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2

Very simply, all of them work. The major driver of what tastes good to you is expectations. If you are accustomed to eating soup with a certain taste, and expect it to taste that way, then any time you prepare the soup with something different, it won't taste good to you. But there is no rule to define that some liquids taste good as a soup base and ...


3

Just to provide an official source, the USDA's National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF) says this: Question 4: What minimum time/temperature parameters for hot holding would ensure food safety? . . . For non-continuous temperature and time monitoring, a minimum hot holding temperature of 130 degrees Fahrenheit ...


2

Becky Epstein, author of Substituting Ingredients, The A to Z Kitchen Reference, 4th Edition, suggests farro, spelt, or wheat berries.


5

Barley's there to bulk out the soup, and add a bit of flavor and texture. It doesn't thicken or have any other special function, so you don't need to add anything to replace it. If you want to add something with a roughly similar size with some texture then short grain rice like risotto or paella rice will do, however I prefer Orzo, which is a type of very ...


2

If by leave lid ajar you are talking about after cooking and into the 'cooling stage' I pretty certain the advice to leave the lid ajar is to help with the cooling process. The longer food is kept between 5 and 63 degrees bacteria is growing. With the lid on heat struggles to escape as easily meaning it will stage in that 'danger' zone for longer. You ...


7

This is a myth. Soup will NOT spoil faster if the lid is left on normally after cooking. In fact, leaving the lid ajar may make it easier for contamination to enter the pot and lead to faster spoilage. I assume there may be two reasons behind this myth: (1) Before the days of modern refrigerators, many people would leave food to cool on the counter or ...


0

Lid open, lid closed, lid ajar...this all controls heat and evaporation. Evaporation = concentration of flavors. So it depends on what you are trying to accomplish. One caution, if you season your soup (with salt for example), then cook with the lid off, you will lose water to evaporation and concentrate the seasoning (or saltiness, if salted to taste ...


1

Don't BOIL, only ever a slow gentle simmer - Not just Chicken all Meat. If you insist on putting your Chicken in there at the start of cooking you make be better off with boneless thighs as they contain slightly more fat and sinew (good for keeping meat moist). Personally though I'd recommend buying a whole chicken. Shop's around me charge around the same ...


2

MgGee in his Keys To Good Cooking, recommends a couple of things that go straight to the problem you describe. First, he recommends working with lower temperatures (his bolds, his italics). Searing meat does not seal in its juices, and moist cooking methods do not make meats moist. Juiciness depends almost entirely on how hot you cook the center of ...


3

Don't cook the chicken pieces for so long. Add them ten or twenty minutes before serving. For that matter, I wouldn't simmer the aromatics for that long either. Do the long simmer and cooking to make the chicken stock, then strain the now-tasteless and mushy expended bits from the flavorful stock. Heat the stock and add the sweated veggies, diced chicken, ...


0

There are a few of us that taste that moldy taste when a certain brand of commercial thyme seasoning is used. It's a tastebud thing, like those of us who taste soap instead of yummy when eating cilantro. That might be it - if you used a seasoning you normally don't use.


9

Attention - possible gross information to follow. Queasy fellows stop reading here, please! Long simmering aside: If some saliva has gotten into your soup (e.g. someone tasting and double-dipping), corn and potatoe starch might break down, too. This is caused by an enzyme (Amylase), that breaks the loger starch down into smaller particles. (see ...


15

Unfortunately, cornstarch does that. It does not reheat well. Potato starch is even worse, and that's the thickener in Knorr's Leek Soup. If you want to reheat something thickened, your best bet is to thicken it with a roux. There are other more modern thickeners (think molecular gastronomy), but I don't know much about those.


2

I made some vegetable beef soup that was bland, bland, bland. When I refrigerated it, I had to use 2 bowls as I didn't have one big enough, so I am reheating them in 2 pots right now. I added some fresh basil and rosemary to one of the pots and some beef stock to the other pot. I then added some parmesan, about 1/2 - 2/3 cup to each pot and they both ...


1

To my bitter lettuce soup I added lots of carrots, some sugar, some honey, extra peas, instant mashed potatoes, cannolini beans, some mini pastas and some apples. After all of that the soup is now tasty.


3

I am trying to think of anything that would refute this notion, but I cannot -- there is no reason you should not be able to hold a liquid at those temperatures for an indefinite period of time. So long as you are reconstituting the mixture with water that is not contaminated, and doing so slowly enough to drop the temperature of the system below 130F, you ...


2

A healthy and flavoursome choice. Very sensible given your parameters -- no experience and low budget. My experience of student needs pointed to chicken and game rather than lamb, beef, pork, etc. The modus operandi is to cover a chicken with water in a large pan and bring to the boil with a bay leaf, a carrot, an onion, a stick of celery and some ...



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