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22

Chick peas/Garbanzo beans, lentils, and other legumes (black beans, Great Northern beans), and nuts (nuts are a bit pricier). Cheap and vegan/vegetarian friendly!


12

If you use every bit of a whole chicken it becomes a significant value. The meat can be eaten as a main, but stretched even more by being shredded and used in dishes such as chicken pot pie, enchiladas, quesadillas, and so many other dishes that use some chicken mixed in with vegetables. Once the meat is off the bone the bones should be used to make stock. ...


10

This is a complex question, because there are several different ways to categorize soy sauces: COUNTRY OF ORIGIN (Chinese and Japanese are the ones most commonly contrasted --but as you saw in Wikipedia, there are many more), COLOR (light, dark, white), VISCOSITY (thin, thick, jam), and MANUFACTURING PROCESS (This has the most name variation, but there ...


10

Soy sauce, sake or mirin and sugar are the usual ingredients in a teriyaki sauce. The rice wines in particular are vital for an authentic teriyaki flavour. So the question is somewhat moot: onions aren't usually found in teriyaki sauce anyway. The onions naturally add flavour to your marinade: if you like it, leave them in, if you don't, take them out. The ...


9

Egg whites are a pretty good one. Our local grocery store even sells them in milk carton containers.


9

I have a bottle of San-J Tamari (black label) in my fridge and the back reads: Tamari is a premium soy sauce made with more soybeans than ordinary soy sauce giving it a richer, smoother, more complex taste. Tamari has more flavor enhancing properties than salt. Add 1 tsp. (320 mg sodium) instead of tsp. salt (590 mg sodium) to reduce sodium intake. ...


7

I may be jumping the gun here and making unwarranted assumptions about what this sauce is being used for, but assuming it's something like a marinade, rice, stir-fry, etc... I usually use some combination of the following: Soy or teriyaki sauce (or both) Toasted sesame oil Honey or brown sugar Chili oil (small amount, obviously) Grated ginger Grated garlic ...


7

Soy sauce is pretty salty. It sounds like a great deal of water diffused out of your chicken and into the marinade, which significantly changed the texture of the meat. It's not uncommon to do something like this on purpose. When you make gravlax, for example, you cover a piece of salmon with quite a bit of salt and refrigerate it for a day or two. The salt ...


7

Yes, salt is one of the primary ingredients of soy sauce, along with soybeans, wheat, and water. It's used as an ingredient or condiment to add saltiness, just like plain salt generally is in Western cuisines. (Soy sauce additionally adds umami flavor.)


7

No, you can not. Milk is used as a liquid in cakes. Eggs add a little bit of liquid, but also have lots of other effects on your batter. You don't want these effects, or rather, you want them to happen in a certain degree, and the ratio of eggs to milk in existing recipes is calculated to give you the optimal degree. The effects are too many to explain in ...


6

Turkey is one of the cheaper meats - here in the UK anyway. I'm not talking about whole turkeys around Christmas or Thanksgiving time but I know that in my local supermarket turkey mince is significantly better value for money than say beef or chicken.


6

Eggs are cheap. But they do have a lot of cholesterol in them.


6

Let me share what I know about Japanese shoyu, from the viewpoint of someone who grew up in Hawaii (where we put it on everything) and is now living in Japan (where shoyu is on the same level as wines and whiskey)... Koi-kuchi Shoyu (Rich-flavor): This is the most commonly used shoyu in Japan, accounting for about 82% of all shoyu consumed. It imparts a ...


6

You need to consider the role of the oils in the dish. The soy oil is almost certainly used for its frying properties (to help prevent sticking, and more efficiently transmit heat from the pan to the food). For this function, you can use any vegetable oil or shortening for frying, based on your dietary preferences and your relative's sensitivities. ...


6

If you hate the soy burgers, you will probably hate meatloaf made from them. Your best bet might be to defrost 1 or 2 burgers and mix them with ground beef (or whatever meat you use for meatloaf) with no more than 25% of the mix being the soy burgers. If you like your first meatloaf, you can always try a little bit higher percentage of the soy burgers next ...


5

You can caramelise onions for making the rich sweet-savoury flavour, but you have to caramelise it slowly, and be very patient...it doesn't get made in 5 minutes. Also, for something ready-made, Coconut Secret makes a coconut-based liquid aminos that contain no soy, and we got it at Whole Foods.


5

I'd do a reduction of PX dessert sherry, seasoned with salt and a mix of peppers (add more spices to taste). It's not exactly a replacement of soy sauce, but it has a dark, rich flavor as well.


5

Assuming TVP is what you used... it is essentially a byproduct of the production of tofu, and as such is largely tasteless on its own. Generally, to use it you first rehydrate it with a 1:1-1.5 ratio of TVP to liquid. The liquid can be pretty much anything, from water, to broth, mustard, ketchup, liquid smoke, etc. Very similar to tofu, it will absorb the ...


5

I can get soy beans in two varieties here: As dried beans and as edamame. Edamame is a particular type of soybean that is harvested when it is still young. The pods are cooked (usually boiled or steamed) and then served with salt. The beans are popped from the pod and eaten. The pod is discarded. Edamame is sweet and a little grassy because it is young. ...


4

It doesn't answer the follow-up question, but one subtle difference is that tamari doesn't always have wheat in it, while soy always does. This means, if you're cooking for people with gluten intollerance, some types of tamari is safe, while soy sauce never is. (I've made the mistake of using soy when cooking for someone ... I now have a bottle of wheat ...


4

This sounds like seitan to me, or mock duck, mock chicken, braised gluten, or one of the various other names for it. It is made from wheat gluten and has a texture, as you state, between tofu and a kind of rubbery steak. For vegetarians, it is my opinion that it is the closest of the simple meat substitutes to a sensible "meat" texture. I find it easiest ...


4

I think the wikipedia is pretty clear on the difference of the soy sauce, but I will give you little hints about Chinese and Japanese soy sauce. I am a Chinese. I think you can categorize the soy sauce from the 2 countries by their eating habits. Usually Chinese eats saltier cuisine, so their soy sauce is usually saltier, for example: frying, deep-frying, ...


4

I have never heard of Tofu being called "vegetable meat". There are some fake meat types based on different types of soya products (or also other plant proteins), like "fake duck". But the only product I have seen bearing the generic label "vegetable meat" is textured vegetable protein. It is made from soya beans whose fat has been extracted to be used for ...


4

It is basically as simple as you say (soak, blend, strain) ... just that you should also boil it (for long enough - cca. 10 minutes) to get rid of the fresh bean (grassy) flavor (mainly caused by oxidation of polyunsaturated oils in the beans), together with some other unpleasant side effects of eating uncooked beans (like the infamous gas-producing effect ...


4

They were literally thrown away, physically removed from the whole. The basic steps of making tofu are: Make soy milk out of the soy beans. The residue after straining the milk, called okara, is not used in the tofu. It contains lots of carbohydrates, especially insoluble fibre. Curdle the soy milk with epsom salt. Separate the curds from the whey and ...


4

Soy milk can spoil, just like ordinary cow's milk. That seems to be what happened. While spoilage in cow's milk is usually souring, and the smell is unmistakable at fifty paces, soy milk spoils by turning gooey. I'm not sure about the details, but it's something in how the proteins react to oxygen. In soy milk, if I'm not mistaken, they turn into longer, ...


3

I have done this in a few different ways and Cheesecloth works the best for me. The only difference between you and me is I separate the okara (fibrous material) when it's cold. I usually separate the okara as soon as I get the mixture out of blender. I then boil the liquid (soy milk) afterward, so it's pretty simple.


3

When straining things that clog up the screen, I tend to use a spoon or spatula to move the stuff around, so you can get expose un-obstructed parts of the screen. Of course, you might end up pushing some of the pulp through the process, but it's generally minimal. You can then either dump out the pulp as you go (possibly into muslin or cheese cloth, let it ...



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