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100

Surely the authors of the previous (sublime!) answers will throw the "Sure it works in practice, but does it work in theory!?" at me, but this great SE question and its answers still lured me into creating an answer backed up by empirical evidence. The Answer YES! It's certainly possible. At least one successful attempt has been logged (see below). The ...


98

Cooking in a dishwasher is related to some other non-orthodox places to cook, like on the manifold of a car on a road trip. Basically, you're aiming to put food in an environment that's somewhere between 160F (71C) and 300F (150C) already, for non-cooking reasons. That's strange, but not entirely nuts. The dishwasher is going to stay south of 212F (100C), ...


27

I would wrap it up in tinfoil with some herbs and spices and maybe some lemon and set it to the pots and pan setting and let it run. I would make sure to temp it before you eat it and make sure that it is fully cooked. Also, you might want to lay it on the top so the steam and water cook it rather than the heating element at the bottom. I would also ...


26

Here is why it's stupid: Sous-vide doesn't get hot enough to kill botulism spores. Low acid foods will be very dangerous. Boiling is required for a strong seal on canning jars. All pectin jellies I have seen require boiling to set. High acid recipes often call for processing in a water bath for a mere 10 minutes to seal the lids. Recipes that don't call ...


22

This is essentially a Sous Vide hack (like the beer cooler, which is only slightly less weird). This would probably work best with a newer dish washer that can use cooler wash cycles. A quick google shows some wash cycles down in the 125F to 135F range, which is a common temperature to sous vide salmon. I personally don't like salmon at this temperature and ...


18

It is to lower the water evaporation from the bath, and keep the temperature of the bath even. The concept has been used in chemistry labs for years! But normally, the balls are smaller and made of polythene - those are a bit big.


15

I use Propane all the time. There are several factors as to why: It is cheap, about 1/4 the price of butane. It’s more readily available. You can buy a propane torch at many different stores for very cheap. The torches typically put out a lot more heat. I’ve used both propane and butane, mostly for crème brulee, but other food as well. The butane ...


15

First of all, I agree with the others that there is no harm done by plastic bags for sous vide. I have read a statement by the manufacturer that brand-name Ziploc bags don't release anything below 76°C. If you think how much a lawsuit could cost them if the information turned out to be wrong, I trust that they are telling the truth. For other brands, you may ...


13

The definitive source for Sous Vide information on the web at the moment is Douglas Baldwin's wonderful A Practical Guide to Sous Vide. It has wonderful safety information and goes well beyond the 'recipe' side of Sous Vide. It's pretty much the bible (since Modernist Cuisine is too expensive). Based on the information he has on pasteurizing eggs, I would ...


12

I have succeeded using this beer cooler method described by Serious Eats.


11

After a bit of googling, I found this which suggests that searing twice (both before and after) might be preferable.


8

In Heston Blumenthal's "Family Food" he says that they cook fish in a 45C stirred water bath at his restaurant. There is another recipe of his where he poaches pears in a dishwasher using sealed and vacuumed "Food Saver" bags. If you have a dishwasher with a 45C setting you could combine the two ideas. He says that the cooking time for a 250g skinless ...


8

You could use oil, but I don't think it's worth it; realize that you're going to be using additional energy for obtaining, cleaning, and disposal of it. Regarding using a broth with a porous bag, well, that isn't sous vide. That's more akin to a slow-cooker. The whole point of sous vide is the airtight barrier between food and heat. Update Oil does not ...


8

Buy a slow cooker. They're cheap, and it will cook your food slowly in around 6 hours. Don't overcomplicate things: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow_cooker


8

If you do it properly, no there are no health issues. A combination of two things are required to kill beasties: heat and time. The higher the heat you expose them to, the faster they die. Generally any temperature above 130 F is enough to kill most beasties, it just requires a significantly larger amount of time compared to a higher temperature. I go into ...


8

The only way to be completely sure is to contact Foster Farms and ask them what their packaging is made of and whether or not it is a totally airtight seal. Everything else is speculation. There are, however, two data points on which to speculate, both from their preparation page, and this is more broadly applicable to any company that distributes food ...


