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(1) Feeding your starter more often than once a day is usually counterproductive. If you do not give the microorganisms plenty of time between feedings to grow and reproduce you will just end up wasting a lot of time and flour. One of the crucial steps for sourdough yeasts to be happy and reproduce with limited competition is the acidification of the ...


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~~ The molecules (arrangement of atoms) which comprise pizza dough are polymeric in affinity. You've probably heard of polymer chains, usually in association with petrochemicals. But foods too can possess this property. Polymers invariably are long structures because their individual molecules like to come together in relatively straight lines, sort of ...


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I think there's lots of things at play in your situation. Bread has many variables ("degrees of freedom"), and this is part of the reason that bread is so fun and so diverse (and so fun)! Experimentation is warranted here, I think. There's many sourdough enthusiasts around here, so you'll probably get many different opinions. Take the suggestions you like ...


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Yeast action is only one factor in getting a rise when baking. Yeast metabolizes sugars and produces CO2 bubbles which puff up your dough, and also help with gluten development to make your dough stretchy. However, when you bake your dough much of the lift you get is from the expansion of water turning into steam - this is what makes pizza dough puff up a ...


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The alcohol was not a problem in my case. I want to clarify that my sourdough was not producing any liquid in any visible quantity, the alcoholic smell started to fade as soon as I leaved the container opened for a about a day . I have also used the very same sourdough, without refreshing it in the meantime, for my latest baked goods and it's active and ...


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Most likely, the yeast in your starter are getting tired and/or hungry. A starter will start developing a strong alcohol smell and start "leaking" a dark fluid once the yeast start running out of food. This happens to me if I neglect my starter for over 2 weeks or so. I would recommend keeping your starter in the refrigerator, not at room temperature. You ...


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If you've truly gone anaerobic and the smell is off, you are growing things other than the intended cultures... As a rule, I simply feed mine flour and water. No sugar. The cultures can get along fine with the flour. (I did read in a reputable baking book about adding leftover water from boiling potatoes, for the starches, but I haven't had a chance to ...


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Im a little late on this debate. However, my husband tells me that his grandmother used to make her bread starter with potato peel and lemon juice. Once started, this culture used to sit in a warm place and be fed sugar and probably flour regularly. Bread was made each day for the family. How are you going 3 years on with your experiment. I'm interested ...


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Cast iron is ideal, but any pot that can take the heat and has a tight lid will work. Like @talon8 said in his comment, it doesn't even have to be metal. This article from Around the World in 80 Bakes specifically uses terracotta for sourdough, not cast iron. Just as an FYI, this related question deals with preheating (for no-knead bread, not sourdough), ...



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