New answers tagged

3

Since a starter is actually a symbiotic mixture of microorganisms, factors like hydration level can change the balance of bacteria and yeasts. Depending on which organisms are favored, it can change the flavor, gas production, etc. They're not necessarily "benefits", but different consistencies can definitely produce different starters. The biggest and most ...


1

Wide mouth glass jar with a piece of wax paper loosely rubber banded over the top. Keeps it from drying out, but if the starter goes nuts, it just pushes the wax paper up and out of the rubber band--no worry of exploding glass.


0

I reviewed and did the conversions of your measurements. It would seem that your liquid is too high. This would account for the lack of spring in the bread and the "pancaking". I wish I could see a picture of the end result. Large holes and blistering crusty surface would indicate too much water. Reduce your water to 720g for the whole wheat and 770g for the ...


3

Tangzhong (water roux) and levain are two fundamentally different things. The roux does not contain any leavening element, it is simply a method to bind water, effectively increasing the amount of water that can be used in a dough and therefore making a light, soft, moist bread. A levain (sourdough) is the part that is responsible to create the "lift" due ...


2

Years ago when I worked with sourdough a lot I used a stoneware crock that was just the right size for the amount of starter and it had a lid that was not air tight, so it worked perfect for the job. Over the years of not having a starter (I stopped doing it when I had to go back to work) and moving a couple of times, I misplaced that "perfect" crock and ...


1

...as long as it needs to, depending on a wide variety of factors. You can shape it for baking, put it in the fridge, let it rise, pull it out of the fridge and put it in the oven - no warming up time at all. If you are going to punch down/knead/form after it comes out of the fridge, you can do all that cold, and let it rise as long as it needs to before ...


1

I have been baking with honey and molasses for some time now and I see no much differences except that dough and bread gets much dark brown colour.



Top 50 recent answers are included