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35

Yes, it is true that we don't add oil to the boiling water. I'm not aware of any good reason to waste extra-virgin olive oil that way! Some oil is always added at the end, over the sauce, when the pasta is already in the plate! It has to be raw, so that it retains its fruit nuances and texture. If you are doing cold pasta salad and want to avoid sticky ...


33

Ok, here is the straight dope, directly from De Cecco customer service: With reference to your question we would like to inform you that the numbers you mention do not have a logical criteria but are just code numbers which we give our products each time we make a new shape.


29

The common method would be to cook the pasta in advance, then shock it in cold water to stop the cooking before draining and refrigerating it. You would then heat it up in boiling water for about 20 seconds just to heat it through. You would just need a portable burner to keep a pot of water boiling for service. On the other hand, 20 pounds of pasta for ...


23

A tall thin pot is a hazard as it can be tipped over all too easily The book says use lots of water to ensure even cooking and to stop the pasta sticking. But regular stirring will solve this problem too Just use less water in a regular pot and feed the pasta into the boiling water. It takes about 30 seconds for long spaghetti to soften enough for it to ...


19

Red pizza sauce is often (but not always) two things: Thicker. Thinner sauce will tend to run in the oven and also steam the pizza crust as it cooks - if loaded with toppings, otherwise thin is fine. Depending on the crust, the heat of the oven, the toppings above sauce, and how watery it is, this may not be needed. If you've just got some crushed ...


18

Alton Brown covered this on an episode of Good Eats. There is a legitimate reason, and it has nothing to do with sticking; it's an anti-foaming agent, so you don't have to stir as much to keep down the foam you'll sometimes get. Any oil will work, it doesn't have to be the good stuff.


15

As a variation to SAJ14SAJ's suggestion: Cook and shock it as suggested, but instead of heating it back up in water, heat it back up in whatever sauce you're using. You'll want to pull the pasta early (a little before al dente), and should save some of the pasta water so that you can thin back out the sauce if the pasta starts absorbing too much. (the ...


12

No, it's not true. It will not change the way they cook. Noodle cooking times vary by what they're made out of and by thickness, not by the length of the noodles. The kids and I seem to prefer eating shorter noodles and dodging the hassle of spinning the noodles, but when there's company over we tend to do it the classic "right" way. No difference in taste. ...


11

The technique that many restaurants will use is to prepare the pasta ahead of time and store it in or on ice water. The chilled pasta may be then submerged briefly in boiling water and served.


10

Yes, cooking it more to evaporate off some of the liquid will definitely help. This is called reducing a sauce. A moderate simmer would be the appropriate temperature. You want to see occasional bubbles but definitely not a rolling boil. Stir it occasionally, making sure to get the bottom of the pot to avoid any scorching. It is possible to have it be quite ...


10

They are just a "product number", and it may vary for the same kind of pasta from a manufacturer to another.


10

As an Italian, I really don't know the logic behind the number. I also asked my mother, to no avail. We don't know, but as far as my feeling goes, it's just a numbering system for the product, e.g. there's no implicit meaning into it. As far as we worry about it or not, sure we do. Matching the wrong pasta with a given sauce is almost blasphemy and as a ...


9

Salt should be put before putting the spaghetti (or any other type of pasta for that matters) in the water. For 200g spaghetti (2 people) count ~2-3 liters of water and 20-30g rock salt. You can reduce the amount of salt if the sauce you are using is already quite salty. As a note to your point 2, the salt INCREASES the boiling point of water (a process ...


8

Split the squash in half lengthwise, drizzle with olive oil, and place face-down on a foil-covered baking sheet. I usually roast for 45 min to an hour, depending on the size of the squash. The inside 'noodles' can then be scooped out with a fork for an awesome pasta substitution. Enjoy!


7

Italians weigh it and it's really the only fail-safe way. Using a kitchen scale with a big bowl on top should work for just about any pasta shape. 40g for a small portion, 100g for a big plate full. Cooked volume will depend on the type of pasta, but with spaghetti for example about 55g of dry will produce about 1 cup of cooked spaghetti. This agrees ...