8

Pretty much...yes, but you can fix it!. When you properly sous vide or very slow cook anything, you'll retain more of the myoglobin color because of the even cooking that often doesn't go above 140 at all. So a properly cooked steak like this will retain much more of its red colored myoglobin. Simply put, the meat will have more red juices to release! ...


8

You cooked it at too low a temperature. Sous vide is intended for meat where you want the protein to remain tender. It shouldn't have any sinews. Think chicken breasts, or the long filet along the spine of a pig. This meat gets nicely cooked at 60-65°C (depends on the animal), and tough and dry above that. Meat marbled with sinews has to be cooked at a ...


8

Yep, Ziploc bags are fine although make sure you have ones that are appropriately heat sensitive for whatever temperatures you'll be cooking at. There's a good guide on the Cooking Issues blog: http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-ii-low-temperature-cooking-without-a-vacuum/#sectionII3b1 Fill a container with water deep enough to ...


7

Fresh Meals Solutions makes a couple DIY sous-vide add-ons. The FreshMealsMagic submersion heater goes into a pot of water and creates air bubbles to circulate heat. The company's SousVideMagic temperature controller claims: It instantly turns rice cookers, slow cookers/crockpot, and many other cookers/heaters into a constant temperature bath for ...


7

You can always go with steel pie weights.


7

I would recommend using Whiskey Stones. They are used in whiskey instead of ice cubes. So they should be heavy, won't rust, and are supposed to be immersed in liquid that you'll consume. I think that probably meets all your criteria. Whiskey Stones Another alternative is to use a rack. This comes with the Sous Vide Supreme and I find it quite useful for ...


7

This completely depends on all of the other factors involved in botulinum growth, not to mention the particular strain you're concerned about (there are several). Salt, acidity (low pH), low moisture, and extreme temperature (low or high) will all slow botulinum growth significantly. There are proteolytic and non-proteolytic types of bacteria. The ...


7

Water has one of the highest heat capacities available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_capacity#Table_of_specific_heat_capacities Your ceramic is not going to hold nearly as much heat as the water bath itself. If you are finding that your bath is cooling too quickly then you are better off investigating your cooler.


7

What you need for the conversion of collagen is a certain amount of energy. It is a complicated process - the melting point is around 70°C for the type of collagen contained in beef, but the melting does not happen instantly once the meat reaches 70°C. In a pressure cooking, you can apply the same amount of energy in a shorter amount of time. This is not ...


7

I'm sorry that you're having problems with my book. I think the problem is that you're adding water to the pouch. In the recipe, step 4 asks you to: Vacuum-seal the broccoli, butter, and a pinch of salt and pepper in a large pouch so that the florets are in a single layer. This will crush the tops a bit, but it will be much easier to seal. Sorry ...


7

Accuracy of the temperature is going to vary by oven, so there's no definitive answer there. As GdD said, you'll just have to get a thermometer and try it. However, I think this will probably work fine for most sous vide applications. While sous vide is all about precision, a couple of degrees fluctuation isn't going to make a huge difference for most ...


7

Yes, fast chilling is critical because it minimizes the production of new bacteria and potentially deadly toxins from the spores of anaerobic pathogens such as C. botulinum and C. perfringens. The spores are not killed by the low temperatures usual in sous vide, and the oxygen-free environment of the bag brings them back to activity. But they require time ...


7

You certainly could. I read the PDF manual online at the manufacturer's website, and it appears that this particular machine has no internal circulation device like a water jet or impeller (somehow, fan doesn't seem like the right word under water). It relies entirely on thermal convection to circulate the water bath. In fact, it seems to have no moving ...


7

Assuming it says 100% for the potatoes, I don't think you've got the scaling right. The recipe format picks a baseline ingredient, then gives the quantities for other ingredients as percentages of that ingredient. So if it says potatoes 100%, water 200%, then for 1kg of potatoes you need 2kg (2L) of water. See the detailed explanation from the source. The ...



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