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1

Unfortunately, your link does not seem to be working for me right now, but assuming you are making a leavened bread dough, here's some tips. Let me know if you've tried all these before. Wet your hands before handling the dough. This will temporarily keep the dough from sticking to your hands but be warned: this effect will not last forever. Make sure to ...


2

In my experience, the two things you can do to most improve the crumb of your bread are: Autolyse - Basically this means that once you combine your flour and water, let the dough sit for awhile (I usually autolyse for 20-30 minutes). This allows the flour to more completely absorb the water, and results in a more extensible dough. Some say that ...


40

This is not true anymore, and modern recipes omit that part. Back then, when silverware was made either from silver or pre-stainless-steel-alloys the acid in sourdough (and other foods*) would interact with the metal and corrode/color the metal and/or spoil the food. So put your sourdough in your (stainless steel) mixing bowl and knead it in your kitchen ...


1

For the first bake, that didn't form a bottom crust - it sounds like the bread stone might not have been heated enough. An oven with a baking stone needs a lot more preheating, since the reason the stone is useful is that retains heat; it's as slow to cool down as it is to heat up. If the stone was still absorbing heat when you put the dough on, it would ...


1

I am still very much an amateur in this area, however my current mental model is that the way to develop more flavor is by slowly cultivating many generations of yeast. So, the potential problem with letting your young yeast get all the sugar all at once, is that you greatly reduce both the time and the number of generations. One option is let your yeast ...


0

You should try the same recipe again, but use a cloth instead of plastic wrap to cover your dough for the fermentation period. The alcohol smell is the ethanol the yeast is producing, and in my own experience the more anaerobic the greater the level of ethanol produced.


1

Completely agree with derobert's answer, though the way to do all of this efficiently is through simple calculation. You just need to calculate how many feedings between batches of bread and then tailor the amount you save from your previous batch based on that. For example, the regimen you describe would be appropriate if your bakery requires 26 lbs. of ...


5

I've only baked at home, not commercially, but something sounds amiss if you're throwing away a ton of starter. [And wow, having a multi-lb starter!] You throw away starter to keep your starter from getting too big, when you're not baking with it. And I'd hope a commercial bakery is always baking with it. Example: if your starter is 4lbs and you're keeping ...



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