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Flank steak consists of the abdominal muscles, primarily the rectus abdominis muscle. The superior epigastric artery and vein* pass through the muscle. Sometimes, during processing, small clots will form inside the blood vessels which will manifest as blood spots when the muscle is cut perpendicular to grain. *The drawing linked is of a human, but in this ...


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I would think the red pockets are liquefied fat and/or water with red dye in them (and some myoglobin, which is what makes red meat red, but often dye is the bigger reason). If it's steak from a supermarket, it's probably thoroughly dyed, so maybe some of the dye (or a lot of it!) stuck with the fat. Blood wouldn't be bright red, it would be oxidized and a ...


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Many prefer a pre-sear, low temp cook, post sear...and some pre-sear from frozen. A few folks (Dave Arnold in particular) have done taste tests and prefer the flavor from the pre.. then post sear. I find that the pre-sear (or a dunk in boiling water) is necessary with something like oxtail and short rib for the purpose of disposing of surface bacteria that ...


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Nope. Haha :) Brining will give you a softer texture. I have brined duck for varying times (depending on how much of a rush I was in) and brining really does help with the texture. You can sear it beforehand, some Maillard reaction will help in flavour development, but when I cook sous vide for more than 8 hours, I don't bother: the meat will go ...


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My easiest and most precise method isn't to roast the flour, but to "fry the flour" instead. This method provides much better control and ensures the roux is precisely as dark as you like. --- Put one cup of flour in a non-stick pan. --- Turn the heat high as if you were using the conventional method. --- Using a non-stick spatula, continue to keep turning ...


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Cook the medium steak at the temperature you desire until its done. The add ice or cold water to lower the temp for the rare steak. The first steak will only stay warm, but not cook past medium since you have lowered the temp. When the second steak is fully cooked then remove and char both.


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Sous vide cooking is a function of temperature and the surface area to volume ratio of the food in question. If you have a high surface area to volume the cooking time will be shorter. Steaks would have a higher ratio than the roast so they would take less time than the roast. The amount of the time difference is difficult to predict exactly over such a ...


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That's the first thing I did with my Anova circulator. It turns chuck into ribeye! (so to speak) Notice no grey border? And the perfect medium rare?! I don't know about sous-vide cooking chuck as a roast (although I do have a recipe), because I haven't done it (yet). It turned out so great as a steak that I'll probably do at least one more as steaks ...


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You can cook chicken at 135F, or indeed any temperature 131F or up. It will take a while; several hours, as noted in the Baldwin Sous Vide Guide you posted. If you pasteurize it at 135F, you can then later cook it, ignoring the temperature (and only worrying about the texture, etc.), as its already cooked to safety. If you want to hold it, chill it down ...


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I would not do this. While you don't mention an amount of time, the temperature is much lower than what you would need to cook chicken safely. You could easily incubate and multiply harmful bacteria, and while you might kill them off later in the oven...is it worth the risk? Just cook the chicken the traditional way. Here is a good resource for sous vide ...


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Since you're cooking by sous-vide anyway, why don't you put the vacuum sealed, seasoned chicken breasts in the freezer? You just put the still frozen packs into the circulator a half-hour or 45 minutes sooner. Then you will always have a no-muss no-fuss dinner at the ready. Here's a YouTube video of exactly that. Season differently and vacuum seal a whole ...


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The general consensus is that about a week should be safe for vacuum sealed chicken. I would say though, that the sealing and preservation method is not the bottleneck here. Should the chicken be totally free of contaminants and packaged in a sterile environment you should be able to store the meat until it naturally decomposes. On the other hand, if you ...


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for SV-to-table, I use ziploc bags that are marked "microwave safe"


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I cooked one salmon and one halibut filet (1/2 - 3/4" thick, 8 oz each) in this exact same setup -- Anova + stockpot -- last week, at 130 degrees and 30 minutes. It was perfectly cooked.


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Your set-up is fine. You'll probably eventually want to trade in the stock-pot for something like this: But there is no reason that the set-up you have shouldn't make great salmon. I have exactly that set-up (including the stock-pot for now, but the square polypolycarbonate container is on order). 125F for one hour is pretty close to bare minimum time ...


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Pretty sure you didn't cook it long enough. The thickness of a salmon fillet, at a guess (I don't have one on me to measure) is about 40mm. Going by http://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html#Fish_and_Shellfish to reduce Listeria down to safe levels alone, I think you should have cooked it for much longer ...


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Sheep stomach would likely work, as for Haggis as might intestine from a large enough animal. Barring anything quite that 'organic', Cellulose or Collagen based sausage casings should work. You can buy them in a variety of sizes; 3.675" (93 mm) is easy to find.


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Just saw these reusable silibagz on indiegogo, they claim to seal airtight and the cylindrical design makes it easy to stand on its own for mixing ingredients. But they're $30 plus $7 shipping to the U.S. https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/sawatdee-silibagz



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