Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

"Plastic chocolate" is a form of chocolate used for modeling and shaping decorative elements such as chocolate roses, ribbons and other elements for cakes and desserts. Take about 1 lb. of bittersweet chocolate and melt over a double boiler. When chocolate is melted, stir in 2/3 cup of light corn syrup. Mix until evenly blended and then set aside to cool. ...


19

What you are looking for is spherification. You need to use a different hydrocoloid than gelatin. There are a couple of techniques you can use. If you want solid spheres, you can mix your liquid with agar agar, which is readily available in the asain section of the grocery store, bring it to a simmer, and then use an eye dropper to drop the liquid in to a ...


5

I would try the cold oil spherefication method. Using agar agar as your gelling agent. The cold oil spherefication involves a solution which is in this case coffee that contains 1% to 2% agar (depending on desired consistency). The solution, which is warm is then inserted into a cold oil bath. Which will set the agar. Why agar? Because agar melt at 85C. ...


5

Basically anything that's liquid. Fruit is very common, but we've also done herbs (mint and sage specifically). I've also had vegetable spheres like pureed peas and beets as separate spheres. At restaurants, I've had beer sphere's served with pretzel (at Cyrus) and I've seen cointreau spheres used in a drink. They pop like caviar, and that's what releases ...


4

I don't have direct experience of this concept, but I do have a couple of comments that might help. A general comment about your choice of calcium salt: Gluconates have a side effect - they numb mouth tissue (like taste buds). It is not a drastic effect, but that is why gluconates are the salts of choice for that stuff you put on mouth ulcers ... I just ...


3

Plants are green due to the presence of chlorophyll. When chlorophyll is exposed to acids, alkalis, heat or enzymes, it first loses its long hydrocarbon tail, becoming water-soluble instead of fat-soluble. Then, hydrogen ions replace the magnesium atom in the center of the chlorophyll molecule, turning it to pheophythin, which has a dull green-yellow-grey ...


3

An issue here is that alginates (in the hydrocolloids) are not great at flavor release. The holes between the molecule structures are pretty small and aromatic and flavor molecules (being larger) get trapped. Ironically, Agar agar's network structure has large holes and does allow for good flavor release. As the alginate shell gets thicker (the gel you ...


3

Once the calcium and alginate react the process will continue regardless of whether you rinse them or not. The rinsing will slow the process down but won't inhibit the reaction altogether. In order to ensure liquid centers you will have to heat the spheres to 85°C for 10 minutes (from modernist cuisine). However, you have a ton of calcium going on in your ...


3

There certainly are solutions that will not work. The reaction will only occur within certain pH ranges. You will sometimes see the addition of sodium citrate in a recipe, this is to correct the pH in to acceptable ranges for the gel to form. For sodium alginate, the acceptable pH range is 2.8 - 10. However, if the pH is < 4, that can inhibit the process ...


2

I've tried making fake caviar with Jello and a syringe myself, but as far as I know, this is a fairly recent technique that became popular when molecular gastronomy piqued the interest of many, and no one has figured out how to do it with just Jello. You truly need to use a syringe to get the right shape and size, and special compounds and ...


2

in order to gel balsamic viniger into spheres the method is slightly differant to spherification in the way that you boil the vinegar up with agar agar and skim off any impurities. alowing to cool slighty before using a syringe to make drops into a tall glass of ice cold oil (put in freezer for 30mins prior to use.) the balsamic misture needs 2 be around ...


2

Reverse spherification You need to first make a sodium alginate bath, mix with one-third of the water to begin with using a hand blender and then add this to the final full proportions. You need to let this bath sit for a while to ensure there are no bubbles left. (Standard practice). Add your calcium lactate to the mixture you are trying to spherify. ...


1

This site say you can use it again, just make sure you strain it before you store it http://www.molecularmixology.co.uk/index.php?act=viewRecipe&recipeId=34 This site says you can store it for a couple of days in the fridge http://www.molecularrecipes.com/spherification/7-tips-making-spherification-caviar/ As for how many spheres can be produced - I'm ...


1

You can try this: Heat slightly quince jelly with some water, in order to make it melt. Use a pipette to let drops fall in a glass of cold oil. Use sunflower seed oil, which is not thickening when cold, put it in the fridge before you make your "eggs". That's more natural than other propositions I read here, and really delicious!


1

Alcohol :-) El Bulli (and The Aviary using El Bulli's recipes with permission) serve a cocktail called the "disappearing barbapapa". It's a modern take on a pina colada that starts with spherized rum in coconut milk with cotton candy at the top of the glass - then at the table, pineapple juice mixed with cider is poured through the cotton candy and the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible