some way. Therefore, you'd want to substitute another grain that will provide at least a similar texture. Farro Rice is gluten-free, so you could use any kind of whole grain rice as a substitute. Brown Rice You could use wild rice, ...


1

A "soup chicken" used to be called a "stewing chicken." This just means that it is an older, tougher bird that should be cooked using a slow-cooking or stewing method in order to soften up the meat. Stewing chicken tends to have more flavor than young chicken, so it is ideal for soups and stews (obviously), but also for dishes that include small pieces of ...


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I'd recommend brining or salting the meat and roasting it, then chopping it and adding it near the end of cooking for the soup. Wild turkey is difficult to say the least! The reason for my suggestion is that I make a shortcut version of chicken and dumplings that uses a rotisserie chicken from the grocery store, with the shredded meat stirred in at the ...



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