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2

If you had a plastic ladle, it may not be able to handle high-heat for an extended period of time. If it were in contact with the bottom of the pot, it's possible that it would get above 100°C, and depending on the material, could soften. It probably wouldn't melt entirely, but it'd be shocking enough that you'd question if anything leached into the soup, ...


0

I see this is a little late, but these ideas were helpful. I added too much pepper to my soup. My fix was I used the water from boiling the noodles & added a can of petite diced tomatoes. It worked!


1

If the ladle was made of aluminium (or aluminum, if you prefer), then it would be a bad idea to leave it in anything acidic, as it could contaminate the food with aluminium salts, which may (it's controversial) be implicated in Alzheimer's.


0

While I agree with john2103 I would also add that if the soup is thickened with tapioca starch, the soup could un-thicken due to the possible moving ladle.


3

Maybe because the ladle gets hot and could burn someone?


0

I have just come up with something to enhance the flavour of a vegetable soup that I've made, as it came out a little bland: spicy tomato ketchup (specifically Levi Roots Reggae Reggae Tomato Ketchup). The soup was made with a broth mix ( yellow & green split peas, marrow fat peas, split lentils, pearl barley) it also had sautéed onions, carrots, ...


0

I would say NEVER cook noodles at the same time for all the reasons the smart friends above suggested but my adamant reason is that it makes the soup look and taste like dishwater!


4

A few ways exist to keep your spoon from falling into your soup. The first of which is to not keep your spoon in your soup. How to do that however, is quite varied: Purchase a spoon rest. Use a clean and empty plate to rest your spoon on by laying the spoon head on the plate. I, being a bit of a frugal cook, don't own a spoon rest. I use a plate - ...


6

The obvious solution is to not let the spoon in the pot. While you may just let it rest on the pot, you can also use a spoon rest, as I do. Spoon rests I always let one of those on the oven so that I can avoid making a mess of my kitchen when I am finished using my ustensils.


6

Use a longer spoon? Stir, then set on spoon rack next to pan?


2

There's no reason why you couldn't boil vegetables as you make the stock and then puree them in as a base. It's really about taste and the result you want. Making the stock without vegetables in it will give you a clear broth with a simple pork flavor and the vegetables will be distinct in it. If you add vegetables while cooking the stock and then puree ...


3

If you are going to cook a stock for 4 hours, the flavor of the vegetable will contribute to the overall flavor of the stock...but not be so great in vegetables themselves...and their texture will be very soft. I would strain and de-fat the stock... then use the stock you created to build your soup. Add vegetables at this point and cook just until the ...


2

Don't underestimate the value of V-8 juice to add flavor. My last batch i used the spicy V8, with a touch of red pepper...it really added a welcome bite to the soup.


3

In addition to the 3 methods which MoscafJ points out, there is another one which is a particular favourite of Heston. I've used it a couple of times, and whilst its quite time consuming, it is very effective. Make your broth in the usual way - I would include the cheese as there's no opportunity really to add it later. Once its cooled freeze it in a ...


2

I'm going to step out on a limb here and declare that you'll need to add more of the other ingredients. Even then, you're likely to throw off the overall balance of flavors because they have not all cooked together. Here's a study abstract that suggests there are about 6 compounds that primarily contribute to the flavor and aroma of celery. However, as a ...



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