7

Well, one obvious answer is to look at the number of portions in the box. (This is found in the nutrition information.) Then divide the amount in the box by the number of portions. I just pulled down a box of linguine from my shelf. One pound yields eight 2 oz. portions. Which means all you have to do is divide in half three times. It won't be exact, but ...


7

You don't want to keep it warm -- that will lead to it steaming itself and overcooking. You need to get it cold and reasonably dry as quickly as possible so that it will stop absorbing water for the hour that it is sitting around, then reheat it quickly at the last minute. Undercook the pasta slightly -- by somewhere between two and one minutes -- so that ...


7

When you ask about "pizza sauce" I'll have to assume you mean the tomato based sauce that became the norm for just about all pizzas in North America since about 1955 when we crawled out of our meat & potato caves and started to try new things. (Thank you E.D. & J.C.) The reality is that there really isn't a "pizza" sauce. There is pizza and ...


7

Salt doesn't lower the boiling point of water, it elevates it. Even so, the amount of salt you add to pasta water (10g/litre is a good guide) will barely make a difference. You need to add nearly 6 times that amount of salt to a litre of water to raise its boiling point by 0.5°C. As throwing things into boiling water can result in splashing, I suggest ...


6

Your suggested design would topple over very easily, especially on a gas hob with a grate, risking serious injury. Aside from safety concerns, your design would also be inefficient as there is an extremely low surface area in contact with the hob. It would therefore take longer to heat up. Since the pasta is bunched together, there is a lower surface area ...


6

There is a legal difference: according to Italian law, pasta (which includes spaghetti) is made only with durum wheat. Other countries also accept soft wheat. The difference is in the amount of protein (mostly gluten): durum wheat has more, which in turn gives the pasta a somewhat snappier bite. Also, the cooked pasta stays eatable (as in, non-mushy) for a ...


5

The most common preparation is tomato sauce and parmesan cheese. Of course, some Americans will tell you that the only truly American way to eat spaghetti is to top it with chili, then shredded cheddar cheese, then chopped onions, then red kidney beans. It's hard to fully express the majesty of this dish, and should only be enjoyed on special occasions, ...


5

I might refer you to this video, where Malcolm Gladwell talks (a little bit) about spaghetti, and how Americans prefer to eat it. Apparently, companies doing market research found that Americans say they want "real Italian pasta sauce," which is somewhat thinner than "American style," but actually prefer eating the chunkier, heartier sauces now common on ...


5

It surely defines the tickness of the Pasta; tipically, more thicknesses corresponds to a greater number value. Example for Barilla: Capellini #1 Spaghettini #3 Spaghetti #5 Vermicellini #7 Vermicelli #8 Bucatini #9 Bavettine #12 Bavette #13


5

There are a few things you can do to thicken your sauce: Simmer - you can simmer the sauce at a low heat for quite a long time without affecting the flavour (generally improves it). Many Bolognese sauces are simmered for 30+ minutes. Thicken - add 1-2 tbsp of corn starch (or flour tempered). Many commercial sauces do this. Add paste - add a small tin of ...


5

Brewer here. Yes, that should work fine. Material-wise, you want stainless steel so there is no leaching of metal when you start to boil, and no break down if you use chemicals in it later for cleaning (don't ever leave any chemicals in the pot though, follow directions, many chemicals will even eat away stainless steel if left too long). Either stainless ...


5

The more stable sauces I've seen use the 3 whole eggs to 1 yolk ratio. However, the reason the recipes disagree might have to do with the following: Published March 1, 2013. Cook's Illustrated: The hardest part about making carbonara isn’t coming up with the right ratio of egg whites to yolks to make a creamy, rich sauce; it’s figuring out how to ...


5

I've asked this question to many friends of mine from Rome, and they all agree that only yolks should be used. Then I managed to find out the scientific reason behind this. The real challenge with this recipe, which makes the difference between a perfectly made creamy carbonara and just pasta with omelette, lies in temperature control. As a matter of fact, ...


4

You can also make it in the microwave. Either split first, remove the seeds and stringy goop, and place face-down on a microwave-safe plate or just prick it with a fork and cook it. Time will depend on size, but cook it until it's nice and soft. Then just use a fork to scrape out the flesh. The flesh will automatically come out in strings. You can also ...


4

You need a lot of water to dilute the starch in the pasta. Less water = more sticking.



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