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2

A healthy and flavoursome choice. Very sensible given your parameters -- no experience and low budget. My experience of student needs pointed to chicken and game rather than lamb, beef, pork, etc. The modus operandi is to cover a chicken with water in a large pan and bring to the boil with a bay leaf, a carrot, an onion, a stick of celery and some ...


7

Goldilocks provided some very good general advice. Just to address a few more points in the specific questions posed: 1) In what order should I saute the first veggies (for example, garlic onion and carrots) ? How long do I need to cook them for? Garlic takes the shortest time to cook, particularly if it is minced or pressed, so it should be added last, ...


4

Anything that will keep bacteria and other spoilage microorganisms from growing will extend shelf life. Acidity and salt are the most common historical preservatives, since they create inhospitable environments for many microorganisms (or only allow the growth of ones that are less harmful). In high concentrations, sugar can also function in this way, as ...


2

I'd refine this with regard to the handling of meat and broth/stock. If you want to make a stock, you'd start with meat scraps (including bones, skin, etc.) and some veggies like celery and onion. Although the meat could be already cooked (e.g., a chicken carcass) you won't be reusing it again1. You'll be boiling beyond what would be considered edible and ...


2

If you had a plastic ladle, it may not be able to handle high-heat for an extended period of time. If it were in contact with the bottom of the pot, it's possible that it would get above 100°C, and depending on the material, could soften. It probably wouldn't melt entirely, but it'd be shocking enough that you'd question if anything leached into the soup, ...


0

I see this is a little late, but these ideas were helpful. I added too much pepper to my soup. My fix was I used the water from boiling the noodles & added a can of petite diced tomatoes. It worked!


1

If the ladle was made of aluminium (or aluminum, if you prefer), then it would be a bad idea to leave it in anything acidic, as it could contaminate the food with aluminium salts, which may (it's controversial) be implicated in Alzheimer's.


0

While I agree with john2103 I would also add that if the soup is thickened with tapioca starch, the soup could un-thicken due to the possible moving ladle.


3

Maybe because the ladle gets hot and could burn someone?


0

I have just come up with something to enhance the flavour of a vegetable soup that I've made, as it came out a little bland: spicy tomato ketchup (specifically Levi Roots Reggae Reggae Tomato Ketchup). The soup was made with a broth mix ( yellow & green split peas, marrow fat peas, split lentils, pearl barley) it also had sautéed onions, carrots, ...


0

I would say NEVER cook noodles at the same time for all the reasons the smart friends above suggested but my adamant reason is that it makes the soup look and taste like dishwater!


4

A few ways exist to keep your spoon from falling into your soup. The first of which is to not keep your spoon in your soup. How to do that however, is quite varied: Purchase a spoon rest. Use a clean and empty plate to rest your spoon on by laying the spoon head on the plate. I, being a bit of a frugal cook, don't own a spoon rest. I use a plate - ...


6

The obvious solution is to not let the spoon in the pot. While you may just let it rest on the pot, you can also use a spoon rest, as I do. Spoon rests I always let one of those on the oven so that I can avoid making a mess of my kitchen when I am finished using my ustensils.


6

Use a longer spoon? Stir, then set on spoon rack next to pan?



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