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1

In tribute to French origins, can I suggest that chowders are soups that begin with a roux. Rhode Island chowder is thick but clear - it contains butter, but no cream or tomato. It does start with a butter/flour base.


0

I've always been taught that the differences between soups and stews is the size of chunks of food that you cook in the broth or whatever liquid you want to use as a base. Sure anyone can call a soup a stew, or call a stew a soup, and it wouldn't make much of a difference. But typically in my experience Stews are chunkier and heartier than soups.


2

In case you find yourself without a blender, but DO find yourself with a pressure cooker, follow the recipe sauteeing the ingredients, then just add maybe 1/2 cup of water or stock, and pressure cook for 5 mins under full pressure (if you have the timing kind) or 1-2 whistles (if you have the whistling kind). Once this cools and you can open it, you will see ...


1

Oil is the optimal medium to bloom the taste of a pepper. For that reason I would go with the chili oil or paste. It will be easier to control the amount of heat in the soup because it will disperse more quickly and you can taste test more easily. If you choose to use paprika, I suggest getting one that is labeled "hot", but not one that is labeled "smoked" ...


3

Of the recipes you link to only one contains paprika, another one lists "Chinese chili paste, chili oil, hot sauce or dried red chili flakes to taste". The one that specifies paprika doesn't mention a specific type of paprika. Without further distinction, that generally means the sweet, non-smoked variety. Sweet paprika is just dried, powdered pimento, the ...


2

It's definitely just a matter of preference. I'd expect the vegetables from the stock to be overcooked for my tastes, I like a little texture in my soup.


1

Yeah you can reuse the vegetables just fine. I mean why waste food. Reusing the vegetables shouldn't alter the taste of the soup in an adverse way.


3

Elendil has addressed most of your specific questions, but overlooked one: why did the herbs sink to the bottom? The simple answer is density: as a general rule, things will float in water if they're less dense than water, and sink if they're more dense. Typically fresh herbs will float, and dried herbs will sink. To get around this you could try changing ...


4

To address your points in order: If you only cooked your soup for ten minutes, you didn't give it enough time for the flavours to 'marry'. A gentle simmer for half an hour would give you better results. A night in the fridge to really let everything blend would be even better. You will not get crispy potatoes in a soup - the liquid will see to that. The ...


2

If your recipe and objective is dairy tolerant, then dairy will be the best way. If it's not, and dilution is not an option, I recommend adding a sweet or acidic (or both) component to the vegetable soup. examples to keep it all veggies and no dairy: Sweet - pre-roasted carrots or butternut squash (I find roasting enhances the sweetness) Acidic - pan ...


3

According to this rather informative post (http://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/1126), the remedy to your problem seems to be using fats, especially oils. These two sites http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/01/what-to-do-when-you-add-too-much-spice-make-less-spicy.html http://rosie2010.hubpages.com/hub/How-to-make-spicy-sauce-less-spicyhot both seem to ...


4

Usually, cream will help cut the heat from peppers, including crushed red peppers. Not sure if your soup would work with dairy. Yogurt or milk would work, sour cream too. Cheese does not seem to help.



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